BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 9, 2015

Cover ArtDerek Rishmawy, at The Gospel Coalition, explains “Why You Should Read Bavinck.”

“Bavinck’s accomplishment in the Dogmatics is nothing short of jaw-dropping. The expansive, nuanced, and deeply trinitarian theological vision is both intellectually challenging and spiritually nourishing. I anticipate turning to these volumes regularly in the years to come.”

Reviews

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed at Euangelion.

Craig Blomberg reviewed A Peaceable Hope by David Neville, as well as The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, for the Denver Journal here and here.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Exploring Psychology and Christian Faith, by Paul Moes and Donald Tellinghuisen.

Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite was reviewed at CHOICE connect.

At Discovering the Mission of God, Ed reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed at Diglotting.

Michael Philliber, at Deus Misereatur, reviewed The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

Best Of

As 2014 came to a close, quite a number of Baker Academic titles were featured in “Best of” posts.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, John Frederick, Scott Hafemann and N.T. Wright, was named as one of “The Top (Mockingbird) Theology Books of 2014.”

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta listed Chris Keith’s Jesus Against the Scribal Elite, Galatians and Christian Theology, Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth among the “Best New Testament Academic Books of 2014.”

Women in the World of the Earliest Christians by Lynn Cohick, Wealth and Poverty in Early Church and Society edited by Susan Holman, Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey, The Economy of Desire by Daniel Bell, and Loving the Poor, Saving the Rich by Helen Rhee were all in Alvin Rapien’s “Top 10 Books of 2014.”

The Missio Alliance Essential Reading List of 2014” featured Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At Reformation 21, Michael Allen and Scott Swain’s Reformed Catholicity, Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution, Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan’s The Pastor as Public Theologian, and Richard Bauckham’s Gospel of Glory were noted as “New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.”

Elsewhere

Scot McKnight reflected on Alistair Stewart’s The Original Bishops in the post “Paul and the Economic Justice Vision of Jesus“, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth led to his discussion “Revolution in Eschatology Today?

Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, wrote “Incarnation and Epiphany: How Christmas became a Christian Feast” for ABC Religion and Ethics.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 10, 2014

Cover ArtEdith Humphrey, author of Scripture and Tradition and Grand Entrance, was interviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor In Spirit.

“Many people believe that tradition is stultifying and repressive, where it is the living experience of the Church. Also, many think that it a separate authority to judge Christian matters, whereas Scripture and Holy Tradition are always intertwined.”

Publishers Weekly reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight began a series on Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker by Andrew Root.

Also, Tony Jones reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Nathaniel Peters, at First Things, reflected on Andrew Root’s The Children of Divorce.

At The Christian Century, Bradley Hill recommended The Worship Architect by Constance Cherry.

Don Garlington reviewed Warren Carter’s Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, at RBL.

Also at RBL, David Lincicum’s Paul and the Early Jewish Encounter with Deuteronomy was reviewed by Archie Wright and Robert Foster.

Englewood Review of Books and Yale News recommend Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship.

For the Glory of God , by Daniel Block, was reviewed by Colton Guffey at the Southern Resources blog.

Ivan Mesa, at Lucid Theology, reviewed The Drama of Scripture by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

In this video series Francis Moloney, author of Love in the Gospel of John, gives a survey of John’s Gospel.

On the Mortification of Spin podcast, Carl Trueman, Todd Pruitt and Aimee Byrd recommended For the Glory of God by Daniel Block.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 27, 2013

Cover ArtThomas Guarino, author of Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, wrote the First Things article “Pope Francis Looks to St. Vincent of Lérins.”

“The pope rightly notes that St. Vincent compares the growth of doctrine to the gradual development whereby a child becomes an adult. Vincent’s (and Francis’) point, of course, is that over the years there occurs a refinement, maturation, and ripening of Christian doctrine.”

Derek Rishmawy shared A Prayer for Preachers and The 3:00 A.M. Test For Preaching from Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching.

In his post “’Sola Scriptura,’ ‘Prima Scriptura,’ or ‘Scriptura et Doctrina’?” Nijay Gupta referenced Scripture and Tradition, by Edith Humphrey.

Kent Sparks’s God’s Word in Human Words was used by Peter Enns in his post “Is God restricted by what the Bible says?”

Kevin DeYoung wishes he had time to read Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty.

John Fea has been doing a series of posts on Why Study History? sightings.

Daniel Kirk, author of Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?, was interviewed by Tripp Fuller on Homebrewed Christianity.

The Maxwell Institute Podcast interviewed Myron Penner about his recent book, The End of Apologetics.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 30, 2013

Cover ArtJordan Barrett, at For Christ and His Kingdom, reviewed Joel Green’s Practicing Theological Interpretation.

“Green’s book is a helpful guide for those wondering about all the hoopla surrounding theological interpretation. He is a careful reader of Scripture who also engages with and knows the great tradition well. As a good listener, Green is sympathetic to his critics but still maintains a strong and sometimes bold voice towards the renewal of relationship between biblical studies and theology. This is a great place to begin or even continue the conversation.”

