BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 16, 2015

Cover ArtDaniel Block, author of For the Glory of God, was interviewed at Books at a Glance. You can read part 1 here, and part 2 here.

“The pragmatism of the ‘worship industry’ concerns me. Since our understanding of worship is restricted largely to what we do in church as a community, we devote our energies to making our worship that is attractive especially to the unbelievers and the marginal Christians.

We forget that an audience with God calls for a counter-cultural liturgical vocabulary. In Deuteronomy 12 Moses declares that the forms of true worship may not derive either from our own imaginations (v. 8) or the environment in which we live (vv. 29–31). The object of worship alone (i.e., God) determines the nature and forms of true worship.”

An upcoming Syndicate Symposium will interact with Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite, and Chris Skinner will be one of the participants.

Youth Ministry in the 21st Century, edited by Chap Clark, was reviewed at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Publishers Weekly reviewed The Gospel according to Heretics, by David Wilhite.

“This book is ideal for a scholar seeking to study church history, or an educated layperson wanting to know more about church councils, Gnostics, and modern day Muslims.”

At Reformation 21, Robert Yarbrough reviewed Richard Bauckham’s Gospel of Glory.

James K. A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? was reviewed at Just and Sinner.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 9, 2015

Cover ArtAt Reformedish, Derek Rishmawy discussed the virtue of charitable reading in light of George Hunsinger’s Reading Barth with Charity.

“Principles of moral interpretation such as that of charity have become all the more pressing to adopt and practice as our internet age has pressed even more of our communication to be textually-mediated. We are constantly reading, interpreting, and engaging with the texts of other authors, other citizens of language like ourselves. If we fail to practice charity in interpretation, one of our most socially and morally formative practices, it can’t help but bleed out into other areas of our thought and life.”

The Pastor as Public Theologian, by Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan, was reviewed at AJ Cerda.

Ian Panth, at Pop Christ, continued his review of Inspiration and Incarnation by Peter Enns.

James K.A. Smith – author of numerous books, including Imagining the Kingdom, Who’s Afraid of Relativism? , and the forthcoming You are What You Love from Brazos Press – will be speaking at the Desiring the Kingdom conference and the Center for Pastor Theologians.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 1, 2015

Cover ArtThe Church according to Paul by James Thompson received the 2015 Book of the Year Award from the Academy of Parish Clergy.

We were in unanimous agreement that it is a great resource for working pastors. It is superlative of the best work coming out of biblical studies, because it is not written simply for the academy’s ivory tower but for the sake of the church.

Dave Hershey reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Jennifer Guo reviewed Reformed Catholicity by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

Spencer Robinson, at Spoiled Milks, reviewed Frank Thielman’s BECNT volume on Ephesians.

Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek and John Dobson’s Learn New Testament Greek were recommended at Credo Magazine.

Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea was reviewed by Blair Smith at Reformation 21.

Gloria Furman, at The Gospel Coalition, is reading The King in His Beauty by Tom Schreiner, Let the Nations Be Glad by John Piper, and A New Testament Biblical Theology by G. K. Beale.

D. A. Carson was interviewed on Point of View about his new book Praying with Paul, which Point of View also reviewed.

Rob Johnston, author of God’s Wider Presence, was invited to give a series of lectures on faith and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary. You can find the videos here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 17, 2015

Cover ArtAt RBL, Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed by Trent Butler (here) and Wilhelm Wessels (here).

This is a book that exudes so much knowledge about matters pertaining to the Hebrew Bible and wisdom about life that it should be read by academics, theologians, seminary teachers, and also ministers in the Christian tradition.

There were a number of reviews and reflections on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker this week, including: The Heavy Laden Bookshelf, Relevant Magazine, Lutheran Confessions, Youth Front, and an interview at Premier Youthwork.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Peter Oakes’ new Paideia commentary on Galatians.

Let me say, as someone who has read every single word of this fine volume, that it is a “must-have.”

James, at Thoughts, Prayers & Songs, reviewed God’s Wider Presence by Robert Johnston.

Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship was reviewed by Lee Jefferson at Marginalia and by Larry Hurtado.

Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher- Walls was reviewed at Conversation in Faith.

Books at a Glance shared an excerpt from D.A. Carson’s Praying with Paul.

James K. A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? and J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth made the sort list for this year’s Word Awards.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 27, 2015

Cover ArtSamuel Wells, at The Christian Century, reviewed James K. A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Smith perceives the preponderance of American Christians as people bent on security, comfort, and autonomy….For such Christians, truth is equated with terms like absolute and objective, words that turn Christianity into a mechanism for achieving all-seeing impregnability. In order to preserve the power and privilege such a perspective is designed to secure, it’s necessary—at all costs—to hold on to representational notions of truth.

At Credo Magazine, Jeff Straub reviewed Why Study History? by John Fea (page 58).

Paul D. Adams, at In Christ, reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Always Have a Reason, J.W. Wartick shared a quote from Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, edited by Hans Madueme and Michael Reeves.

Keith Simon, at Every Square Inch, reflected on Bryan Litfin’s Early Christian Martyr Stories in light of the recent killing of 21 Coptic Christians.

