BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 20, 2015

Cover ArtIntroducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda, was reviewed on Odd Is The New Normal.

What this book does, in its amazing depth of research, is gather together thousands of years of theology and tradition into a single place…You can tell that this book was coauthored by teachers (good teachers) in their ability to organize and present such complicated material in a manner that is approachable and enlightening.

Bob on Books reviewed Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation by Matthew Levering.

Todd Johnson and Cindy Wu, co-authors of Our Global Families, wrote a guest post for A. J. Jacobs’ Global Family Reunion.

At Transpositions, Brett Speakman reviewed Jonathan Wilson’s God’s Good World.

Jordan Hillebert, at Reformation 21, reviewed Atonement, Law and Justice by Adonis Vidu.

At Pursuing Veritas, Jacob Prahlow reviewed Thomas O’Loughlin’s The Didache.

Asbury Journal reviewed The Story of Jesus in History and Faith by Lee Martin McDonald, Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist, Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, Simon Peter in Scripture and Memory by Markus Bockmuehl, and The End of Apologetics by Myron Penner.

At Solidarity Hall, John Medaille wrote Pop Culture and Total War, a reflection on Daniel Bell’s The Economy of Desire.

Andrew Root, author of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, was interviewed on Dr. Bill Maier Live.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 13, 2015

Cover ArtThe Englewood Review of Books reviewed From Every Tribe and Nation by Mark Noll.

Noll’s memoir of discovery calls our attention to the infinitely larger story of global Christianity. May it inspire us to appreciate and share God’s heart for his people whom he is gathering to himself from every tribe and nation.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek, and reflected on evangelism and community in light of James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Mark Gignilliat at Reformation 21, and by Patrick Schreiner at Ad Fontes.

Library Journal reviewed Charles Farhadian’s forthcoming Introducing World Religions, and Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott.

Jeffrey Weima’s BECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians was reviewed at the Young Restless Reformed Blog.

At Blogging Theologically, Aaron Armstrong reflected on the first volume of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Shelby Etheridge reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for The Presbyterian Outlook.

At The Living Church, George Sumner reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Drew Trotter reviewed Robert Johnston’s God’s Wider Presence for the Consortium of Christian Study Centers.

A Farewell with Thanks from the Church and Postmodern Culture blog.

Daniel Block, author of For the Glory of God, recently gave a lecture on worship at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 9, 2015

Cover ArtDerek Rishmawy, at The Gospel Coalition, explains “Why You Should Read Bavinck.”

“Bavinck’s accomplishment in the Dogmatics is nothing short of jaw-dropping. The expansive, nuanced, and deeply trinitarian theological vision is both intellectually challenging and spiritually nourishing. I anticipate turning to these volumes regularly in the years to come.”

Reviews

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed at Euangelion.

Craig Blomberg reviewed A Peaceable Hope by David Neville, as well as The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, for the Denver Journal here and here.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Exploring Psychology and Christian Faith, by Paul Moes and Donald Tellinghuisen.

Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite was reviewed at CHOICE connect.

At Discovering the Mission of God, Ed reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed at Diglotting.

Michael Philliber, at Deus Misereatur, reviewed The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

Best Of

As 2014 came to a close, quite a number of Baker Academic titles were featured in “Best of” posts.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, John Frederick, Scott Hafemann and N.T. Wright, was named as one of “The Top (Mockingbird) Theology Books of 2014.”

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta listed Chris Keith’s Jesus Against the Scribal Elite, Galatians and Christian Theology, Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth among the “Best New Testament Academic Books of 2014.”

Women in the World of the Earliest Christians by Lynn Cohick, Wealth and Poverty in Early Church and Society edited by Susan Holman, Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey, The Economy of Desire by Daniel Bell, and Loving the Poor, Saving the Rich by Helen Rhee were all in Alvin Rapien’s “Top 10 Books of 2014.”

The Missio Alliance Essential Reading List of 2014” featured Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At Reformation 21, Michael Allen and Scott Swain’s Reformed Catholicity, Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution, Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan’s The Pastor as Public Theologian, and Richard Bauckham’s Gospel of Glory were noted as “New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.”

Elsewhere

Scot McKnight reflected on Alistair Stewart’s The Original Bishops in the post “Paul and the Economic Justice Vision of Jesus“, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth led to his discussion “Revolution in Eschatology Today?

Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, wrote “Incarnation and Epiphany: How Christmas became a Christian Feast” for ABC Religion and Ethics.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 12, 2014

Cover ArtMark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation was recommended by Robert Tracy McKenzie at Faith and History.

“It’s essentially the story of his personal spiritual and intellectual journey, with an emphasis on the way that Noll’s engagement with Christianity in other parts of the world has deepened his faith. But as every historian knows, you can visit foreign countries by traveling through time as well as space. Noll illustrates that truth wonderfully in the book’s second chapter, ‘Rescued by the Reformation.’”

At Crux Sola, Christopher Skinner recommended Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, edited by Christopher Hays and Christopher Ansberry.

Rodney Clapp, at Running Heads, reflected on holistic eschatology and J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott, was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N.T. Wright, and John Frederick, was reviewed at ἐνθύμησις.

Ed Smither reviewed Scott Sunquist’s Understanding Christian Mission.

Steven Bouma-Prediger, author of For the Beauty of the Earth, wrote the article “Trees, Healing, and Hope” for Sojourners.

David Gowler, who is writing a book on the reception history of the parables, celebrated the one year anniversary of his blog A Chorus of Voices.

At Reformedish, Derek Rishmawy recommended Adonis Vidu’s Atonement, Law, and Justice as one of his 5 Best Books of 2014.

At First Things, Wesley Hill recommended Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology.

J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth, and Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, were named as Jesus Creed Books of the Year by Scot McKnight.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 26, 2014

Cover ArtAt First Things, Peter Leithart reviewed Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship.

“Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship is a very fine introduction to the subject. Though it is up-to-date academically, and, as McGowan says, includes the results of some of his own research, it is accessibly written, clearly organized, and highly informative.”

Dan Miller, at the Calvin history department’s Historical Horizons blog, reviewed The Good of Politics, by James Skillen.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta shared part one of his review of James Thompson’s The Church according to Paul.

G. Wright Doyle, at the Global China Center, reviewed Understanding Christian Mission, by Scott Sunquist.

Abram K-J, at Words on the Word, recommended Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Michael Hansen reflected on James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Larry Hurtado discussed major commentaries on Acts, including the third volume of Craig Keener’s Acts: An Exegetical Commentary.

At Euangelion, Joel Willitts recommended Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 22, 2014

Cover ArtWesley Ellis, at Living in the Kingdom, reviewed Andrew Root’s forthcoming Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“Root looks to present Bonhoeffer’s youth ministry as a consistent lens for understanding his development of thought. Bonhoeffer’s theology didn’t develop out of the ether, but emerged from his relationships and from his engagement in the concrete lived experience of the young people to whom he ministered throughout his life.”

The Bible Gateway Blog interviewed Patricia Dutcher-Walls, author of Reading the Historical Books.

A number of Baker Academic titles were reviewed in the latest volume of Themelios, including:

Jennifer Guo reviewed Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life.

At The Poor in Spirit Alvin Rapien interviewed Daniel Bell, author of The Economy of Desire.

Kevin Davis, at After Existentialism, Light, reflected on Christopher Seitz’s The Character of Christian Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 9, 2014

Cover ArtJoey Cochran reviewed Douglas Moo’s Galatians BECNT volume.

“Moo’s commentary on Galatians is a ballast for pastors wishing to faithfully exegete the message of this letter. You will not be disappointed in this commentary. You’ll find yourself consulting Moo’s commentary on Galatians endlessly as you preach through Paul’s earliest and seminal letter.”

At Zwinglius Redivivus, Jim West reviewed Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite.

Matthew Gilbert, at Theology Matters, reviwed Why Study History? by John Fea.

Why Study History? was also featured at Chris Gehrz’s blog, The Pietist Schoolman, in the posts Two (or Three) Why’s of History, and History as a “Ministry of Listening.”

Scot McKnight recommended J. Richard Middleton’s The Liberating Image.

Alex Farrell, at Transpositions, reflected on Creator Spirit by Steve Guthrie.

Scott Sunquist, author of Understanding Christian Mission, was interviewed on the Compassion Radio Podcast.

