BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 3, 2014

Cover ArtAt Books & Culture, Brett Beasley reviewed Robert Johnston’s forthcoming book God’s Wider Presence.

Johnston succeeds in carefully analyzing our transcendent experiences while preserving their unpredictability. He shows that, while we can usefully talk about God’s wider presence—we can muse over it like a scientist might muse over a Lichtenberg Figure created by a bolt of lightning—we can’t tame it; where and when it strikes will always surprise us.

At First Things, Peter Leithart reflected on Atonement, Law, and Justice by Adonis Vidu.

Chris Woznicki reviewed Atonement, Law, and Justice.

Eric Covington, at The Two Cities, reviewed Daniel Block’s For the Glory of God.

Also reviewing For the Glory of God were Michael Philliber at Deus Misereatur, and TheGuffmanSmoketh who shared this video review.

From Every Tribe and Nation, by Mark Noll, was recommended by Byron Borger at Hearts & Minds Books.

Aaron, at wrestlinginspiredfaith, reviewed Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker by Andrew Root.

David Haines reviewed Matthew Levering’s The Theology of Augustine.

At Grace for Sinners, Joshua Torrey reviewed The Original Bishops by Alistair C. Stewart.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 12, 2014

Cover ArtFaith & Leadership featured Take it from Bonhoeffer — there is no ‘Christian youth’, from Andrew Root’s forthcoming Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“To label the young ‘Christian youth,’ Bonhoeffer believes, is to make faith bound not in their humanity and the eschatological work of Christ, not in the wrestling of their being, but in this episodic time of ‘special privilege’ created by culture. Faith becomes a fashion, a particular, distinct period during which you are loyal to something before moving on to something else.

Your ‘Christian-ness’ is bound in your ‘youthfulness.’ Once youthfulness fades with age or new lifestyle commitments, so too can ‘Christian.’ ‘Christian’ was an adjective you used to describe your high school days. As you outgrow the privileged space (especially the youth group), as you outgrow your youth, you outgrow ‘Christian.’”

Also, I Read Too Much shared a pre-release review of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Jarvis Williams reviewed Douglas Moo’s Galatians BECNT volume for Books at a Glance.

Dennis Hamm, S.J, author of the Philippians, Colossians, Philemon volume in the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture (CCSS), was interviewed by the Center for Catholic Thought.

Daniel Keating’s CCSS volume on First and Second Peter, Jude was reviewed at RBL by Abson Joseph.

Antonius, at Stages of Prayer, reviewed the Acts of the Apostles volume of the CCSS, by William Kurz, SJ.

Adam Kurihara reflected on the mall and Apple in light of James K. A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Nick Nowalk, at The Strange Triumph of the Lamb, shared a quote on holiness and mission from The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

At The Gospel Coalition, Gavin Ortlund interviewed Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching.

Chris Woznicki, at Think Out Loud, is looking forward to forthcoming Baker Academic titles from Michael Allen and Scott Swain, Matthew Levering, Simon Gathercole, and Christopher Seitz.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 14, 2014

Cover ArtIn honor of the recently released seventh edition of D. A. Carson’s New Testament Commentary Survey, Matt Smethurst at The Gospel Coalition interviewed Carson about what makes a good commentary.

“Good all-round commentaries help readers think their way through the text—which requires adequate handling of words, sentences, flow of thought, genre, theological presuppositions, knowledge of historical setting, and, ideally, a commentary writer who is humble and of a contrite spirit and who trembles at God’s Word. But most commentaries do not do all these things (and other things—e.g., interaction with some other commentaries) equally well. That is one of the reasons one is usually wise to consult at least two or three commentaries with different emphases.”

At The Jesus Blog, Anthony Le Donne briefly reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Also reviewing Levering’s The Theology of Augustine was Nate Claiborne.

Jennifer Guo, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed R. Michael Allen’s Justification and the Gospel.

Moschos Goutzioudis reviewed The New Testament by Donald A. Hagner, for RBL.

