BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 6, 2015

Cover ArtNorman Wirzba, author of From Nature to Creation, was interviewed at Jesus Creed.

“How we name things determines how we are going to relate to them. I don’t treat a “weed” the same way as I treat a “flower” even though both are plants. If the world is a “store” we will position ourselves as consumers. If the world is God’s “creation,” and we appreciate what that name means, then we will have to position ourselves in unique ways.”

Also, From Nature to Creation was reviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor in Spirit.

Mike Penza shared his favorite quotes from The Pastor as Public Theologian, by Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan.

Derek Rishmawy attended the recent Center for Pastor Theologians’ conference, and reflected on the messages of Baker Academic authors Peter Leithart, James K.A. Smith, and Kevin Vanhoozer.

Cover ArtKhaled Anatolios’ Retrieving Nicaea was reviewed at Marginalia.

“Along the way, as Anatolios directs, the reader proceeds beyond the coherence of Nicaea to its beauty and truth. In this refusal to separate doctrine and spirituality, action and reflection, Retrieving Nicaea provides a lasting contribution to both church and academy.”

Mike, at Brave Daily, reflected on the 10th anniversary of Inspiration and Incarnation by Peter Enns, and the new updated edition.

Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott, was reviewed at Sojourner Theology.

Cover ArtJames K.A. Smith was interviewed at The Living Church.

Could you briefly describe your own academic trilogy?
Desiring the Kingdom (2009) is an overview account of human beings as liturgical animals, so reading culture liturgically. Also, what would Christian education look like? Imagining the Kingdom (2013) covers how worship works. Awaiting the King (2017), its working title, will focus on political theology. If the body of Christ is the outpost of the city of God, how does that shape us for political engagement? How does it also relativize our tendency to partisan ideologies? I want to rewrite Augustine’s City of God for the 21st century. Augustine’s analysis of the Roman Empire is liturgical and so he’s looking at the rites of Rome.”

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 22, 2015

Cover ArtNijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, reviewed Jeffrey Weima’s BECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians.

This is the most thoroughly-researched, soundly-argued evangelical academic commentary to date, and it will serve students and pastors well for a very long time. Weima has spent a lifetime researching these letters and there is hardly a soul in the world…who knows these letters and the history of their study better.

Paul Heintzman’s Leisure and Spirituality was reviewed by Andrew Spencer at Ethics & Culture, Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint, Casey Hough at The Renewed Church, and Nate Claiborne.

Fred G. Zaspel, at Books at a Glance, reviewed Defending Substitution by Simon Gathercole.

Defending Substitution is a text that will sharpen understanding of this vital doctrine. It is easily accessible for Christian readers generally, but it is a book pastors and teachers especially will read to great profit. When we preach that “Christ died for us! Christ died for our sins!” we desperately want to be clear. And for that clarity Gathercole has rendered a wonderful service to the church.

Defending Substitution was also reviewed by James at Thoughts, Prayers & Songs, and Simon Gathercole was interviewed on The Christian Humanist Podcast.

At An Accidental Blog, Steve Bishop reviewed the recent Paideia volume on Galatians by Peter Oakes.

The Washington Book Review reviewed Matthew Schlimm’s This Strange and Sacred Scripture.

The Brookside Institute recommended Encountering the New Testament by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough, and The Drama of Scripture by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Justin Taylor shared Albert Mohler’s recommended books list for Preaching Magazine, with Daniel Block’s For the Glory of God and Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott’s Handbook of Religion taking the top spots.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 3, 2015

Cover ArtAt RBL, Bálint Károly Zabán reviewed John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew.

On the whole, the kernel of the book is very well and carefully written but equally impressively designed. With its focus on especially pragmatics, the textbook delves into a subject sometimes avoided by other grammars—a joy to read, a joy to use, and a joy to teach from!

Also at RBL, Darian Lockett reviewed the Paideia commentary on James and Jude, written by John Painter and David A. deSilva.

CHOICEconnect reviewed Early Christianity in Contexts edited by William Tabbernee (here), as well as Handbook of Religion edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott (here).

Andy Naselli recommended Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

Daniel Block’s For the Glory of God was reviewed at Spoiled Milk.

Engaging the Christian Scriptures, by Andrew E. Arterbury, W. H. Bellinger Jr., and Derek S. Dodson, was reviewed at the Young Restless Reformed Blog.

At Network, Greg Sinclair reflected on religious diversity in light of Our Global Families by Todd Johnson and Cindy Wu.

The Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series was recommended by The Frederick Faith Debate.

At Euangelion, Michael Bird shared a quote from Peter Oakes’ Galatians commentary.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, interviewed Mikeal Parsons about his recent Paideia commentary on Luke.

