BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 6, 2015

Cover ArtNorman Wirzba, author of From Nature to Creation, was interviewed at Jesus Creed.

“How we name things determines how we are going to relate to them. I don’t treat a “weed” the same way as I treat a “flower” even though both are plants. If the world is a “store” we will position ourselves as consumers. If the world is God’s “creation,” and we appreciate what that name means, then we will have to position ourselves in unique ways.”

Also, From Nature to Creation was reviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor in Spirit.

Mike Penza shared his favorite quotes from The Pastor as Public Theologian, by Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan.

Derek Rishmawy attended the recent Center for Pastor Theologians’ conference, and reflected on the messages of Baker Academic authors Peter Leithart, James K.A. Smith, and Kevin Vanhoozer.

Cover ArtKhaled Anatolios’ Retrieving Nicaea was reviewed at Marginalia.

“Along the way, as Anatolios directs, the reader proceeds beyond the coherence of Nicaea to its beauty and truth. In this refusal to separate doctrine and spirituality, action and reflection, Retrieving Nicaea provides a lasting contribution to both church and academy.”

Mike, at Brave Daily, reflected on the 10th anniversary of Inspiration and Incarnation by Peter Enns, and the new updated edition.

Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott, was reviewed at Sojourner Theology.

Cover ArtJames K.A. Smith was interviewed at The Living Church.

Could you briefly describe your own academic trilogy?
Desiring the Kingdom (2009) is an overview account of human beings as liturgical animals, so reading culture liturgically. Also, what would Christian education look like? Imagining the Kingdom (2013) covers how worship works. Awaiting the King (2017), its working title, will focus on political theology. If the body of Christ is the outpost of the city of God, how does that shape us for political engagement? How does it also relativize our tendency to partisan ideologies? I want to rewrite Augustine’s City of God for the 21st century. Augustine’s analysis of the Roman Empire is liturgical and so he’s looking at the rites of Rome.”

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 9, 2015

Cover ArtAt Reformedish, Derek Rishmawy discussed the virtue of charitable reading in light of George Hunsinger’s Reading Barth with Charity.

“Principles of moral interpretation such as that of charity have become all the more pressing to adopt and practice as our internet age has pressed even more of our communication to be textually-mediated. We are constantly reading, interpreting, and engaging with the texts of other authors, other citizens of language like ourselves. If we fail to practice charity in interpretation, one of our most socially and morally formative practices, it can’t help but bleed out into other areas of our thought and life.”

The Pastor as Public Theologian, by Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan, was reviewed at AJ Cerda.

Ian Panth, at Pop Christ, continued his review of Inspiration and Incarnation by Peter Enns.

James K.A. Smith – author of numerous books, including Imagining the Kingdom, Who’s Afraid of Relativism? , and the forthcoming You are What You Love from Brazos Press – will be speaking at the Desiring the Kingdom conference and the Center for Pastor Theologians.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 2, 2015

Cover ArtSpiritual Companioning, by Angela Reed, Richard Osmer, and Marcus Smucker, was reviewed at The Christian Century.

The authors, practical theologians all, write passionately about the communal, relational nature of the church and the communal nature of the Trinity. They successfully skirt the individualistic ap­proach that is sometimes found in books on Christian spirituality, and they make a compelling, winsome case for why spiritual companioning is a gift for the church.

Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians was reviewed at Spoiled Milks.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Why Christian Faith Still Makes Sense by C. Stephen Evans.

At Unsystematic Theology, Kyle Roberts reflected on Inspiration and Incarnation by Peter Enns.

Scot McKnight discussed Andrew McGowan’s treatment of music in Ancient Christian Worship.

George Guthrie, author of the BECNT volume on 2 Corinthians, was interviewed by Oak Hill College.

 

Boundary Markers – an Excerpt from Inspiration and Incarnation, 2nd Edition

The following is an excerpt from the 2nd edition of Inspiration and Incarnation, by Peter Enns.

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I wrote Inspiration and Incarnation to articulate for evangelicals a different way to think about Scripture, using the incarnation of Christ as an analogy for shaping the expectations we place on Scripture as God’s word.

The presenting problem was my experience that the evangelical community has not always sat comfortably with the pressing, long-standing, and most importantly unavoidable theological challenges that stem from the historical study of Scripture, which I outline in chapters 2–4. It seemed to me, and still does, that at least part of this dis-ease reflects the felt need to preserve important “boundary markers” of the evangelical faith community concerning Scripture.

Cover ArtOf course all communities of faith have boundaries, but in the case of evangelicalism those boundaries have either engaged critical biblical scholarship selectively or held it at arm’s length as essentially a threat rather than working toward a true and, in my view, much needed theological synthesis.