At The Southern Blog, Thomas Schreiner discussed his book The King in His Beauty.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 13, 2013

Congratulations to Myron Penner (The End of Apologetics), Scott Sunquist (Understanding Christian Mission), and Steven Boyer and Christopher Hall (The Mystery of God) on being winners in the 2014 Christianity Today Book Awards!

At Englewood Review of Books, Andy Hassler reviewed The Rebirth of the Church, by Eddie Gibbs.

David Johnson reviewed Graham Twelftree’s Paul and the Miraculous, for Renewal Dynamics.

At Freedom in Orthodoxy, Johnny Walker interviewed Chris Keith about his forthcoming work, Jesus Against the Scribal Elite.

Matthew Montonini, at New Testament Perspectives, is looking forward to Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

Noah Berlatsky reflected on War and the American Difference, by Stanley Hauerwas.

At The Gospel Coalition, Matt Smethurst lists Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty as a one of the best books of 2013.

Tim Challies recommended the Song of Songs volume by Richard Hess in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms.

And Matthew Dowling at Desposyni included With the Grain of the Universe, by Stanley Hauerwas; Christian Theology 3rd edition, by Millard Erickson; and Justification and the Gospel, by R. Michael Allen, in his “Theologian’s Guide to Christmas Gifting”.

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eBook Special

Through Thursday, December 19, the eBook of Proclaiming the Scandal of the Cross by Mark Baker is available for $3.99 (82% off) at participating retailers, including:

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Video: Scott Sunquist on Understanding Christian Mission (Part 2)

Connecting Mission and Spiritual Formation

Understanding Christian Mission in the Classroom

Mission, Missions, & Missional

About the Book:

Cover ArtThis comprehensive introduction helps students, pastors, and mission committees understand contemporary Christian mission historically, biblically, and theologically. Scott Sunquist, a respected scholar and teacher of world Christianity, recovers missiological thinking from the early church for the twenty-first century. He traces the mission of the church throughout history in order to address the global church and offers a constructive theology and practice for missionary work today.

“Scott Sunquist has produced a rarity in this book that combines breadth of theological scope with depth of learning and life in equal measure. This wonderful compendium brings together deep biblical reflection, the wisdom of Christian ages past, and the experience of a lifetime lived in mission. This is a book to savor, ponder, and return to again and again.”–Christopher J. H. Wright, international ministries director, Langham Partnership

For more information on Understanding Christian Mission, click here.

Theology Starts with Mission, an Excerpt from Understanding Christian Mission

The following is an excerpt from the first chapter of Understanding Christian Mission, by Scott Sunquist.

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Cover ArtTheology Starts with Mission

Missiological reflection is both the context of all theology and the first movement in theological reflection. This understanding of theology as coming out of the reflection of the faith on the frontiers of faith is commonly accepted today. The earliest Christian theological reflections are found in the New Testament. Luke’s two-part volume was written while on a missionary journey. Paul’s letter to the Romans was written to prepare the way for his missionary visit to Rome, as he passed through on his way to Spain. He wrote theology as a church planter, “on a mission.” In fact, each of the New Testament writings comes out of the missionary engagement of the church with the world.

Therefore, it is necessary to have a missional hermeneutic for reading the Bible—but especially for reading the New Testament. The New Testament writings were reflections on missiological praxis.

As we move out of the earliest period of Christian writings and into the second and third centuries, we discover that these writings also come out of the context of a missionary engagement. Most of the major Christian writings of this period are apologetic in nature, either addressed to people in authority defending the Christian belief and cause or written to strengthen the Christian community in its witness to the broader culture. Origen’s famous response to Celsus’s attacks on Christianity (Contra Celsum) is quite typical of the period; theological awareness, reflection, and writing are based in the missionary encounter. This has always been the case, and it is still the case today. “Mission is the mother of theology,” as well as the mother of the New Testament texts.

Neither the second- and third-century writers, nor the New Testament writers, were systematic theologians sitting in ivy-covered citadels contemplating the character and will of God. They were persecuted, hurried, and harried apostles (read “missionaries”) challenging the religious, political, and social structures of their time—proclaiming a Kingdom that was above all kingdoms and authorities of this world. It was this mission that birthed biblical and theological reflection.

©2013 by Scott Sunquist. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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To read more from this excerpt click here.

For more information on Understanding Christian Mission, click here.