At Comment Magazine, James K. A. Smith shared two work-in-progress excerpts from his forthcoming third volume in the Cultural Liturgies series, Beyond “Creation” and Natural Law and Rethinking the Secular, Redeeming Christendom.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 6, 2015

Cover ArtAndrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship was reviewed by Jacob Prahlow at Pursuing Veritas.

McGowan superbly introduces the first centuries of Christian worship and does so in a relatively comprehensive and easy-to-engage manner. Ancient Christian Worship thus comes highly recommended to anyone studying early Christianity or Christian worship, and will be beneficial for anyone wanting an introduction to early Christian faith and practice more broadly. This truly is a masterful work and one that I look forward to engaging for many years to come.

Ancient Christian Worship was also reviewed by Early Christian Archives and CHOICE connect.

Michael Allen and Scott Swain discussed Reformed Catholicity at the Reformed Forum.

Nicholas Wolterstorff, author of Journey toward Justice, was interviewed by Ken Wytsma.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight reflected on Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation, and how tradition shapes our reading of Scripture.

D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul was reviewed by Michael Cooper at Servants of Grace, and recommended by Andy Naselli.

Preaching Magazine named For the Glory of God by Daniel Block, and Handbook of Religion edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland and Gerald McDermott, among “The Year’s Best Books for Preachers.”

Peter Enns announced the forthcoming 10th Anniversary Edition of Inspiration and Incarnation.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 13, 2015

Cover ArtThe Englewood Review of Books reviewed From Every Tribe and Nation by Mark Noll.

Noll’s memoir of discovery calls our attention to the infinitely larger story of global Christianity. May it inspire us to appreciate and share God’s heart for his people whom he is gathering to himself from every tribe and nation.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek, and reflected on evangelism and community in light of James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Mark Gignilliat at Reformation 21, and by Patrick Schreiner at Ad Fontes.

Library Journal reviewed Charles Farhadian’s forthcoming Introducing World Religions, and Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott.

Jeffrey Weima’s BECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians was reviewed at the Young Restless Reformed Blog.

At Blogging Theologically, Aaron Armstrong reflected on the first volume of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Shelby Etheridge reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for The Presbyterian Outlook.

At The Living Church, George Sumner reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Drew Trotter reviewed Robert Johnston’s God’s Wider Presence for the Consortium of Christian Study Centers.

A Farewell with Thanks from the Church and Postmodern Culture blog.

Daniel Block, author of For the Glory of God, recently gave a lecture on worship at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 12, 2014

Cover ArtMark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation was recommended by Robert Tracy McKenzie at Faith and History.

“It’s essentially the story of his personal spiritual and intellectual journey, with an emphasis on the way that Noll’s engagement with Christianity in other parts of the world has deepened his faith. But as every historian knows, you can visit foreign countries by traveling through time as well as space. Noll illustrates that truth wonderfully in the book’s second chapter, ‘Rescued by the Reformation.’”

At Crux Sola, Christopher Skinner recommended Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, edited by Christopher Hays and Christopher Ansberry.

Rodney Clapp, at Running Heads, reflected on holistic eschatology and J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott, was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N.T. Wright, and John Frederick, was reviewed at ἐνθύμησις.

Ed Smither reviewed Scott Sunquist’s Understanding Christian Mission.

Steven Bouma-Prediger, author of For the Beauty of the Earth, wrote the article “Trees, Healing, and Hope” for Sojourners.

David Gowler, who is writing a book on the reception history of the parables, celebrated the one year anniversary of his blog A Chorus of Voices.

At Reformedish, Derek Rishmawy recommended Adonis Vidu’s Atonement, Law, and Justice as one of his 5 Best Books of 2014.

At First Things, Wesley Hill recommended Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology.

J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth, and Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, were named as Jesus Creed Books of the Year by Scot McKnight.

Religion and Just War – an Excerpt from Handbook of Religion

The following is an excerpt from Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott.

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Cover ArtThe intention behind the creation of just-war theories, for the most part, is not to justify war, but to place limits upon what is seen as the regrettable inevitability of war. Martin Luther, for example, saw the Gospels as indicating that the Christian should be a pacifist; he nonetheless recognized that the state requires the use of violence for the good of all. He therefore advocated the “two-kingdom” theory, which urges personal nonviolence for the individual Christian, while permitting limited state violence.

….The most universally cited justification for going to war (called jus ad bellum, justice in going to war, in the Roman Catholic tradition) is the notion that a ruler has a duty to protect his or her citizens—that is, self-defense. This notion is found in all the major religious traditions. Other justifications for going to war affirmed in some religions are fighting in obedience to a commandment of God (Judaism) or fighting to secure justice or to protect the helpless (Islam).

