BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 27, 2015

Cover ArtSamuel Wells, at The Christian Century, reviewed James K. A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Smith perceives the preponderance of American Christians as people bent on security, comfort, and autonomy….For such Christians, truth is equated with terms like absolute and objective, words that turn Christianity into a mechanism for achieving all-seeing impregnability. In order to preserve the power and privilege such a perspective is designed to secure, it’s necessary—at all costs—to hold on to representational notions of truth.

At Credo Magazine, Jeff Straub reviewed Why Study History? by John Fea (page 58).

Paul D. Adams, at In Christ, reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Always Have a Reason, J.W. Wartick shared a quote from Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, edited by Hans Madueme and Michael Reeves.

Keith Simon, at Every Square Inch, reflected on Bryan Litfin’s Early Christian Martyr Stories in light of the recent killing of 21 Coptic Christians.

The Gospel Coalition shared an excerpt from D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul, and released a video promo about the Praying with Paul study curriculum and discussion guide.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 6, 2014

Cover ArtBooks At a Glance interviewed Stanley Porter about his latest book, How we got the New Testament.

“I examine the textual basis of our Greek New Testament, reconstruct the history of its transmission from earliest times, and then trace the history of its translation. The overall result is an overwhelming affirmation of the reliability of the Greek New Testament….I hope that this has direct value for anyone interested in the New Testament, both pastors and lay people, and especially for those interested in some of the more technical aspects of its text.”

James Bradford Pate reviewed Union with Christ, by J. Todd Billings.

Lindsay Kennedy, at My Digital Seminary, reviewed Thomas Schreiner’s Romans BECNT volume.

Spoiledmilks reviewed the Mark BECNT volume, by Robert Stein.

At The Pneuma Review, Andrew K. Gabriel reviewed Mapping Modern Theology, edited by Kelly Kapic and Bruce McCormack.

David Barshinger, at Exploring Church History, reviewed John Fea’s Why Study History?

Thomas Booher, at The Tulip Driven Life, reflected on Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics.

The Courage to Die, a post from Rodney Decker, author of the forthcoming Reading Koine Greek, who passed away on Sunday, May 25, 2014.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 9, 2014

Cover ArtJoey Cochran reviewed Douglas Moo’s Galatians BECNT volume.

“Moo’s commentary on Galatians is a ballast for pastors wishing to faithfully exegete the message of this letter. You will not be disappointed in this commentary. You’ll find yourself consulting Moo’s commentary on Galatians endlessly as you preach through Paul’s earliest and seminal letter.”

At Zwinglius Redivivus, Jim West reviewed Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite.

Matthew Gilbert, at Theology Matters, reviwed Why Study History? by John Fea.

Why Study History? was also featured at Chris Gehrz’s blog, The Pietist Schoolman, in the posts Two (or Three) Why’s of History, and History as a “Ministry of Listening.”

Scot McKnight recommended J. Richard Middleton’s The Liberating Image.

Alex Farrell, at Transpositions, reflected on Creator Spirit by Steve Guthrie.

Scott Sunquist, author of Understanding Christian Mission, was interviewed on the Compassion Radio Podcast.

At The Southern Blog, Thomas Schreiner discussed his book The King in His Beauty.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 21, 2014

Cover ArtThe Good of Politics by James Skillen was extensively reviewed Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

“[I]t is with exceptional gladness that we can here announce the publication of the brand new book by James Skillen, The Good of Politics….In various ways in this important book, Skillen helps us ponder what we mean by ‘public justice’ and the ‘common good’ and ponders essential questions such as how the state – which is God’s good gift to us, not a bad thing — can use legitimate authority to help order our pluralistic political community.”

Billy Kangas at The Orant reviewed Jonathan Wilson’s God’s Good World.

At Everyday Theology, Marc Cortez reflected on discerning God’s work in historical events, and turned to John Fea’s Why Study History?

