BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 13, 2015

Cover ArtThe Englewood Review of Books reviewed From Every Tribe and Nation by Mark Noll.

Noll’s memoir of discovery calls our attention to the infinitely larger story of global Christianity. May it inspire us to appreciate and share God’s heart for his people whom he is gathering to himself from every tribe and nation.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek, and reflected on evangelism and community in light of James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Mark Gignilliat at Reformation 21, and by Patrick Schreiner at Ad Fontes.

Library Journal reviewed Charles Farhadian’s forthcoming Introducing World Religions, and Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott.

Jeffrey Weima’s BECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians was reviewed at the Young Restless Reformed Blog.

At Blogging Theologically, Aaron Armstrong reflected on the first volume of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Shelby Etheridge reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for The Presbyterian Outlook.

At The Living Church, George Sumner reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Drew Trotter reviewed Robert Johnston’s God’s Wider Presence for the Consortium of Christian Study Centers.

A Farewell with Thanks from the Church and Postmodern Culture blog.

Daniel Block, author of For the Glory of God, recently gave a lecture on worship at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 9, 2015

Cover ArtDerek Rishmawy, at The Gospel Coalition, explains “Why You Should Read Bavinck.”

“Bavinck’s accomplishment in the Dogmatics is nothing short of jaw-dropping. The expansive, nuanced, and deeply trinitarian theological vision is both intellectually challenging and spiritually nourishing. I anticipate turning to these volumes regularly in the years to come.”

Reviews

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed at Euangelion.

Craig Blomberg reviewed A Peaceable Hope by David Neville, as well as The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, for the Denver Journal here and here.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Exploring Psychology and Christian Faith, by Paul Moes and Donald Tellinghuisen.

Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite was reviewed at CHOICE connect.

At Discovering the Mission of God, Ed reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed at Diglotting.

Michael Philliber, at Deus Misereatur, reviewed The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

Best Of

As 2014 came to a close, quite a number of Baker Academic titles were featured in “Best of” posts.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, John Frederick, Scott Hafemann and N.T. Wright, was named as one of “The Top (Mockingbird) Theology Books of 2014.”

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta listed Chris Keith’s Jesus Against the Scribal Elite, Galatians and Christian Theology, Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth among the “Best New Testament Academic Books of 2014.”

Women in the World of the Earliest Christians by Lynn Cohick, Wealth and Poverty in Early Church and Society edited by Susan Holman, Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey, The Economy of Desire by Daniel Bell, and Loving the Poor, Saving the Rich by Helen Rhee were all in Alvin Rapien’s “Top 10 Books of 2014.”

The Missio Alliance Essential Reading List of 2014” featured Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At Reformation 21, Michael Allen and Scott Swain’s Reformed Catholicity, Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution, Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan’s The Pastor as Public Theologian, and Richard Bauckham’s Gospel of Glory were noted as “New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.”

Elsewhere

Scot McKnight reflected on Alistair Stewart’s The Original Bishops in the post “Paul and the Economic Justice Vision of Jesus“, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth led to his discussion “Revolution in Eschatology Today?

Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, wrote “Incarnation and Epiphany: How Christmas became a Christian Feast” for ABC Religion and Ethics.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 6, 2014

Cover ArtBooks At a Glance interviewed Stanley Porter about his latest book, How we got the New Testament.

“I examine the textual basis of our Greek New Testament, reconstruct the history of its transmission from earliest times, and then trace the history of its translation. The overall result is an overwhelming affirmation of the reliability of the Greek New Testament….I hope that this has direct value for anyone interested in the New Testament, both pastors and lay people, and especially for those interested in some of the more technical aspects of its text.”

James Bradford Pate reviewed Union with Christ, by J. Todd Billings.

Lindsay Kennedy, at My Digital Seminary, reviewed Thomas Schreiner’s Romans BECNT volume.

Spoiledmilks reviewed the Mark BECNT volume, by Robert Stein.