In addition to justifying going to war, just-war theorizing also has attempted to specify what actions are and are not acceptable in the course of war (the Catholic jus in bello, just conduct within war). In Islam, for example, the Qur’an stipulates that a war must be conducted on a battlefield, that only soldiers may be attacked—not women, children, the elderly, or clergy. Terrorism (attacks on civilians) is absolutely forbidden. Wounded enemies and prisoners must be humanely treated. Homes and crops may not be destroyed. The use of poisons is forbidden.

Such norms notwithstanding, it is rare indeed to see a state pull back from war for religious reasons. Perhaps the most notable exception is found in the Indian king Asoka the Great. Initially, King Asoka (third century BCE), of the powerful Mauryan dynasty, greatly expanded the empire by use of military force. After conquering the kingdom of Kalinga, Asoka came to deeply regret the heavy toll of death and su!ering that resulted from the battle. He converted to Buddhism, publicly expressed his regret for the Kalinga war, and though at the peak of his military power, forswore any future expansionist wars.

©2014 by Terry C. Muck, Harold A. Netland, Gerald R. McDermott. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on Handbook of Religion, click here.

New Release: Handbook of Religion

Cover ArtThe comprehensive Handbook of Religion provides a Christian perspective on religion and its many manifestations around the world. Written by top religion scholars from a broad spectrum of Christianity, it introduces world religions, indigenous religious traditions, and new religious movements.

Articles explore the relationship of other religions to Christianity, providing historical perspective on past encounters and highlighting current issues. The book also contains articles by adherents of non-Christian religions, offering readers an insider’s perspective on various religions and their encounters with Christianity.

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“A remarkable handbook of religion that will bring our understanding of non-Christian religions and new religious movements to a new level. This handbook brings practitioners of other faiths alongside the best of evangelical scholarship to produce a magisterial volume that will serve the church well for decades….Historically informed, theologically vibrant, and engagingly practical. This is truly a landmark text.” – Timothy C. Tennent, Asbury Theological Seminary

“Not simply a catalog of the religions of the world, or even of religions as such, but a conceptual framing of religions that engages the evangelical perspective without excluding other views. A novel feature is the inclusion of essays by practitioners of other religions and of cultural and ideological movements.” – Lamin Sanneh, Yale Divinity School

“A handbook rich enough in perspective, content, and method to satisfy comparative historians of religion, contemporary theologians of world Christianity, and evangelists in Christian mission anywhere in the world–a formidable task, which they have accomplished with considerable insight….This would be an ideal textbook.” – Diane B. Obenchain, Fuller Theological Seminary

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Terry C. Muck (PhD, Northwestern University) is executive director of the Louisville Institute, a Lilly Endowment-funded program based at Louisville Seminary supporting those who lead and study American religious institutions. He formerly served as dean of the E. Stanley Jones School of World Mission and Evangelism at Asbury Theological Seminary. He is the author or coauthor of ten books, including Ministry and Theology in Global Perspective: Contemporary Challenges for the Church.

Harold A. Netland (PhD, Claremont Graduate University) is professor of philosophy of religion and intercultural studies at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. He is the author of several books and the coeditor of Globalizing Theology and Handbook of Religion.

Gerald R. McDermott (PhD, University of Iowa) is Jordan-Trexler Professor of Religion at Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia, and distinguished senior fellow at the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion. He is the author or editor of ten books, including God’s Rivals: Why Has God Allowed Different Religions?

For more information on Handbook of Religion, click here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 31, 2014

Cover ArtScot McKnight, at Jesus Creed, continues his reflections on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“It may well be that the youth do have the right to protest against their elders. If that be the case, however, the authenticity of such protest will be demonstrated by youth’s willingness to maintain solidarity with the guilt of the church-community and to bear that burden in love, abiding in penitence before God’s word.”

At The Gospel Coalition, Grant Gaines reviewed For the Glory of God by Daniel Block.

The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, was reviewed by Miguel Echevarria at Books at a Glance, and recommended by Ed Stetzer in a Christianity Today article about Biblical literacy.

Eric McKiddie, at Pastoralized, recommended A New Testament Biblical Theology by G.K. Beale.

At Words on the Word, Abram K-J recommended Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

John Morehead reflected on the Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland and Gerald McDermott.

Bryan Litfin, author of Early Christian Martyr Stories, and Mark Noll, author of From Every Tribe and Nation, were each interviewed on The Janet Mefferd Show. You can listen to Litfin’s interview here, and Noll’s here.