BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 1, 2015

Cover ArtThe Church according to Paul by James Thompson received the 2015 Book of the Year Award from the Academy of Parish Clergy.

We were in unanimous agreement that it is a great resource for working pastors. It is superlative of the best work coming out of biblical studies, because it is not written simply for the academy’s ivory tower but for the sake of the church.

Dave Hershey reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Jennifer Guo reviewed Reformed Catholicity by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

Spencer Robinson, at Spoiled Milks, reviewed Frank Thielman’s BECNT volume on Ephesians.

Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek and John Dobson’s Learn New Testament Greek were recommended at Credo Magazine.

Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea was reviewed by Blair Smith at Reformation 21.

Gloria Furman, at The Gospel Coalition, is reading The King in His Beauty by Tom Schreiner, Let the Nations Be Glad by John Piper, and A New Testament Biblical Theology by G. K. Beale.

D. A. Carson was interviewed on Point of View about his new book Praying with Paul, which Point of View also reviewed.

Rob Johnston, author of God’s Wider Presence, was invited to give a series of lectures on faith and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary. You can find the videos here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 30, 2015

Cover ArtMathew Sims, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed James K. A. Smith’s Imagining the Kingdom.

I cannot recommend Imagining the Kingdom highly enough. It’s a much needed corrective for the Church especially in our current climate where secular liturgies often are more formative. Christians have failed to tell and live our story in a way that’s believable and affective.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight reflected on Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation by Matthew Levering.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

At Books at a Glance, Adam Darbonne reviewed Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Jackson Watts, at the Helwys Society Forum, reviewed Beth Felker Jones’ Practicing Christian Doctrine.

Adonis Vidu’s Atonement, Law, and Justice was review at Pastor Dave Online.

Gary Ridley, at Send U, reviewed Effective Intercultural Communication by A. Scott Moreau, Evvy Hay Campbell and Susan Greener.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, is looking forward to Mikeal Parsons’ Paideia commentary on Luke.

Justin Taylor shared Thomas Schreiner’s reflections in The King in His Beauty on seeing the Trinity in Genesis 1:26.

At Lingering in Love, Ian McConnell has been working through Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, and Bonhoeffer’s eight theses on youth work. Read posts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

The Gospel Coalition shared 8 Lessons from the School of Prayer, an excerpt from D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 9, 2015

Cover ArtDerek Rishmawy, at The Gospel Coalition, explains “Why You Should Read Bavinck.”

“Bavinck’s accomplishment in the Dogmatics is nothing short of jaw-dropping. The expansive, nuanced, and deeply trinitarian theological vision is both intellectually challenging and spiritually nourishing. I anticipate turning to these volumes regularly in the years to come.”

Reviews

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed at Euangelion.

Craig Blomberg reviewed A Peaceable Hope by David Neville, as well as The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, for the Denver Journal here and here.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Exploring Psychology and Christian Faith, by Paul Moes and Donald Tellinghuisen.

Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite was reviewed at CHOICE connect.

At Discovering the Mission of God, Ed reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed at Diglotting.

Michael Philliber, at Deus Misereatur, reviewed The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

Best Of

As 2014 came to a close, quite a number of Baker Academic titles were featured in “Best of” posts.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, John Frederick, Scott Hafemann and N.T. Wright, was named as one of “The Top (Mockingbird) Theology Books of 2014.”

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta listed Chris Keith’s Jesus Against the Scribal Elite, Galatians and Christian Theology, Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth among the “Best New Testament Academic Books of 2014.”

Women in the World of the Earliest Christians by Lynn Cohick, Wealth and Poverty in Early Church and Society edited by Susan Holman, Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey, The Economy of Desire by Daniel Bell, and Loving the Poor, Saving the Rich by Helen Rhee were all in Alvin Rapien’s “Top 10 Books of 2014.”

The Missio Alliance Essential Reading List of 2014” featured Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At Reformation 21, Michael Allen and Scott Swain’s Reformed Catholicity, Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution, Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan’s The Pastor as Public Theologian, and Richard Bauckham’s Gospel of Glory were noted as “New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.”

Elsewhere

Scot McKnight reflected on Alistair Stewart’s The Original Bishops in the post “Paul and the Economic Justice Vision of Jesus“, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth led to his discussion “Revolution in Eschatology Today?

Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, wrote “Incarnation and Epiphany: How Christmas became a Christian Feast” for ABC Religion and Ethics.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 15, 2014

Cover ArtBruce Ellis Benson, author of Liturgy as a Way of Life, was interviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor in Spirit.

“What is liturgy? Probably the simplest way of answering that is that it all about how we live our lives. We have routines; we have ways of doing things; we have things that are essential to our lives. How we order our lives has to do with what we value. So, far from being just some kind of thing that “liturgical churches” do, liturgy is something that we cannot help but do on a daily basis.”

The Verbum Blog interviewed Mary Healy and Peter Williamson, editors of the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture series and authors of the volumes on The Gospel of Mark and Ephesians. Read part one and part two of their discussion.

Hoon Lee, at Exploring Church History, reviewed Timothy Wengert’s Reading the Bible with Martin Luther.

At Panorama of a Book Saint, Conrade Yap reviewed Encountering the Book of Romans by Douglas Moo.

Conversations in Faith reviewed Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher- Walls.

The Books & Culture Podcast discussed J. Richard Middleton’s forthcoming A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty was reviewed by David Maas for RBL.