Also, the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association recently released its list of thirty-six finalists for the 2014 Christian Book Award. We are please to announce that the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi, and The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, have been selected as finalists in the Bible Reference category

BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 14, 2014

Cover ArtWhy Study History? by John Fea was reviewed by John G. Turner in The Christian Century.

“[Christians] should follow Fea’s advice to examine aspects of the past that initially repel them. Fea tells of a student with progressive views who chose to write a thesis about Jerry Falwell and the rise of the Christian right. He also recounts the reactions of students who read the diaries and sermons of slaveholding American Christians. It is easier to devote ourselves to historical subjects that we like or imagine to be more like us. Fea reports that his students have cultivated their capacities for empathy and compassion and became “better Christians.” Such encounters, Fea maintains, remind us that we are “imperfect creatures in need of improvement and redemption.”

At Euangelion, Michael Bird reviewed R. Michael Allen’s Justification and the Gospel.

David Gowler recommended the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi.

Richard Beck, at Experimental Theology, reflected on Christian formation in light of James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Tim Meadowcroft recommended John Goldingay’s three volumes on Psalms in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms, along with Richard Hess’s work on Song of Songs in the same series, in the Catalyst article “Building an Old Testament Library: Psalms — Daniel.”

James K. A. Smith recently spoke on Imagining the Kingdom at Spring Arbor University. You can watch his presentation here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 7, 2014

Cover ArtTony Campolo reflected on The Early Church on Killing, by Ron Sider.

“The book of Hebrews reminds us that we are ‘surrounded with a great crowd of witnesses’ to which we must be responsible in all that we do, but especially in our interpretations of the Holy Writ. As Ron Sider makes his case against Christians participating in war, supporting capital punishment, or justifying abortion, he supports his beliefs by resorting to the writings of some of the earliest Church leaders, and thus, takes Church tradition seriously.”

At Euangelion, Michael Bird reviewed Craig Keener’s Acts, Volume 2.

Joseph Sherrard, at Transpositions, reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Tim Challies recommended Grant Osborne’s Revelation volume in the BECNT series.

Rod Whitacre’s Patristic Greek Reader was recommended by Ben Witherington.

At The Anxious Bench, David Swartz reflected on Why Study History? by John Fea.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Abram K-J, at Words on the Word, reviewed Steve Moyise’s Jesus and Scripture.

At The Christian Manifesto, Calvin Moore reviewed The End of Apologetics by Myron Penner.

Phil Long reviewed Darrell Bock’s Jesus according to Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 24, 2014

Cover ArtJonathan Pennington, author of Reading the Gospels Wisely, was interviewed by Matthew Montonini at New Testament Perspectives.

James K.A. Smith wrote a response to the recent critique of Imagining the Kingdom published in Books & Culture.

Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books included Imagining the Kingdom by James K. A. Smith,  God’s Good World by Jonathan R. Wilson, and Why Study History? by John Fea in his Hearts & Minds Best Books of 2013 – Part One.

Hearts & Minds Best Books of 2013 – Part Two included Journey toward Justice by Nicholas Wolterstorff, Teenagers Matter by Mark Cannister, and Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

At RBL, Teresa Okure reviewed The Christ of the Miracle Stories by Wendy Cotter.

Jackson Watts, of the Helwys Society Forum, reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

John Walker reviewed Thomas Guarino’s Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, at Freedom in Orthodoxy.

At Unsettled Christianity, Joel Watts reviewed Lee McDonald’s The Story of Jesus in History and Faith.

John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew was reviewed by Brian LePort, at Near Emmaus.

Scott Klingsmith reviewed James Ware’s Paul and the Mission of the Church for the Denver Seminary blog.

Nijay K. Gupta’s post New Testament Scholarship: 50 Books Everyone Should Read (Part 1: Gospels), included Miracles by Craig Keener.

Postliberal Theology and the Church Catholic, edited by John Wright, and Another Reformation by Peter Ochs, were reviewed by Joseph Mangina for The Living Church.

Our monthly newsletter, E-Notes, was released this week.

