BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 31, 2014

Cover ArtAt Reading Acts, Phil Long reviewed Michael Bird’s Are You the One Who Is To Come? and Bruce Fisk’s A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Jesus.

“Fisk succeeds in presenting some of the more difficult problems for modern people studying the Historical Jesus in an entertaining and compelling fashion. The book would make an excellent textbook for a Gospels class at the undergraduate level and a good introduction for a layperson wanting to get an understanding of some of the more difficult issues discussed by Historical Jesus scholars.”

Joel Willitts reflected on The Suffering and Victorious Christ, by Richard Mouw and Doug Sweeney.

Craig Blomberg reviewed Raymond Collins’ Second Corinthians Paideia commentary, for the Denver Seminary Journal.

The 5th Edition of Tremper Longman’s Old Testament Commentary Survey was reviewed by Rick Wadholm.

At ThinkApologetics, Eric Chabot reviewed Introducing Apologetics, by James Taylor.

At Blogizomai, Kyle McDanell  reviewed Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, by Warren Carter.

David Naugle, at One Theology, reviewed Jonathan R. Wilson’s God’s Good World.

Anthony Le Donne recommended Jesus Among Friends and Enemies, edited by Larry Hurtado and Chris Keith.

At Transpositions, Jim Watkins discussed Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life, and its application to copyright law.

Giveaway: PAIDEIA Commentary Set

Baker Academic has just released the latest volume in the PAIDEIA Commentary on the New Testament series – Second Corinthians by Raymond Collins.

To celebrate, we are giving away a complete set of all eleven volumes published so far in the series. To enter, fill out the form below (don’t miss extra chances to win via Facebook and Twitter!).

About the Book:

In this addition to the well-received Paideia series, respected senior New Testament scholar Raymond Collins examines cultural context and theological meaning in Second Corinthians.

“Collins’s impressive scholarly achievements and vast teaching experience are evident in his commentary on 2 Corinthians. He deftly leads his readers through Paul’s most challenging text. In addition to highlighting Paul’s rhetorical strategies, Collins offers a lucid exposition of the apostle’s defense of his ministry and his determination to help the Corinthians to embrace God’s mysterious way of exhibiting power through weakness. I will strongly recommend that my students read this commentary, which continues the level of excellence set by its predecessors in the Paideia series.”
Thomas D. Stegman, SJ

(if you don’t see the giveaway form below, click here)