At Raw Christianity, David Gunner Gundersen reviewed The Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations by Michael Holmes.

The Christian Century reviewed Reading a Different Story, by Susan VanZanten.

Steve Bishop, at An Accidental Blog, reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, and interviewed James Skillen about his forthcoming book The Good of Politics.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 7, 2014

Cover ArtTony Campolo reflected on The Early Church on Killing, by Ron Sider.

“The book of Hebrews reminds us that we are ‘surrounded with a great crowd of witnesses’ to which we must be responsible in all that we do, but especially in our interpretations of the Holy Writ. As Ron Sider makes his case against Christians participating in war, supporting capital punishment, or justifying abortion, he supports his beliefs by resorting to the writings of some of the earliest Church leaders, and thus, takes Church tradition seriously.”

At Euangelion, Michael Bird reviewed Craig Keener’s Acts, Volume 2.

Joseph Sherrard, at Transpositions, reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Tim Challies recommended Grant Osborne’s Revelation volume in the BECNT series.

Rod Whitacre’s Patristic Greek Reader was recommended by Ben Witherington.

At The Anxious Bench, David Swartz reflected on Why Study History? by John Fea.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Abram K-J, at Words on the Word, reviewed Steve Moyise’s Jesus and Scripture.

At The Christian Manifesto, Calvin Moore reviewed The End of Apologetics by Myron Penner.

Phil Long reviewed Darrell Bock’s Jesus according to Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 16, 2013

Cover ArtConrade Yap reviewed Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics on his blog, Panorama of a Book Saint.

“Penner weaves in the perspectives of Alistair MacIntyre, Soren Kierkergaard, and to some extent, John G Stackhouse, and slowly builds up his case to argue for a new form of Apologetics. This form will be a shift away from epistemological paradigms toward a hermeneutics of faith.”

Jonathan Pennington, author of Reading the Gospels Wisley, addressed the question What Is the Unforgivable Sin?

In the latest issue of Themelios, Christopher Beetham reviewed Markus Bockmuehl’s Simon Peter in Scripture and Memory.

David Horrell reviewed Moral Formation According to Paul by James Thompson, and Stephen Moyise reviewed G.K. Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, both for RBL.

Bob Trube reviewed Inspiration and Incarnation, and The Evolution of Adam, by Peter Enns.

At The Reformed Register, Don Haflich reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Josh Hayes reviewed Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty for the Southern Resources Blog.

New Release: The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering

Most theology students realize Augustine is tremendously influential on the Christian tradition as a whole, but they generally lack real knowledge of his writings. This volume introduces Augustine’s theology through seven of his most important works.

Matthew Levering begins with a discussion of Augustine’s life and times and then provides a full survey of the argument of each work with bibliographical references for those who wish to go further.

Written in clear, accessible language, this book offers an essential introduction to major works of Augustine that all students of theology–and their professors!–need to know.

“Matthew Levering applies his characteristic clarity of exposition and acuity of analysis to seven major works of Augustine; the result wonderfully substantiates his introductory claim that ‘Augustine speaks as powerfully today as he did sixteen hundred years ago.'”
Khaled Anatolios, professor of historical theology, Boston College School of Theology and Ministry

“Levering offers to students the best introduction to Augustine devised so far. He makes clear that Augustine himself was no ‘Augustinian’; even though he invented subjective angst and had an acute sense of sin, Augustine was also a humanist and a profound metaphysician. This book successfully inducts us into the bishop of Hippo’s integral blend of soul-searching, critical reading of sacred texts, ontological reflection, and social activism.”
John Milbank, professor of religion, politics, and ethics, University of Nottingham

Matthew Levering (PhD, Boston College) is professor of religious studies at the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio. He is the author or editor of numerous books, including Ezra & Nehemiah in the Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible. He is also coauthor of Holy People, Holy Land and Knowing the Love of Christ.
——————–
For more information on The Theology of Augustine, click here.