BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 26, 2015

Cover ArtGeorge Guthrie, author of 2 Corinthians in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, was interviewed at Books at a Glance. (Part 1, and part 2).

“New commentaries on 2 Corinthians do not hit the press every day, and it is noteworthy when one of 736 pages arrives from a respected New Testament scholar such as George Guthrie of Union University. We were eager to see Dr. Guthrie’s treatment of this rather neglected book, the latest addition to Baker’s outstanding Exegetical Commentary series, and today he talks to us about his new work.”

At RBL, Iain Provan reviewed Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Also at RBL, Warren Carter’s Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World was reviewed by Richard Johnson.

“Carter identifies his objective as orienting the reader to “some important aspects” of the world of Jesus and his early disciples, thereby helping Carter’s readers to read the New Testament with greater understanding (xvii). That dual objective is worth accomplishing, and Carter has succeeded in that effort. He has provided a popular resource that incorporates serious historical reflection with explicit and judicious treatment of primary sources.”

Christianity and Religious Diversity, by Harold Netland, was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Books Saint.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 17, 2015

Cover ArtAt RBL, Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed by Trent Butler (here) and Wilhelm Wessels (here).

This is a book that exudes so much knowledge about matters pertaining to the Hebrew Bible and wisdom about life that it should be read by academics, theologians, seminary teachers, and also ministers in the Christian tradition.

There were a number of reviews and reflections on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker this week, including: The Heavy Laden Bookshelf, Relevant Magazine, Lutheran Confessions, Youth Front, and an interview at Premier Youthwork.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Peter Oakes’ new Paideia commentary on Galatians.

Let me say, as someone who has read every single word of this fine volume, that it is a “must-have.”

James, at Thoughts, Prayers & Songs, reviewed God’s Wider Presence by Robert Johnston.

Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship was reviewed by Lee Jefferson at Marginalia and by Larry Hurtado.

Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher- Walls was reviewed at Conversation in Faith.

Books at a Glance shared an excerpt from D.A. Carson’s Praying with Paul.

James K. A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? and J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth made the sort list for this year’s Word Awards.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 30, 2015

Cover ArtMathew Sims, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed James K. A. Smith’s Imagining the Kingdom.

I cannot recommend Imagining the Kingdom highly enough. It’s a much needed corrective for the Church especially in our current climate where secular liturgies often are more formative. Christians have failed to tell and live our story in a way that’s believable and affective.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight reflected on Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation by Matthew Levering.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

At Books at a Glance, Adam Darbonne reviewed Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Jackson Watts, at the Helwys Society Forum, reviewed Beth Felker Jones’ Practicing Christian Doctrine.

Adonis Vidu’s Atonement, Law, and Justice was review at Pastor Dave Online.

Gary Ridley, at Send U, reviewed Effective Intercultural Communication by A. Scott Moreau, Evvy Hay Campbell and Susan Greener.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, is looking forward to Mikeal Parsons’ Paideia commentary on Luke.

Justin Taylor shared Thomas Schreiner’s reflections in The King in His Beauty on seeing the Trinity in Genesis 1:26.

At Lingering in Love, Ian McConnell has been working through Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, and Bonhoeffer’s eight theses on youth work. Read posts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

The Gospel Coalition shared 8 Lessons from the School of Prayer, an excerpt from D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 22, 2014

Cover ArtWesley Ellis, at Living in the Kingdom, reviewed Andrew Root’s forthcoming Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“Root looks to present Bonhoeffer’s youth ministry as a consistent lens for understanding his development of thought. Bonhoeffer’s theology didn’t develop out of the ether, but emerged from his relationships and from his engagement in the concrete lived experience of the young people to whom he ministered throughout his life.”

The Bible Gateway Blog interviewed Patricia Dutcher-Walls, author of Reading the Historical Books.

A number of Baker Academic titles were reviewed in the latest volume of Themelios, including:

Jennifer Guo reviewed Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life.

At The Poor in Spirit Alvin Rapien interviewed Daniel Bell, author of The Economy of Desire.

Kevin Davis, at After Existentialism, Light, reflected on Christopher Seitz’s The Character of Christian Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 15, 2014

Cover ArtBruce Ellis Benson, author of Liturgy as a Way of Life, was interviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor in Spirit.