Darian Burns reviewed Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey.

Chris Brewer reviewed Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics.

At Near Emmaus, Brian LePort reflected on S. Scott Bartchy’s article “Slaves and Slavery in the Roman World” from The World of the New Testament.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 09, 2013

Cover ArtJosh Hays at Towers Magazine interviewed Thomas Schreiner about The King in His Beauty.

“I took the title of the book from Isaiah 33:17, where he says, ‘You will see the king in his beauty.’ The story of the Bible is that God, as Lord and creator, is king, and he created us to rule the world for him. Human beings rejected God’s rule and sinned. God is king, but he doesn’t treat human beings as he did fallen angels. He promises in Genesis 3:15 that victory will be won (the world will be reclaimed) through the offspring of the woman who crushes the serpent. So that’s the narrative: how will God reclaim his rule over the world through human beings?”

Also, Jim West at Zwinglius Redivivus reviewed The King in His Beauty.

Jonathan Merritt interviewed Stanley Hauerwas, author of War and the American Difference, in a post titled Politics, patriotism, and pacifism.

Daniel Peterson featured Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics in his article Defending the Faith: Theological training not required to believe in Christ.

Michael Bird reviewed Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey.

Publishers Weekly noted a number of awards for Baker Academic and Brazos Press titles.

Nijay Gupta reviewed Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, and recommended some Fall ’13 Baker Academic releases.

Video: Edith Humphrey on Scripture and Tradition


Introducing Scripture and Tradition


What the Bible Really Says about Tradition


Living the Great Tradition

About the Book:

In some of the church’s history, Scripture has been pitted against tradition and vice versa. Prominent New Testament scholar Edith Humphrey, who understands the issue from both Protestant and Catholic/Orthodox perspectives, revisits this perennial point of tension. She demonstrates that the Bible itself reveals the importance of tradition, exploring how the Gospels, Acts, and the Epistles show Jesus and the apostles claiming the authority of tradition as God’s Word, both written and spoken. Arguing that Scripture and tradition are not in opposition but are necessarily and inextricably intertwined, Humphrey defends tradition as God’s gift to the church.

For more information on Scripture and Tradition, click here.

“On Scripture and Tradition” by Edith Humphrey

“On Scripture and Tradition
by Edith Humphrey

Recently I began teaching a continuing education class and was bowled over by the number of folks asking about tradition! I had anticipated a small cadre of Christians wondering about the topic of my new book, just to be released as the class began. Instead, I have a full house, ranging from a PhD, to those with specializations other than theology (a physician, a lawyer, etc.), to laypersons who are just interested. And the denominational spread is wide: Baptist, Pentecostal, Catholic, Presbyterian, Orthodox, Methodist, Anglican! Clearly others besides me are recognizing that this is a key question, foundational to our inner and cross-communion debates in the Church.

In Scripture and Tradition: What the Bible Really Says, I am not aiming to say everything that can be said about tradition. Rather, I train my gaze on what the biblical writers both model and state explicitly regarding our topic. The idea came when my husband challenged me to do a close analysis of those biblical passages that treat tradition. I had dismissed the idea, until it came back to haunt me one night when (inexplicably) I was having trouble sleeping. In the wee hours of the morning, I made a startling discovery: several key English translations avoid translating the Greek noun and verb (“tradition” and “to pass on as a tradition”) in their most natural English sense, and instead use substitutes or circumlocutions (“teaching,” “custom,” etc.). Well, this doesn’t happen all the time. The translations avoid the word “tradition” when the biblical author is referring to it as a good thing, but when man-made traditions are in view, the word is used unapologetically! It seemed clear to me that those English readers whose formation has come through these (Protestant) translations of the Bible will naturally assume that tradition is a sub-Christian or even anti-Christian concept, found in rigid Jewish or confused pagan contexts but not to be embraced in the Christian community.

But my discovery that night was not really the beginning of my thinking. My own formation, as a child and young adult in the Salvation Army, was fertile ground as well. To the Salvation Army I owe a great deal: a love for the Bible, sense of discipline, warm approach to faith and worship, and concentration on the Lord Jesus, the holiness of the Father, and the energy of the Holy Spirit in the Church. And it was just there that I had to start asking hard questions about tradition—in the Army we had many of them, from flags and uniforms to altar calls to the Mercy Seat (penitent form) and Holiness Table. There was also written tradition concerning how we were to regard Scripture: “We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament were given by inspiration of God, and that they only constitute the divine rule of Christian faith and practice.” As a child, I memorized twelve doctrines (each doctrine memorized being rewarded with a quarter!) along with the names of the books of the Bible. We were catechized, in “Junior Soldiers’” class as children and in “Corps Cadets” as youth, by learning from the official Handbook of Doctrine, not just the Bible.