At The Pneuma Review, Andrew K. Gabriel reviewed Mapping Modern Theology, edited by Kelly Kapic and Bruce McCormack.

David Barshinger, at Exploring Church History, reviewed John Fea’s Why Study History?

Thomas Booher, at The Tulip Driven Life, reflected on Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics.

The Courage to Die, a post from Rodney Decker, author of the forthcoming Reading Koine Greek, who passed away on Sunday, May 25, 2014.

 

Baker Academic Library: The Doctrine of the Trinity

Herman Bavinck, Reformed Dogmatics, abridged, p. 230:

For the Christian church. the doctrine of the Trinity was the dogma and hence the mystery par excellence. The essence of Christianity–the absolute self-revleation of God in the person of Christ and the absolute self-communication of God in the Holy Spirit–could only be maintained, the church believed, if it was grounded int he ontological Trinity. To defend Scripture’s teaching, the church found it necessary to use language that went beyond Scripture, a practice condemned by Arians and their post-Reformation and modern counterparts but always defended by Christian theology. Christian theological reflection on Scripture has every right to move freely beyond the exact language of Scripture to draw warranted inferences from it. These two are authoritative. In fact, theological reflection on Scripture is not even possible without the freedom to use extrabiblical terminology. Their use is not designed to introduce new–extrabiblical or antibiblical–dogmas but, on the contrary, to defend the truth of Scripture against all heresy. They exercise a primarily negative function, marking the boundary lines within which Christian thought must proceed in order to preserve the truth of revelation.

Steven Boyer and Christopher Hall, The Mystery of God, p. 121:

God is not just tri-personal; he is expansively, creatively tri-personal. The triunity of God is something taht unfolds and opens out, not something that curves in and closes down on itself. God’s intrinsic relational completeness, the unimaginable eternal intimacy between the Father and the Son in the Spirit, does not exclude other relations; it is instead the ground of other relations. The unquenchable divine joy that makes creation unnecessary also makes creation possible in the first place, for the love of Father, Son, and Spirit is in no way threatened or imperiled by flowing out beyond itself into a created world. […] God is love, and creation itself is a wholly free outpouring of that love, in generous, gratuitous, open-handed bounty, a bounty that is infinitely hospitable not because it needs us but simply because it is itself.

Millard Erickson, Christian Theology, 2nd ed., pp. 366-67:

Although we cannot fully see how these two contrasting conceptions [oneness of God; threeness of God] relate to each other, theologians are not the only ones who must retain two polarities as they function. In order to account for the phenomena of light, physicists have to hold both that it is waves and taht it is quanta, little bundles of energy as it were, yet logically it cannot be both. As one physicist put it: “On Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, we think of light as waves; on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, we think of it as particles of energy.” Presumably, on Sundays physicists do not concern themselves with the nature of light. One cannot explain a mystery, but can only acknowledge its presence.

Khaled Anatolios, Retrieving Nicaea, pp. 6-7:

The use of analogies has been pervasive in the history of Christian reflection on the divine Trinity. But, going beyond skirmishes over which analogy is most adequate, one has to question the whole approach in which analogies become the primary location of trinitarian meaning. When the meaning of trinitarian doctrine is located principally in some particular creaturely analogue, it becomes separable from other aspects of the Christian mystery. Instead of trinitarian meaning being embedded in the whole nexus of Christian faith, it tends to be reduced to the features of the analogue itself. One can after all espouse “relationality” or wonder at the mind’s differentiated unity in the acts of knowing and willing without actually confessing and worshiping the Triune god as Father, Son, and Spirit. In that case, one could capture the meaning of trinitarian doctrine without ever subscribing to Christian faith. At the very least, the doctrine of the Trinity is then in danger of becoming simply another item in the list of Christian beliefs. Thus a Christian would be someone who believes that God created the world from nothing, that Jesus arose from the dead, and that God is in some way like a shamrock leaf (or human consciousness, or human relationships). Surely Rahner is right: the meaning of trinitarian doctrine must have a more intrinsic connection to the structure and texture of the whole of Christian life and faith.