Protecting boundaries has come at a price for many evangelicals: the unfortunate and recurring pattern where the same theological “conflicts” keep coming up in successive generations. This well documented phenomenon does not stem, as is often claimed, from newer generations “caving in” to liberal thinking, of failing to hold fast to the hard fought lessons of faithful warriors of the past. Rather the generational, cyclical disquiet among evangelicals indicates that the hard fought lessons have failed to provide adequate and persuasive explanatory power for many within evangelicalism.

Once exposed sympathetically to the wider landscape of modern biblical scholarship (whether formally trained or not), evangelicals often come to question older intellectual paradigms while still valuing deeply the personal faith cultivated in that earlier context. They want to work things out, to find a viable way forward, and so they seek a synthesis of old and new. A failure to support those efforts by their ecclesiastical or professional communities leads to tensions that are too often resolved to neither party’s ultimate advantage—a scenario that has been played out with increasing regularity in recent years within evangelical and fundamentalist schools.

Without wishing to overstate, I think Inspiration and Incarnation has played at least some role over the last ten years in bringing this dysfunctional and wholly unnecessary pattern to greater public consciousness, and one hope I have for the continued reception of the book is to help minimize this unfortunate cycle of suspicion and combat.

An incarnational model, I continue to think, is not controversial and could in fact be quite effective in generating conversations for moving forward. After all, appealing to the core Christian mystery of the incarnation of Christ as a means of understanding the nature of Scripture is, despite protests, not an innovative theological move on my part, and at the same time it provides some flexibility for reimagining evangelical bibliology.

©2015 by Peter Enns. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on Inspiration and Incarnation, click here.

New Release: Inspiration and Incarnation, 2nd Edition

Cover ArtHow can an evangelical view of Scripture be reconciled with modern biblical scholarship? In this book Peter Enns, an expert in biblical interpretation, addresses Old Testament phenomena that challenge traditional evangelical perspectives on Scripture. He then suggests a way forward, proposing an incarnational model of biblical inspiration that takes seriously both the divine and the human aspects of Scripture.

This tenth anniversary edition of the groundbreaking Inspiration and Incarnation features an updated bibliography and includes a substantive postscript that reflects on the reception of the first edition.

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“Peter Enns has done the evangelical church an immense service by challenging preconceived notions of what the Bible ought to be….Everyone who loves the Bible ought to read this important book.” – Tremper Longman III, Westmont College

“A superb resource for helping students of the Bible take the human dimension of this ancient text seriously.” – Richard Middleton, Northeastern Seminary

“Urgently needed by Christians still caught in late modern debates about inerrancy, inspiration, and revelation. This book continues to strike a chord that resonates.” – Stephen B. Chapman, Duke University

Inspiration and Incarnation was a watershed in evangelical hermeneutics….This second edition is warmly welcomed.” – Chris Keith, St. Mary’s University

“If everyone who identifies as a conservative evangelical would read and absorb this book, the field would be better for it–and so might the church and the world.” – Christopher B. Hays, Fuller Theological Seminary

“Peter Enns is to be applauded for the second edition of this important and insightful book….Highly recommended for biblical scholars and general readers alike!” – Eric Seibert, Messiah College

Inspiration and Incarnation offers us the good news that God is not limited by our expectations but can and does speak through the Bible we actually have.” – J. R. Daniel Kirk, Fuller Theological Seminary

“Peter Enns is one of the most important scholarly voices speaking to Christianity today, and this book is a primary example of why!” – Christopher W. Skinner, Mount Olive College and East Carolina University

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Peter EnnsPeter Enns (PhD, Harvard University) is the Abram S. Clemens Professor of Biblical Studies at Eastern University in St. Davids, Pennsylvania. He was formerly senior fellow of biblical studies for The BioLogos Foundation, an organization that explores the integration of science and Christian faith, where he wrote a regular column for their Science and the Sacred blog. He has taught at several schools, including Princeton Theological Seminary, Fuller Theological Seminary, Temple University, and Westminster Theological Seminary. Enns has authored or edited numerous books, including The Bible Tells Me So and The Evolution of Adam.

For more information on Inspiration and Incarnation, click here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 6, 2015

Cover ArtAndrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship was reviewed by Jacob Prahlow at Pursuing Veritas.

McGowan superbly introduces the first centuries of Christian worship and does so in a relatively comprehensive and easy-to-engage manner. Ancient Christian Worship thus comes highly recommended to anyone studying early Christianity or Christian worship, and will be beneficial for anyone wanting an introduction to early Christian faith and practice more broadly. This truly is a masterful work and one that I look forward to engaging for many years to come.

Ancient Christian Worship was also reviewed by Early Christian Archives and CHOICE connect.

Michael Allen and Scott Swain discussed Reformed Catholicity at the Reformed Forum.

Nicholas Wolterstorff, author of Journey toward Justice, was interviewed by Ken Wytsma.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight reflected on Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation, and how tradition shapes our reading of Scripture.

D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul was reviewed by Michael Cooper at Servants of Grace, and recommended by Andy Naselli.

