BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 2, 2014

Cover ArtMichael Bird reviewed Stanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament.

“Porter is a recognized expert on biblical Greek, papyrology, and epigraphy, and therefore, this book reflects his wealth of knowledge in those areas ….[D]efinitely worth reading and to recommend to students.”

At Mundus Reconciliatus Ecclesia, Joshua Luper reflected on Jesus the Temple by Nicholas Perrin.

Stephanie Bliese recommended a number of Baker Academic titles in her Christian Theologian’s Reading List, including:

At Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, Nick Norelli reviewed the Logos edition of Craig Keener’s Acts commentary.

Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, by Thomas Guarino, was awarded the 2014 Paradosis Center Book Prize.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 24, 2014

Cover ArtJonathan Pennington, author of Reading the Gospels Wisely, was interviewed by Matthew Montonini at New Testament Perspectives.

James K.A. Smith wrote a response to the recent critique of Imagining the Kingdom published in Books & Culture.

Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books included Imagining the Kingdom by James K. A. Smith,  God’s Good World by Jonathan R. Wilson, and Why Study History? by John Fea in his Hearts & Minds Best Books of 2013 – Part One.

Hearts & Minds Best Books of 2013 – Part Two included Journey toward Justice by Nicholas Wolterstorff, Teenagers Matter by Mark Cannister, and Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

At RBL, Teresa Okure reviewed The Christ of the Miracle Stories by Wendy Cotter.

Jackson Watts, of the Helwys Society Forum, reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

John Walker reviewed Thomas Guarino’s Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, at Freedom in Orthodoxy.

At Unsettled Christianity, Joel Watts reviewed Lee McDonald’s The Story of Jesus in History and Faith.

John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew was reviewed by Brian LePort, at Near Emmaus.

Scott Klingsmith reviewed James Ware’s Paul and the Mission of the Church for the Denver Seminary blog.

Nijay K. Gupta’s post New Testament Scholarship: 50 Books Everyone Should Read (Part 1: Gospels), included Miracles by Craig Keener.

Postliberal Theology and the Church Catholic, edited by John Wright, and Another Reformation by Peter Ochs, were reviewed by Joseph Mangina for The Living Church.

Our monthly newsletter, E-Notes, was released this week.

——–

eBook Special

Through Thursday, January 30, the eBook of Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel is available for $3.99 (86% off) at participating retailers, including:

Amazon
Apple
Barnes & Noble
CBD

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 27, 2013

Cover ArtThomas Guarino, author of Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, wrote the First Things article “Pope Francis Looks to St. Vincent of Lérins.”

“The pope rightly notes that St. Vincent compares the growth of doctrine to the gradual development whereby a child becomes an adult. Vincent’s (and Francis’) point, of course, is that over the years there occurs a refinement, maturation, and ripening of Christian doctrine.”

Derek Rishmawy shared A Prayer for Preachers and The 3:00 A.M. Test For Preaching from Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching.

In his post “’Sola Scriptura,’ ‘Prima Scriptura,’ or ‘Scriptura et Doctrina’?” Nijay Gupta referenced Scripture and Tradition, by Edith Humphrey.

Kent Sparks’s God’s Word in Human Words was used by Peter Enns in his post “Is God restricted by what the Bible says?”

Kevin DeYoung wishes he had time to read Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty.

John Fea has been doing a series of posts on Why Study History? sightings.

Daniel Kirk, author of Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?, was interviewed by Tripp Fuller on Homebrewed Christianity.

The Maxwell Institute Podcast interviewed Myron Penner about his recent book, The End of Apologetics.

New Release: Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine

The theology of Vincent of Lérins is often reduced to a memorable slogan: “We hold that faith which has been believed everywhere, always, and by everyone.” Thomas Guarino argues that this “Vincentian canon” has frequently been taken out of context. This book introduces Vincent’s thought and its reception in Christian history, exploring Vincent’s creative and innovative understanding of the development of doctrine and showing how it informed the thought of John Henry Newman. Guarino contends that Vincent’s theology contributes significantly to theology and ecumenism in the twenty-first century.

The volume is the second in a series on the church fathers edited by Hans Boersma and Matthew Levering.

“Routinely cited and just as routinely dismissed for allegedly holding that authentic doctrine simply never changes, Vincent here comes to life as a much more complex and theologically imposing figure who articulated sophisticated criteria for ensuring both the conservation and the authentic development of Christian doctrine. This is historical theology at its finest and most relevant.”
Khaled Anatolios

“Any student of theology interested in the problem of the development of doctrine must take seriously the full measure of Guarino’s carefully researched book. He not only provides us with brilliant historical scholarship but also demonstrates the enduring pertinence of the Vincentian Canon, which is too often reduced to a catchphrase. This volume is a splendid example of authentic ressourcement.”
Lawrence S. Cunningham

Thomas G. Guarino (STD, Catholic University of America) is professor of systematic theology at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. He is the author of several books, including Vattimo and Theology and Foundations of Systematic Theology.

For more information about Vincent of Lérins, click here.