BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 15, 2015

Cover ArtScott Swain was interviewed at Logos Reformed about his recent book with Michael Allen, Reformed Catholicity.

Protestants tend to be leery of church confessions, especially when it comes to biblical interpretation, and to believe that the individual’s private judgment about the interpretation of the biblical text is the final court of appeal for theology.

We believe the modern approach to sola scriptura rests upon an unbiblical anthropology and an unbiblical ecclesiology and thus seek to relocate sola Scriptura within the context of a more biblical understanding of humanity and the church.

Also, Michael at Philomythois reflected on the distinction between Sola Scriptura and Solo Scriptura in light of Reformed Catholicity.

Austin Reed, at Reformed Forum, reviewed George Hunsinger’s Reading Barth with Charity.

Pheme Perkins’ First Corinthians volume in the Paideia series was reviewed by H. H. Drake Williams III for RBL.

Publishers Weekly took note of James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul receiving the 2015 Book of the Year Award from the Academy of Parish Clergy, as well as the forthcoming release of The Gospel According to Heretics by David Wilhite.

At ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ, Paul D. Adams discussed The Lure of Buddhism and Harold Netland‘s Christianity and Religious Diversity.

J. Richard Middleton, author of A New Heaven and a New Earth, took part in a discussion on Creation, Violence, and the God of the Old Testament, hosted by the Westminster Theological Centre.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 1, 2015

Cover ArtThe Church according to Paul by James Thompson received the 2015 Book of the Year Award from the Academy of Parish Clergy.

We were in unanimous agreement that it is a great resource for working pastors. It is superlative of the best work coming out of biblical studies, because it is not written simply for the academy’s ivory tower but for the sake of the church.

Dave Hershey reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Jennifer Guo reviewed Reformed Catholicity by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

Spencer Robinson, at Spoiled Milks, reviewed Frank Thielman’s BECNT volume on Ephesians.

Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek and John Dobson’s Learn New Testament Greek were recommended at Credo Magazine.

Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea was reviewed by Blair Smith at Reformation 21.

Gloria Furman, at The Gospel Coalition, is reading The King in His Beauty by Tom Schreiner, Let the Nations Be Glad by John Piper, and A New Testament Biblical Theology by G. K. Beale.

D. A. Carson was interviewed on Point of View about his new book Praying with Paul, which Point of View also reviewed.

Rob Johnston, author of God’s Wider Presence, was invited to give a series of lectures on faith and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary. You can find the videos here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 13, 2015

Cover ArtThe Englewood Review of Books reviewed From Every Tribe and Nation by Mark Noll.

Noll’s memoir of discovery calls our attention to the infinitely larger story of global Christianity. May it inspire us to appreciate and share God’s heart for his people whom he is gathering to himself from every tribe and nation.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek, and reflected on evangelism and community in light of James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Mark Gignilliat at Reformation 21, and by Patrick Schreiner at Ad Fontes.

Library Journal reviewed Charles Farhadian’s forthcoming Introducing World Religions, and Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott.

Jeffrey Weima’s BECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians was reviewed at the Young Restless Reformed Blog.

At Blogging Theologically, Aaron Armstrong reflected on the first volume of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Shelby Etheridge reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for The Presbyterian Outlook.

At The Living Church, George Sumner reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Drew Trotter reviewed Robert Johnston’s God’s Wider Presence for the Consortium of Christian Study Centers.

A Farewell with Thanks from the Church and Postmodern Culture blog.

Daniel Block, author of For the Glory of God, recently gave a lecture on worship at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 8, 2014

Cover ArtAt The Christian Century, Greg Carey reviewed Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite.

“Keith writes with the charm of an excellent classroom teacher: always clear, occasionally hip, and sometimes a little geeky. Any reader who has completed a basic curriculum in the Gospels will enjoy this book, while professional scholars will recognize immediately that Keith is a primary contributor to academic debates. He has earned a reputation as an influential emerging voice in historical Jesus research and an expert on ancient literacy.”

Also reviewing Jesus against the Scribal Elite was Brian LePort.

John Piper reviewed Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

At Reformedish, Derek Rishmawy reviewed Atonement, Law, and Justice by Adonis Vidu.

George P. Wood reviewed Rediscovering an Evangelical Heritage by Donald Dayton with Douglas Strong.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed The Church according to Paul by James Thompson.

At First Things, Peter Leithart reflected on The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

The Englewood Review of Books recommended Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At the Bible Gateway Blog, Jonathan Petersen interviewed David Bauer about his book (together with the late Dr. Robert Traina), Inductive Bible Study.

Mark Kiessling, at the LCMS Leader Blog, interviewed Andrew Root and discussed his new book, Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 7, 2014

Cover ArtIn the latest issue of Biblotheca Sacra, Glenn Kreider reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism, which he “highly recommended,” and Kreider also reviewed Imagining the Kingdom.

“This is an excellent book, a profound theological evaluation of worship. It should be required reading for every pastor or minister, especially those who lead worship.”

Jacob Prahlow, at Pursuing Veritas, reviewed The Church According to Paul by James Thompson.

Hans Madueme, coeditor of Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, was interviewed by Phillip Newman at Covenant College.

At KFUO, Andrew Root was interviewed about his new book Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Brett David Potter, at The Other Journal, reflected on Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life.

At ἐνθύμησις, Jacob Cerone began a series on Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

At Euangelion, Michael Bird announced Simon Gathercole’s forthcoming Defending Substitution.