What worried me, as I grew older, was that the Salvation Army persisted in its tradition of not practicing the sacraments, despite the clear words of Jesus and St. Paul. I heard entire sermons on the Great Commission at the end of Matthew’s Gospel that ignored the elephant in the room: here Jesus commands baptism. I was even more puzzled in Salvation Army meetings at the hearty singing of that gospel song, “I’ve been redeemed by the blood of the Lamb,” with its second verse: “And that’s not all, there’s more besides: I’ve been to the river and I’ve been baptized.” “No you haven’t!” I remember inwardly commenting. My young adulthood in the Salvation Army was a wonderful training ground not only for faithfulness, not only for creating a disciplined desire to serve others, but also for making me ask hard questions about the nature of the Church and the place of tradition in Protestant churches. Eventually I determined to look at the spectacles that were helping me to see, and I discovered that these were also in some ways blocking my vision.

So, then, it is not just that the vagaries of the English Bibles complicate our discussion about the relationship between Scripture and tradition. It is also that we come from distinct traditions, interpreting the Scriptures from particular contexts—even, ironically, the tradition of sola Scriptura! We read through hermeneutical spectacles of which we may or may not be aware. My aim in this book is to begin with what is, at least in part, our common denominator—a shared respect for the Scriptures—and to garner aspects of tradition that may surprise some and be a reminder to others. There are clues here regarding what should be taken as mutable “traditions” and what form part of an ongoing, holy Tradition for the entire household of God. We may be surprised to see that Tradition is disclosed as both oral and written, as capable of being personal rather than merely formal in character, and as typifying the vibrancy (not the ossification!) of the Church. We listen in on the apostle’s command that Thessalonians “heed everything that he has ‘traditioned’ to them, either by word or letter” (2 Thess. 2:15). We hear the elder’s desire to speak face-to-face with his readers rather than simply through the mediation of pen and ink (2 John 1:12). We remark that the words of Jesus at the Lord’s Supper, the witnesses to the resurrection, even the practical means of working hard while waiting for the Lord to return, all came to us through Tradition—as do the Scriptures themselves. More than that, we can contemplate that on the cross Jesus “traditioned” (gave over) his Spirit, as water and blood poured from his side.

The importance of holy person-to-person gifts (Greek: paradoseis, “traditions”) given over to us from Father to Son to apostles to Church becomes clear and may well fire our imaginations. What do we have that we did not receive (cf. 1 Cor. 4:7)? Where do we receive such riches? In the pages of the Scriptures, surely, but also in the modeled practices, in the hard decisions made by God’s people in council through the ages, in our worship life, in the Church’s formative call to a disciplined and other-directed life—in as many places as God’s people are enlivened by the Holy Spirit, the treasury of blessings and the giver of life. Could it be that the twenty-first century is the time when all who name Christ will look back to the Great Tradition (the Church’s life prior to schism), and recognize this has not misfired but is still alive and well?
———————–

Edith M. Humphrey (PhD, McGill University) is the William F. Orr Professor of New Testament at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She is the author of several books, including Grand Entrance: Worship on Earth as in Heaven and Ecstasy and Intimacy: When the Holy Spirit Meets the Human Spirit. She has also authored numerous articles on the literary and rhetorical study of the Bible.

New Release: Scripture and Tradition

In some of the church’s history, Scripture has been pitted against tradition and vice versa. Prominent New Testament scholar Edith Humphrey, who understands the issue from both Protestant and Catholic/Orthodox perspectives, revisits this perennial point of tension. She demonstrates that the Bible itself reveals the importance of tradition, exploring how the Gospels, Acts, and the Epistles show Jesus and the apostles claiming the authority of tradition as God’s Word, both written and spoken.

Arguing that Scripture and tradition are not in opposition but are necessarily and inextricably intertwined, Humphrey defends tradition as God’s gift to the church. She also works to dismantle rigid views of sola scriptura while holding a high view of Scripture’s authority.

“Edith Humphrey bridges the gap between the apostolic and postapostolic church by exploring the biblical foundations for Christian tradition. She invites readers to embrace the Bible’s own witness to tradition as an essential key to the entire life of the church. Elegantly written and exegetically compelling, this book reveals how ‘biblical’ tradition takes us beyond the impasse of the ‘Scripture versus tradition’ debates that have beleaguered Christianity since the Reformation.”
-Bradley Nassif, North Park University

“Edith Humphrey’s great gift for combining biblical scholarship with pastoral insight is charitably applied to one of the most significant stumbling blocks for Christian unity: the relation between Scripture and tradition. Her focus on Scripture’s own sense of tradition provides a way into the subject that will appeal especially to Protestants who share (and among whom she learned) her deep respect for Scripture. Yet these same readers may begin to discover that the tradition of which she speaks does not diminish but rather sustains, and is sustained by, that respect. What is therefore diminished is the stumbling block itself.”
-Douglas Farrow, McGill University

Edith M. Humphrey (PhD, McGill University) is the William F. Orr Professor of New Testament at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She is the author of several books, including Grand Entrance: Worship on Earth as in Heaven and Ecstasy and Intimacy: When the Holy Spirit Meets the Human Spirit. She has also authored numerous articles on the literary and rhetorical study of the Bible.

For more information about Scripture and Tradition, click here.