——–

eBook Special

Through Thursday, January 30, the eBook of Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel is available for $3.99 (86% off) at participating retailers, including:

Amazon
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CBD

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 20, 2013

Justin Taylor interviewed Douglas Moo about his new commentary, the Galatians volume of the BECNT series.

The Reformed Reader reviewed John Fea’s Why Study History?, while Fea challenged the narrative of a ‘War on Christmas’ at the Christian Post.

Tim Challies listed Gene Green’s BECNT volume on Jude and 2 Peter as one of the best commentaries on those books.

Andy Naselli reviewed the 7th Edition of D.A. Carson’s New Testament Commentary Survey.

Brian Renshaw, at NT Exegesis, reviewed How We Got the New Testament, by Stanley Porter.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 29, 2013

Cover ArtSarah Mazengarb reviewed Steven Bouma-Prediger’s For the Beauty of the Earth, at Regent’s Ideas & Media blog.

“Bouma-Prediger suggests we ask not what we should do but who we should be.  Many books addressing the ecological crisis are full of ‘to-do’ lists.  Bouma-Prediger goes deeper, offering a unique way to approach ecological issues that is sustainable and full of vision.  As people understand who they should be—in relationship with God and the world around them—they will begin ‘to do’ what needs to be done, but it will be founded in love and gratitude rather than obligation.”

Leslie Keeney at The Ruthless Monk is in the middle of a series of posts engaging with Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics.

David Haines reviewed Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Nathan Millican shared an excerpt from Thomas Schreiner’s The King In His Beauty.

Steve Bishop at An Accidental Blog reviewed Why Study History? by John Fea.

At Kingdom Living, Matt Dabbs reviewed the Baker Academic Biblical Greek Collection for Logos.

Conrad Yap reviewed The Rebirth of the Church, by Eddie Gibbs, at Panorama of a Book Saint, as did Andy Hassler at the Englewood Review of Books.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 8, 2013

Cover ArtThis month’s Christianity Today cover article “How Lewis Lit the Way to Better Apologetics” is taken from Michael Ward’s essay in Imaginative Apologetics.

“Lewis’s conversion was sparked (humanly speaking) by a long nighttime conversation with J. R. R. Tolkien and Hugo Dyson. They were discussing Christianity, metaphor, and myth. In a letter to Arthur Greeves (dated October 18, 1931), Lewis recounted the conversation. It is clear that questions of meaning—that is to say, of imagination—were at the heart of it.

At that point, Lewis’s problem with Christianity was fundamentally imaginative. ‘What has been holding me back . . . has not been so much a difficulty in believing as a difficulty in knowing what the doctrine meant,’ he told Greeves. Tolkien and Dyson showed him that Christian doctrines are not the main thing about Christianity. Instead, doctrines are translations of what God has expressed in ‘a language more adequate: namely the actual incarnation, crucifixion and resurrection’ of Christ.”

Jonathan Watson at the Logos Academic Blog interviewed Michael Allen, author of Justification and the Gospel.

Larry Hurtado briefly reviewed Craig Keener’s first two volumes on Acts.

Don Garlington reviewed Warren Carter’s Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, for RBL.

At Near Emmaus, Brain LePort reviewed The World of the New Testament, edited by Joel Green and Lee McDonald.

Byron Borger reviewed Journey toward Justice by Nicholas Wolterstorff, for the Hearts & Minds blog.

At For Christ and His Kingdom, Jordan Barrett reviewed Millard Erickson’s Christian Theology, 3rd edition.

Amanda MacInnis recommended The Suffering and Victorious Christ, by Richard Mouw and Douglas Sweeney.

Trent Nicholson reviewed Why Study History?, by John Fea.

Also, John Fea wrote an article titled “Here’s why we’re losing our democratic soul” for PennLive.

Brian at Right Lane Reflections reviewed Desiring the Kingdom, by James K.A. Smith.

At NT Exegesis, Brian Renshaw reviewed the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi.