BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 6, 2015

Cover ArtThe Christian Century featured an excerpt from Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Bonhoeffer reminds us that we must form our ministries around explorations of the living Christ. He also points us to the practical dispositions of doing youth ministry. He encourages us to do ministry through stories of our own faith life and to prayerfully seek composure, a spirit of calm. A calm disposition, coupled with narration, creates fertile ground for a depth of relationship (what Bonhoeffer called Stellvertretung or “place-sharing”) that mediates the presence of the living Christ..

Also, Root discussed Bonhoeffer and youth ministry in this month’s Christianity Today cover story, and Mark Husbands reviewed Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for the Hope College blog.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Gavin Ortlund at The Gospel Coalition, and by Derek Rishmawy at Reformedish.

At Don’t Stop Believing, Mike Wittmer reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Steve Bishop , at An Accidental Blog, also reviewed A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Reformation 21, Jon Coutts reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

D. A. Carson’s Praying With Paul was reviewed at Treasuring Christ.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

Caleb Spindler praised Jonathan Pennington’s Reading the Gospels Wisely.

The Etownian reported on a lecture by Mark Nation on key themes in Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

 

Leithart on Scripture, Tradition, and Reformed Catholicity

At First Things, Peter Leithart recently reflected on Scripture and Tradition in light of Michael Allen and Scott Swain’s Reformed Catholicity.

Cover Art“Allen and Swain offer an elegant, biblically grounded account of church tradition as a ‘fruit of the Spirit.’

Scripture is norm and foundation of all theology, but the Bible authorizes the Church to build on the apostolic foundation. Scripture isn’t inert but is given so that the truth of God might be internalized and embodied in the Church: ‘Scripture is a means to the end of church tradition.’

Tradition formation is the work of the Spirit, the teacher in the school of Christ, who anoints the Church and is personally active in the writing of creeds and confessions, the transmission of liturgical forms, catechetical training, and theological formulation. Though fallible and imperfect, these aren’t merely human products but ‘natural signs and instruments of the Spirit’s illuminating presence.’

Tradition signifies that the Word has been received, believed, and spoken by the Church, and it ensures that the Word continues to be received and passed on.”

You can read the rest here.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 30, 2015

Cover ArtMathew Sims, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed James K. A. Smith’s Imagining the Kingdom.

I cannot recommend Imagining the Kingdom highly enough. It’s a much needed corrective for the Church especially in our current climate where secular liturgies often are more formative. Christians have failed to tell and live our story in a way that’s believable and affective.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight reflected on Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation by Matthew Levering.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

At Books at a Glance, Adam Darbonne reviewed Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Jackson Watts, at the Helwys Society Forum, reviewed Beth Felker Jones’ Practicing Christian Doctrine.

Adonis Vidu’s Atonement, Law, and Justice was review at Pastor Dave Online.

Gary Ridley, at Send U, reviewed Effective Intercultural Communication by A. Scott Moreau, Evvy Hay Campbell and Susan Greener.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, is looking forward to Mikeal Parsons’ Paideia commentary on Luke.

Justin Taylor shared Thomas Schreiner’s reflections in The King in His Beauty on seeing the Trinity in Genesis 1:26.

At Lingering in Love, Ian McConnell has been working through Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, and Bonhoeffer’s eight theses on youth work. Read posts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

The Gospel Coalition shared 8 Lessons from the School of Prayer, an excerpt from D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul.

 

The Rule of Faith – an Excerpt from Reformed Catholicity

The following is an excerpt from Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

——–

The rule of faith offers a promising orientation or starting point for the reading of Scripture, an orientation within which our understanding of Scripture can grow.

Cover ArtMoreover, because it summarizes scriptural teaching on God and God’s unfolding economy of salvation, the rule of faith not only provides readers with a starting point for exegesis, it also identifies the goal of exegesis, which is to expound each particular text with an eye toward the broad horizons of scriptural teaching as a whole. In other words, the rule of faith serves as a benchmark for canonical exegesis.

In this regard, the rule of faith also helps readers guard against a theologically reductionistic exegesis which would turn every text into the occasion for teaching a favorite doctrine—or for engaging a favorite controversy.

The question for the Christian interpreter therefore is not whether or not to read Holy Scripture in light of the rule of faith. The question is whether to read Holy Scripture with a right faith (i.e., orthodoxy), oriented toward the Triune God, drawn from the main contours of biblical teaching, and confessed by Scripture’s faithful servant the church (cf. 1 Tim. 3:15), or whether to read Holy Scripture with a wrong faith (i.e., heterodoxy), drawn from some other purported source of wisdom and knowledge, and governed by the ends of some other community.

Reading Scripture in light of the rule of faith is a way of acknowledging that, when it comes to biblical interpretation, sola Scriptura (Scripture’s status as the sole supreme authority for faith and life) cannot function appropriately as an interpretive norm apart from tota Scriptura (Scripture’s teaching in its entirety). And Scripture’s teaching in its entirety includes teaching about divinely authorized, subordinate authorities that have a role to play in biblical instruction and interpretation. The sacred script not only announces the saving drama that has unfolded “behind the text,” it also directs the ecclesial drama that unfolds “in front of the text.”

©2015 by Michael Allen and Scott R. Swain. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

——–

For more information on Reformed Catholicity, click here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 16, 2015

Cover ArtByron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, named J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth as 2014’s Best Book Of Biblical Studies.

“What a book!…There is no doubt in my mind that this book is urgently needed — among evangelicals and mainline folks alike — to be fully clear about God’s promises of new creation, and how this vision of a restored Earth can animate and sustain our efforts for cultural reform now. Richard is an excellent Biblical scholar and has worked on this serious volume for years; the endorsements have been robust and exceptional, and early readers report it is nearly life-changing.”

Also in his Best Books of 2014 post, Borger gave a double award (Best New Contribution to Bonhoeffer Studies and Best Youth Ministry Book) to Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker by Andrew Root, and an honorable mention to From Every Tribe and Nation by Mark Noll and Reading a Different Story by Susan VanZanten.

At The Hump of the Camel, Jon Garvey reviewed A New Heaven and a New Earth.

RJS continued to discuss Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth in the post “The End of the World” at Jesus Creed.

J. Richard Middleton wrote “God’s Bringing Creation to Its Glorious Destiny” for The High Calling.

Chris Woznicki reviewed Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

At First Things, Peter Leithart reflected on the discussion of Reinhold Hutter in Reformed Catholicity.

Reformed Catholicity was listed in The Aquila Report’s New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.

At Panorama of a Book Saint, Conrade Yap reviewed Effective Intercultural Communication by A. Scott Moreau, Evvy Hay Campbell, and Susan Greener.

Christopher Skinner, at Crux Sola, reviewed Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite.

Daniel Gullotta reviewed Ancient Christian Worship by Andrew McGowan.

Elodie Ballantine Emig reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek for the Denver Journal.

At Theosblog, Lawrence Osborn reviewed Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At The Jesus Blog, Anthony LeDonne named Dale Allison’s Constructing Jesus as the best Jesus book of the 2010’s.

Robert Johnston, author of God’s Wider Presence, was interviewed in Tehelka Magazine.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 19, 2014

Cover ArtAt The Englewood Review of Books, Jeanne Lehninger reviewed Roger Lundin’s Beginning with the Word.

“Lundin is a wonderful teacher who explicates clearly why contemporary thought regarding language and literature is what it is and what the implications are for the church. Not merely an academic treatise, Beginning with the Word both begins and ends in delight and wisdom. Best of all, Lundin answers the question of why it matters that words are more than symbols. That they are reflections of the Word made flesh makes them bearers of truth and grace.”

Also, Roger Lundin was interviewed about Beginning with the Word on the Christian Humanist Podcast.

At the Strong Towns Podcast, Charles Marohn interviewed Eric Jacobson, author of The Space Between.

Wyatt Graham, at Writings and Reviews, reviewed Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea.

Michael Allen, author of Justification and the Gospel, wrote “The Desire and Joy of the Gospel” for Good News.

At Philonica et Neotestamentica, Torrey Seland quoted from Jesus against the Scribal Elite, by Chris Keith.

Finally, Graham Twelftree, author of Paul and the Miraculous, gave a lecture entitled “The Historian and the Miraculous“.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 12, 2014

Cover ArtFaith & Leadership featured Take it from Bonhoeffer — there is no ‘Christian youth’, from Andrew Root’s forthcoming Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“To label the young ‘Christian youth,’ Bonhoeffer believes, is to make faith bound not in their humanity and the eschatological work of Christ, not in the wrestling of their being, but in this episodic time of ‘special privilege’ created by culture. Faith becomes a fashion, a particular, distinct period during which you are loyal to something before moving on to something else.

Your ‘Christian-ness’ is bound in your ‘youthfulness.’ Once youthfulness fades with age or new lifestyle commitments, so too can ‘Christian.’ ‘Christian’ was an adjective you used to describe your high school days. As you outgrow the privileged space (especially the youth group), as you outgrow your youth, you outgrow ‘Christian.’”

Also, I Read Too Much shared a pre-release review of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Jarvis Williams reviewed Douglas Moo’s Galatians BECNT volume for Books at a Glance.

Dennis Hamm, S.J, author of the Philippians, Colossians, Philemon volume in the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture (CCSS), was interviewed by the Center for Catholic Thought.

Daniel Keating’s CCSS volume on First and Second Peter, Jude was reviewed at RBL by Abson Joseph.

Antonius, at Stages of Prayer, reviewed the Acts of the Apostles volume of the CCSS, by William Kurz, SJ.

Adam Kurihara reflected on the mall and Apple in light of James K. A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Nick Nowalk, at The Strange Triumph of the Lamb, shared a quote on holiness and mission from The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

At The Gospel Coalition, Gavin Ortlund interviewed Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching.

Chris Woznicki, at Think Out Loud, is looking forward to forthcoming Baker Academic titles from Michael Allen and Scott Swain, Matthew Levering, Simon Gathercole, and Christopher Seitz.