Byron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, is excited to read God’s Wider Presence by Robert Johnston.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 26, 2014

Cover ArtAt First Things, Peter Leithart reviewed Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship.

“Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship is a very fine introduction to the subject. Though it is up-to-date academically, and, as McGowan says, includes the results of some of his own research, it is accessibly written, clearly organized, and highly informative.”

Dan Miller, at the Calvin history department’s Historical Horizons blog, reviewed The Good of Politics, by James Skillen.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta shared part one of his review of James Thompson’s The Church according to Paul.

G. Wright Doyle, at the Global China Center, reviewed Understanding Christian Mission, by Scott Sunquist.

Abram K-J, at Words on the Word, recommended Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Michael Hansen reflected on James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Larry Hurtado discussed major commentaries on Acts, including the third volume of Craig Keener’s Acts: An Exegetical Commentary.

At Euangelion, Joel Willitts recommended Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

A Local and Universal Church – an Excerpt from The Church According to Paul

Cover ArtThe following is an excerpt from The Church According to Paul, by James Thompson.

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The dialectic between the local and universal church provides a significant model for today. The local congregation remains the locus of Christian participation in the body of Christ. In the local congregation, believers are being transformed together into the image of Christ. They rejoice with those who rejoice and weep with those who weep (cf. Rom. 12:15), put love into practice through acts of mercy, and encourage each other. The local church provides a place to belong in a society in which individuals are commonly uprooted from their primary relationships.

The local congregation is also a place for the care of the most vulnerable in the society—the aged, the lonely, those with special needs. The local congregation is small enough to recognize the special needs of its members but large enough to do for individuals what they cannot do for themselves. It is not a corporation interested only in numbers but a family in which siblings care for each other. Nor is it a theater for entertaining attendees; rather, it is a body in which all participate. Although churches often fall short of their essential task, many communities continue to provide this place to belong.

This dialectic between the local and the universal church precludes the insular focus of the local congregation that is concerned only for its own welfare. Paul’s model of cooperation among churches in the region and in distant places is a reminder that the competition between the churches and the struggle for market share in metropolitan areas undermines the united witness of the churches. The competition among churches that results in appealing to consumer tastes is consistent with the spirit of capitalism, but not with the ecclesial vision that Paul offers. Paul’s ecclesiology involves the cooperative work of churches in the city, the region, and the world.

©2014 by James W. Thompson. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on The Church According to Paul, click here.

New Release: The Church According to Paul

Cover ArtAmid conflicting ideas about what the church should be and do in a post-Christian climate, the missing voice is that of Paul. The New Testament’s most prolific church planter, Paul faced diverse challenges as he worked to form congregations.

In The Church According to Paul, leading biblical scholar James Thompson examines Paul’s ministry of planting and nurturing churches in the pre-Christian world to offer guidance for the contemporary church. He also addresses contemporary (mis)understandings of words like missional, megachurch, and formation.

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“Always with one foot planted firmly in the academy and the other in the church, James Thompson has given us a highly insightful, theologically rich, and timely study of the apostle Paul’s view of the church–one of the best Pauline ecclesiologies in print….This excellent volume should be studied not only by students of Paul but also by all who are (rightly) concerned about the identity and mission of the church today.” – Michael J. Gorman, St. Mary’s Seminary & University

“Diagnoses of the church’s problems and prescriptions for its flourishing abound. As James Thompson wisely observes, however, most contemporary discussion of the church shows little evidence of engagement with the letters of Paul. In this careful volume, Thompson studies the church in Paul’s words and his work, in the hope that Paul’s rich wisdom might have its rightful place in contemporary Christian reflection.” – Beverly Roberts Gaventa, Baylor University

“According to Thompson, the crisis facing the Western church is not its survival but rediscovering its purpose. Probing the theological depths of Paul, this book offers a model for the contemporary church….Essential reading for those seeking a model for the contemporary church that is scripturally informed.” – Graham H. Twelftree, Regent University

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James W. Thompson (PhD, Vanderbilt University) is scholar in residence at the Graduate School of Theology at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, Texas. He is the editor of Restoration Quarterly and the author of numerous books, including Moral Formation according to Paul, Pastoral Ministry according to Paul, Preaching like Paul, and Hebrews in Paideia: Commentaries on the New Testament.

For more information on The Church According to Paulclick here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 29, 2014

Cover ArtThe Christian Century recently featured Meeting God at the Movies, an excerpt from Robert Johnston’s forthcoming God’s Wider Presence.

“Few in the church have been encouraged to think theologically about encounters with God that take place outside the church and its scripture. The result is a disconnect between how the church speaks formally of God’s self-revelation and how those who are not Christians speak of that same reality.”

Nijay Gupta shared a brief review of Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite, as did Joshua Paul Smith.

Books at a Glance interviewed Douglas Moo about his recent BECNT volume on Galatians.

At the Helwys Society Forum M. Grady Calhoun reviewed Resounding Truth by Jeremy Begbie.

Between the Times reflected on The Mystery of God, by Steven Boyer and Christopher Hall

Tim Henderson, at the Earliest Christianity blog, recommended James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul.

At First Things, Karen Swallow Prior wrote about marriage and drew from James K.A. Smith’s work in Desiring the Kingdom and Imagining the Kingdom.

As part of his ongoing “Aha Moments” series, Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, interviewed Jeannine Brown, author of Scripture as Communication and Becoming Whole and Holy.