Joshua Torrey, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed Clayton Jefford’s Reading the Apostolic Fathers.

Marc Cortez listed Practicing Christian Doctrine by Beth Felker Jones in his post The Best Theology Books from the First Half of 2014.

At Brief Inquisition? Michael Hansen reflected on James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

James Skillen, author of The Good of Politics was interviewed about the conflicts in Iraq, Gaza, and Ukraine by the Christian Courier.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 9, 2014

Cover ArtJoey Cochran reviewed Douglas Moo’s Galatians BECNT volume.

“Moo’s commentary on Galatians is a ballast for pastors wishing to faithfully exegete the message of this letter. You will not be disappointed in this commentary. You’ll find yourself consulting Moo’s commentary on Galatians endlessly as you preach through Paul’s earliest and seminal letter.”

At Zwinglius Redivivus, Jim West reviewed Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite.

Matthew Gilbert, at Theology Matters, reviwed Why Study History? by John Fea.

Why Study History? was also featured at Chris Gehrz’s blog, The Pietist Schoolman, in the posts Two (or Three) Why’s of History, and History as a “Ministry of Listening.”

Scot McKnight recommended J. Richard Middleton’s The Liberating Image.

Alex Farrell, at Transpositions, reflected on Creator Spirit by Steve Guthrie.

Scott Sunquist, author of Understanding Christian Mission, was interviewed on the Compassion Radio Podcast.

At The Southern Blog, Thomas Schreiner discussed his book The King in His Beauty.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 25, 2014

Cover ArtNicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice was reviewed in The Christian Century.

“This book is an extraordinary gift to the church, an invitation into an understanding of the Christian drama that is focused on advocacy for those who are being denied their fundamental value as human beings. Accessible yet demanding, it is a powerful contribution to the literature.”

The latest issue of Themelios includes reviews of a number of Baker Academic titles, including:

Wyatt Graham reviewed Psalms as Torah by Gordon Wenham.

At My Digital Seminary, Lindsay Kennedy reviewed Tremper Longman’s volume on Job in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms.

Bob Hayton, at Fundamentally Reformed, shared a quote from G.K. Beal’s A New Testament Biblical Theology.

Joel Watts, at Unsettled Christianity, reviewed Liturgy as a Way of Life by Bruce Benson.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 21, 2014

Cover ArtThe Good of Politics by James Skillen was extensively reviewed Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

“[I]t is with exceptional gladness that we can here announce the publication of the brand new book by James Skillen, The Good of Politics….In various ways in this important book, Skillen helps us ponder what we mean by ‘public justice’ and the ‘common good’ and ponders essential questions such as how the state – which is God’s good gift to us, not a bad thing — can use legitimate authority to help order our pluralistic political community.”

Billy Kangas at The Orant reviewed Jonathan Wilson’s God’s Good World.

At Everyday Theology, Marc Cortez reflected on discerning God’s work in historical events, and turned to John Fea’s Why Study History?

Also, the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association recently released its list of thirty-six finalists for the 2014 Christian Book Award. We are please to announce that the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi, and The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, have been selected as finalists in the Bible Reference category

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 28, 2014

Cover ArtAt The Englewood Review of Books, Tim Høiland reviewed Reading a Different Story by Susan VanZanten.

“Ultimately, VanZanten is an apologist for ‘Christian cosmopolitanism.’ She wants believers’ allegiances to transcend geopolitical borders. Specifically, she wants us to read widely and well in order to better love God and to love our neighbors, both near and far. While she specifically appeals to her colleagues in academia, the principle applies to the rest of us just as well.”

J. Ryan Parker, at Pop Theology, reviewed Personal Jesus by Clive Marsh and Vaughn Roberts.

Thomas Schreiner’s  The King in His Beauty was reviewed by Lindsay Kennedy at My Digital Seminary.

Chris Kiesling, co-author with David Setran of Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, wrote the article “Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood: Christian Formation and Discipleship” for Catalyst.

Nijay Gupta reflected on a quote about simplicity and complexity from Donald Hagner’s The New Testament.

Video: Thomas Schreiner on The King in His Beauty (Part 2)

Unpacking the Story, Book by Book

The Audience for The King in His Beauty

Cover ArtAbout the Book:

Thomas Schreiner, a respected scholar and a trusted voice for many students and pastors, offers a substantial and accessibly written overview of the whole Bible. He traces the storyline of the scriptures from the standpoint of biblical theology, examining the overarching message that is conveyed throughout. Schreiner emphasizes three interrelated and unified themes that stand out in the biblical narrative: God as Lord, human beings as those who are made in God’s image, and the land or place in which God’s rule is exercised. The goal of God’s kingdom is to see the king in his beauty and to be enraptured in his glory.

For more information on The King in His Beauty, click here.

Video: Thomas Schreiner on The King in His Beauty

What led you to write a Biblical theology?

The Audience for The King in His Beauty

A Story About the Kingdom

Cover ArtAbout the Book:

Thomas Schreiner, a respected scholar and a trusted voice for many students and pastors, offers a substantial and accessibly written overview of the whole Bible. He traces the storyline of the scriptures from the standpoint of biblical theology, examining the overarching message that is conveyed throughout. Schreiner emphasizes three interrelated and unified themes that stand out in the biblical narrative: God as Lord, human beings as those who are made in God’s image, and the land or place in which God’s rule is exercised. The goal of God’s kingdom is to see the king in his beauty and to be enraptured in his glory.

For more information on The King in His Beauty, click here.