The Gospel Coalition shared an excerpt from D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul, and released a video promo about the Praying with Paul study curriculum and discussion guide.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 14, 2014

Cover ArtByron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, praised Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

“It may be that the just released A New Heaven and a New Earth…is the most important book in its field, a magnificent, innovative, lasting contribution to the field of Biblical studies. I can hardly overstate just how significant this new book is.”

Graham Twelftree’s Paul and the Miraculous was reviewed by Brian LePort, who also reflected on Twelftree’s discussion of the Pseudepigraphal Paul.

At Lonely Vocations, Matthew Forrest Lowe reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight ‘s post Teaching Discipleship to Youth continued his series on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

CHOICE recommended Beginning with the Word by Roger Lundin, and Who’s Afraid of Relativism? by James K.A. Smith. You can read the respective reviews here and here.

At Shared Justice, Becca Mcbride reflected on Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice.

And finally, James K.A. Smith responded to a common critique of Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

“When one is committed to a representationalist picture of the world—indeed, when one has basically drunk in such a picture with mother’s milk—it is virtually impossible to see things otherwise: This is how things are! Questioning representation and correspondence would be akin to questioning reality itself. Indeed, not only are alternatives not entertained; they cannot even be understood.”

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 7, 2014

Cover ArtIn the latest issue of Biblotheca Sacra, Glenn Kreider reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism, which he “highly recommended,” and Kreider also reviewed Imagining the Kingdom.

“This is an excellent book, a profound theological evaluation of worship. It should be required reading for every pastor or minister, especially those who lead worship.”

Jacob Prahlow, at Pursuing Veritas, reviewed The Church According to Paul by James Thompson.

Hans Madueme, coeditor of Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, was interviewed by Phillip Newman at Covenant College.

At KFUO, Andrew Root was interviewed about his new book Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Brett David Potter, at The Other Journal, reflected on Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life.

At ἐνθύμησις, Jacob Cerone began a series on Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

At Euangelion, Michael Bird announced Simon Gathercole’s forthcoming Defending Substitution.

Byron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, is excited to read God’s Wider Presence by Robert Johnston.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 25, 2014

Cover ArtDavid Koyzis, at Christian Courier, reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

“Readers have come to appreciate the wisdom and insight that Skillen has displayed in his work over the years. This new book certainly lives up to our expectations. The Good of Politics is a biblically and historically rich primer on the political life for everyone persuaded that the claims of Christ extend to our calling as citizens.”

Also reviewing The Good of Politics, Tim Hoiland for The Englewood Review of Books.

Richard G. Smith reviewed Tremper Longman’s commentary on Job, for RBL.

Mark Votava, at Culture of Imagination, reviewed Where Mortals Dwell by Craig Bartholomew.

At Evangelicals for Social Action, Bryan Stafford reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel. Look to the comments for a response by Nation.

Joshua Torrey, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed The New Testament and Ethics, edited by Joel Green.

James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Phil Newton reviewed Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching for 9 Marks.

Tim Ghali, at Black Coffee Reflections, reviewed the Church and Postmodern Culture series.

Douglas Moo was interviewed by the Logos Academic Blog about his Galatians volume in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 3, 2014

Cover ArtJohn Walker, at Freedom in Orthodoxy, reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

“[I]f the church were to heed Smith’s warnings she would grow serious about cultural formation, developing a rich liturgical life, replete with rituals, fasts, and festivities. She would understand her purpose as, most basically, to be herself. To be a witness to the gospel in a world that knows not God. She would understand that Christian particularity is not something to be downplayed, but embraced, for it is only in our particularity that we have anything to offer the world.”

Tim Hoiland reviewed Journey toward Justice, by Nicholas Wolterstorff.

Biblical Preaching, by Haddon Robinson, was reviewed at the Young Restless and Reformed Blog.

Stanley Hauerwas, author of War and the American Difference and With the Grain of the Universe, has been appointed to a Chair in Theological Ethics at the University of Aberdeen.

Dean Borgman, author of Foundations for Youth Ministry, was interviewed by Youth Specialties.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, interviewed Daniel Kirk, author of Jesus have I Loved, but Paul?, as part of his ongoing “Aha” Moments series.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 27, 2014

Cover ArtDenis Fortin reviewed Robin Jensen’s Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity for RBL.

“Jensen does a magnificent job of presenting these five core motifs of baptism in early Christian documents and art. Her excellent knowledge of ancient literature is evident and her analysis of art forms very enlightening….Any student of early church history and theology will appreciate its value.”

Also at RBL, Abson Joseph reviewed the third edition of Encountering the New Testament, by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Reading the Historical Books, by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Andrew Marr reviewed David Neville’s A Peaceable Hope.

At Analogical Thoughts, James Anderson reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

James K.A. Smith, author of Who’s Afraid of Relativism? and Imagining the Kingdom, wrote Steadfast Principles in a Changing World as part of a New York Times series on Christianity and Capitalism.

Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, were recommended in the Pastors Today article How to Find a Good Commentary.

An excerpt from Mark Cannister’s Teenagers Matter was shared in Outreach Magazine.

Haddon Robinson, author of Biblical Preaching, was interviewed by Ministry Magazine.

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was recommended in Catalyst’s Summer Reading list.