Preaching Magazine named For the Glory of God by Daniel Block, and Handbook of Religion edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland and Gerald McDermott, among “The Year’s Best Books for Preachers.”

Peter Enns announced the forthcoming 10th Anniversary Edition of Inspiration and Incarnation.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 24, 2014

Cover ArtAndrew Root, author of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, was interviewed by Arni Zachariassen at theologues.

“Dietrich asserts that there is no such thing as “Christian youth.” Ultimately, what he wants to steer away from is an idol he thinks the church bows to often, which is to glorify youthfulness. Dietrich sees a church (and I see a church today) that badly wants a youthful spirit but not the concrete humanity of young people themselves. We want the young around the church because it makes the church seem like a vital/culturally legitimate institution. But we are less willing to make space for the young at the center of our lives together.”

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight continued his series on Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker in the posts Who Owns Bonhoeffer? and Rethinking “Youth” Ministry.

Also, Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed by Calvin Park at Random Bloggings and Diane Reynolds at Bonhoeffer: Women, Life, Times, and featured in the New Book Releases at The Englewood Review of Books.

Justin Taylor, at The Gospel Coalition, interviewed Bryan Litfin about his new book Early Christian Martyr Stories.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, shared a quote on historical criticism from God’s Word in Human Words by Kenton Sparks.

The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, was reviewed by Steve Bishop at An Accidental Blog and by Jacob Prahlow at Pursuing Veritas.

Daniel Block’s For the Glory of God was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Basil of Caesarea, by Stephen Hildebrand, was reviewed by Kyle Hughes at Early Christian Archives.

Kengo Akiyama, at Biblical and Early Christian Studies, reviewed Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 17, 2014

Cover ArtLawrence Osborn, at Theosblog, reviewed Basil of Caesarea by Stephen Hildebrand.

“Basil of Caesarea was one of the key theologians of the early Church. As such, he is well known to contemporary students of theology, but often only in a fragmentary way and often only as a theologian. In this detailed and lucid introduction to Basil’s life and thought, Stephen Hildebrand has integrated those fragments to give us a rounded picture of the man and his thought.”

Stanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament was reviewed by George P. Wood.

Chris Ho, at the Young Restless and Reformed Blog, reviewed For the Glory of God by Daniel Block.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, shared a quote from God’s Word in Human Words by Kenton Sparks.

Robert Sylvester, at the Spirlaw blog, reflected on Roger Lundin’s Beginning with the Word.

Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, by David Setran and Chris Kiesling, was discussed at The Humanitas Forum.

Brian Sandifer reflected on Dale Kuehne’s Sex in the iWorld.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, is looking forward to the release of Peter Oakes’ Paideia commentary on Galatians.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 29, 2014

Cover ArtThe Christian Century recently featured Meeting God at the Movies, an excerpt from Robert Johnston’s forthcoming God’s Wider Presence.

“Few in the church have been encouraged to think theologically about encounters with God that take place outside the church and its scripture. The result is a disconnect between how the church speaks formally of God’s self-revelation and how those who are not Christians speak of that same reality.”

Nijay Gupta shared a brief review of Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite, as did Joshua Paul Smith.

Books at a Glance interviewed Douglas Moo about his recent BECNT volume on Galatians.

At the Helwys Society Forum M. Grady Calhoun reviewed Resounding Truth by Jeremy Begbie.

Between the Times reflected on The Mystery of God, by Steven Boyer and Christopher Hall

Tim Henderson, at the Earliest Christianity blog, recommended James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul.

At First Things, Karen Swallow Prior wrote about marriage and drew from James K.A. Smith’s work in Desiring the Kingdom and Imagining the Kingdom.

As part of his ongoing “Aha Moments” series, Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, interviewed Jeannine Brown, author of Scripture as Communication and Becoming Whole and Holy.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 18, 2014

Cover ArtThe Institute for Sacred Architecture reviewed The Space Between, by Eric Jacobsen.

“Jacobsen artfully weaves together the linear progression of the story of redemption, which starts in the Garden and ends in the Heavenly City, with our understanding of the urban environment. He states that in our place and time we are not yet in the Heavenly City; however, we can and should work toward it.”

G.K Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew, and Rolf Jacobson and Karl Jacobson’s Invitation to the Psalms were reviewed in the Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament.

Daniel Waldschmidt, at the Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary Blog, reviewed Galatians by Douglas Moo.

At Scriptorium Daily, Matt Jenson recommended the Turning South series; comprised of Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice, Susan VanZanten’s Reading a Different Story, and Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Jordon Stone recommended Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, at the Ordinary Ministry blog.

At Daily Theology, Krista Stevens reflected on The Gospel of Mark by Francis Moloney.

David Naugle listed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel, in the Cardus summer reading list.

The Logos Academic Blog interviewed Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, interviewed Christopher Hays, co-editor of Evangelicals and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, as part of his ongoing “Aha” Moments series.