“What is liturgy? Probably the simplest way of answering that is that it all about how we live our lives. We have routines; we have ways of doing things; we have things that are essential to our lives. How we order our lives has to do with what we value. So, far from being just some kind of thing that “liturgical churches” do, liturgy is something that we cannot help but do on a daily basis.”

The Verbum Blog interviewed Mary Healy and Peter Williamson, editors of the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture series and authors of the volumes on The Gospel of Mark and Ephesians. Read part one and part two of their discussion.

Hoon Lee, at Exploring Church History, reviewed Timothy Wengert’s Reading the Bible with Martin Luther.

At Panorama of a Book Saint, Conrade Yap reviewed Encountering the Book of Romans by Douglas Moo.

Conversations in Faith reviewed Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher- Walls.

The Books & Culture Podcast discussed J. Richard Middleton’s forthcoming A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty was reviewed by David Maas for RBL.

Joshua Torrey, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed Clayton Jefford’s Reading the Apostolic Fathers.

Marc Cortez listed Practicing Christian Doctrine by Beth Felker Jones in his post The Best Theology Books from the First Half of 2014.

At Brief Inquisition? Michael Hansen reflected on James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

James Skillen, author of The Good of Politics was interviewed about the conflicts in Iraq, Gaza, and Ukraine by the Christian Courier.

 

Video: Patricia Dutcher-Walls on Reading Biblical History in the Classroom and the Church

The Challenge of Reading Biblical History

Using Reading the Historical Books in the Classroom

Using Reading the Historical Books in the Church

Cover ArtAbout the Book: Biblical history can be some of the most difficult material for beginning students to grasp. The conventions of contemporary history writing are quite different from those of ancient Israelite writers. In Reading the Historical Books a master teacher offers basic orientation to the genre and conventions of the Old Testament historical books, helping students become careful and attentive readers.

“This student’s guide is a model of clarity, economy, and explanatory skill. Writing in a straightforward and interesting style and spicing up her discussion with specific ancient and modern examples, Patricia Dutcher-Walls lays out a sensible reading plan for any who wish to take the Bible seriously.” – V. Philips Long, Regent College

“Finally, an accessible work that reunites the literary and historical aspects of the Old Testament historical books and trains contemporary readers to hear the text in responsible ways that can shape the course of life today.” – Mark J. Boda, McMaster University

For more information on Reading the Historical Books, click here.

Video: Patricia Dutcher-Walls on History in the Ancient World

Writing History in the Ancient World

Introducing Reading the Historical Books

Explaining Ancient History in a Digital Age

Cover ArtAbout the Book: Biblical history can be some of the most difficult material for beginning students to grasp. The conventions of contemporary history writing are quite different from those of ancient Israelite writers. In Reading the Historical Books a master teacher offers basic orientation to the genre and conventions of the Old Testament historical books, helping students become careful and attentive readers.

“For those coming to serious study of the Bible for the first time, there cannot be any more important lesson than to understand how to read the Bible’s ancient historical records faithfully on their own terms. They are not always the same as ours. You will not find a better or more sympathetic introductory book than this one to point you in the right direction.” – H. G. M. Williamson, University of Oxford

“This engaging guide to reading historical narrative in the Old Testament is a great text for beginners. Dutcher-Walls assumes little and draws on a wide variety of relevant texts and illustrations from the Bible, ancient Near Eastern sources, and especially modern historical texts and media contexts. There is nothing better for communicating basic principles of Hebrew Bible historiography to modern readers.” – Richard S. Hess, Denver Seminary

For more information on Reading the Historical Books, click here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 27, 2014

Cover ArtDenis Fortin reviewed Robin Jensen’s Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity for RBL.

“Jensen does a magnificent job of presenting these five core motifs of baptism in early Christian documents and art. Her excellent knowledge of ancient literature is evident and her analysis of art forms very enlightening….Any student of early church history and theology will appreciate its value.”

Also at RBL, Abson Joseph reviewed the third edition of Encountering the New Testament, by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Reading the Historical Books, by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Andrew Marr reviewed David Neville’s A Peaceable Hope.

At Analogical Thoughts, James Anderson reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

James K.A. Smith, author of Who’s Afraid of Relativism? and Imagining the Kingdom, wrote Steadfast Principles in a Changing World as part of a New York Times series on Christianity and Capitalism.

Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, were recommended in the Pastors Today article How to Find a Good Commentary.

An excerpt from Mark Cannister’s Teenagers Matter was shared in Outreach Magazine.

Haddon Robinson, author of Biblical Preaching, was interviewed by Ministry Magazine.

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was recommended in Catalyst’s Summer Reading list.

 

Writing in the Ancient Near East – an Excerpt from Reading the Historical Books

Cover ArtThe following is an excerpt from Reading the Historical Books, by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

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Writing was an activity developed in the ancient Near East around 3000 BCE, starting with cuneiform and hieroglyphic writing in Mesopotamia and Egypt. Hieroglyphic writing systems used pictograms to represent ideas and consonantal parts of words, and cuneiform used wedge-shaped impressions to create signs denoting syllables or consonantal parts of words.

Writing using an alphabetic system of signs that designate letters making up a word was developed by the Phoenicians and then the Canaanites in the second millennium BCE. Ancient Hebrew developed from the Canaanite alphabet.

Literacy in the ancient world was probably limited to members of the upper classes and to scribes employed by royal, administrative, and temple institutions. Writing reflected the needs of administrative officials to keep track of transactions like sales, taxes, lists, and personal or official letters. Writing also allowed the development of “literature” in the form of royal and religious public inscriptions, private documents, and religious literature.

Many people in lower classes probably had at best only functional literacy, enough to write or recognize their names and a few words for social and economic transactions. Most would have functioned in an oral world where memoirs, prayers, hymns, proverbs, and stories were memorized and handed down to the next generations. However, there were probably connections and overlaps between the oral and written cultures, one continuing to influence the other as both developed. And the public reading of official, royal, or religious documents, or visible writing on walls, buildings, and monuments, would have communicated information and values to an illiterate populace.

©2014 by Patricia Dutcher-Walls. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on Reading the Historical Books, click here.

New Release: Reading the Historical Books

Cover ArtBiblical history can be some of the most difficult material for beginning students to grasp. The conventions of contemporary history writing are quite different from those of ancient Israelite writers. In Reading the Historical Books, Patricia Dutcher-Walls offers basic orientation to the genre and conventions of the Old Testament historical books, helping students become careful and attentive readers.

——–

“For those coming to serious study of the Bible for the first time, there cannot be any more important lesson than to understand how to read the Bible’s ancient historical records faithfully on their own terms….You will not find a better or more sympathetic introductory book than this one to point you in the right direction.” – H. G. M. Williamson, University of Oxford

“This student’s guide is a model of clarity, economy, and explanatory skill. Writing in a straightforward and interesting style and spicing up her discussion with specific ancient and modern examples, Patricia Dutcher-Walls lays out a sensible reading plan for any who wish to take the Bible seriously in all its aspects: literary, historical, and theological…. [A] fine book that should gain a wide readership.” – V. Philips Long, Regent College, Vancouver

“Always sympathetically aware of its audiences, and with panels calling for reader involvement, this book will be an invaluable aid to all who have a serious interest in understanding these rich story-histories of the Old Testament.” – J. Gordon McConville, University of Gloucestershire

“This engaging guide to reading historical narrative in the Old Testament is a great text for beginners. Dutcher-Walls assumes little and draws on a wide variety of relevant texts and illustrations from the Bible, ancient Near Eastern sources, and especially modern historical texts and media contexts. There is nothing better for communicating basic principles of Hebrew Bible historiography to modern readers.” – Richard S. Hess, Denver Seminary

“[A]n excellent treatment of the principles of history writing that guided the historians of this corpus of biblical literature. A judicious examination of texts from ancient Near Eastern literature reveals that these same principles may be found in that larger body of texts as well. Further, she has demonstrated ably that an awareness by the contemporary reader of how these ancient historians told their stories will greatly assist one in engaging the biblical text.” – Victor P. Hamilton, Asbury University

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Patricia Dutcher-Walls (ThD, Graduate Theological Union) is professor of Hebrew scripture at Vancouver School of Theology, where she also gives administrative oversight to the school’s doctoral programs and serves as dean of studies and director of the library. She is the author of several books and a web-based Bible study curriculum. Ordained by the United Presbyterian Church (USA), she now serves as a minister in the Presbyterian Church in Canada.

For more information on Reading the Historical Books, click here.