BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 6, 2015

Cover ArtThe Christian Century featured an excerpt from Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Bonhoeffer reminds us that we must form our ministries around explorations of the living Christ. He also points us to the practical dispositions of doing youth ministry. He encourages us to do ministry through stories of our own faith life and to prayerfully seek composure, a spirit of calm. A calm disposition, coupled with narration, creates fertile ground for a depth of relationship (what Bonhoeffer called Stellvertretung or “place-sharing”) that mediates the presence of the living Christ..

Also, Root discussed Bonhoeffer and youth ministry in this month’s Christianity Today cover story, and Mark Husbands reviewed Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for the Hope College blog.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Gavin Ortlund at The Gospel Coalition, and by Derek Rishmawy at Reformedish.

At Don’t Stop Believing, Mike Wittmer reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Steve Bishop , at An Accidental Blog, also reviewed A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Reformation 21, Jon Coutts reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

D. A. Carson’s Praying With Paul was reviewed at Treasuring Christ.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

Caleb Spindler praised Jonathan Pennington’s Reading the Gospels Wisely.

The Etownian reported on a lecture by Mark Nation on key themes in Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 25, 2014

Cover ArtDavid Koyzis, at Christian Courier, reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

“Readers have come to appreciate the wisdom and insight that Skillen has displayed in his work over the years. This new book certainly lives up to our expectations. The Good of Politics is a biblically and historically rich primer on the political life for everyone persuaded that the claims of Christ extend to our calling as citizens.”

Also reviewing The Good of Politics, Tim Hoiland for The Englewood Review of Books.

Richard G. Smith reviewed Tremper Longman’s commentary on Job, for RBL.

Mark Votava, at Culture of Imagination, reviewed Where Mortals Dwell by Craig Bartholomew.

At Evangelicals for Social Action, Bryan Stafford reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel. Look to the comments for a response by Nation.

Joshua Torrey, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed The New Testament and Ethics, edited by Joel Green.

James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Phil Newton reviewed Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching for 9 Marks.

Tim Ghali, at Black Coffee Reflections, reviewed the Church and Postmodern Culture series.

Douglas Moo was interviewed by the Logos Academic Blog about his Galatians volume in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 18, 2014

Cover ArtThe Institute for Sacred Architecture reviewed The Space Between, by Eric Jacobsen.

“Jacobsen artfully weaves together the linear progression of the story of redemption, which starts in the Garden and ends in the Heavenly City, with our understanding of the urban environment. He states that in our place and time we are not yet in the Heavenly City; however, we can and should work toward it.”

G.K Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew, and Rolf Jacobson and Karl Jacobson’s Invitation to the Psalms were reviewed in the Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament.

Daniel Waldschmidt, at the Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary Blog, reviewed Galatians by Douglas Moo.

At Scriptorium Daily, Matt Jenson recommended the Turning South series; comprised of Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice, Susan VanZanten’s Reading a Different Story, and Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Jordon Stone recommended Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, at the Ordinary Ministry blog.

At Daily Theology, Krista Stevens reflected on The Gospel of Mark by Francis Moloney.

David Naugle listed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel, in the Cardus summer reading list.

The Logos Academic Blog interviewed Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, interviewed Christopher Hays, co-editor of Evangelicals and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, as part of his ongoing “Aha” Moments series.

 

Video: Bonhoeffer the Assassin? (Part 2)

Bonhoeffer the Pacifist?

Reclaiming Bonhoeffer’s Witness

Cover ArtAbout the Book: Most of us think we know the moving story of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s life–a pacifist pastor turns anti-Hitler conspirator due to horrors encountered during World War II–but does the evidence really support this prevailing view? This pioneering work carefully examines the biographical and textual evidence and finds no support for the theory that Bonhoeffer abandoned his ethic of discipleship and was involved in plots to assassinate Hitler. In fact, Bonhoeffer consistently affirmed a strong stance of peacemaking from 1932 to the end of his life, and his commitment to peace was integrated with his theology as a whole.

“Nation, Siegrist, and Umbel challenge the widely-held assumption that after the beginning of World War II Bonhoeffer not only participated in the anti-Nazi conspiracy but set aside his earlier pacifism and adopted a more ‘rational’ and ‘realistic’ stance, which included participation in the plot to assassinate Hitler. The close readings of Bonhoeffer’s biography set in the larger story of the conspiracy and of the Ethics manuscript, in which the more realistic account is supposedly found, are of particular value. Regardless of whether you are persuaded by the authors concerning Bonhoeffer’s level of involvement in the attempt to kill Hitler, this volume will decisively reframe the way we read the thought and life of this most remarkable Christian.” – Barry Harvey, Baylor University

“This book offers a well-researched, well-thought-through argument that demands attention from anyone interested in the legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. It is a new look at his life and work that offers a critical lens on traditional interpretations of his devotion to the Sermon on the Mount in the face of real life crisis. These authors are to be applauded for this significant contribution.” – Reggie L. Williams, McCormick Theological Seminary

For more information on Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, click here.

Video: Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

Why did you write Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

Bonhoeffer the Realist?

Bonhoeffer the Conscientious Objector?

Cover ArtAbout the Book: Most of us think we know the moving story of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s life–a pacifist pastor turns anti-Hitler conspirator due to horrors encountered during World War II–but does the evidence really support this prevailing view? This pioneering work carefully examines the biographical and textual evidence and finds no support for the theory that Bonhoeffer abandoned his ethic of discipleship and was involved in plots to assassinate Hitler. In fact, Bonhoeffer consistently affirmed a strong stance of peacemaking from 1932 to the end of his life, and his commitment to peace was integrated with his theology as a whole.

“This extensively researched and passionately argued book will invariably provoke discussion in Bonhoeffer studies as it challenges misconceptions of his role as assassin and patriot. It persuasively reconciles Bonhoeffer’s pacifist writings with his political activities in the Abwehr, as well as themes of pacifist obedience with political responsibility often separated by Niebuhrian ‘political realist’ readings. This is an invaluable study of Bonhoeffer’s theological ethics that must be taken seriously.” – David Haddorff, St. John’s University

“If you mention Bonhoeffer, just about everyone thinks of his involvement in a conspiracy to kill Hitler. This becomes a major key–sometimes the key–to interpreting his writings. This fascinating book not only questions this assumption but also shows what happens when you read him without it. A thoroughly engaging book.” – Arne Rasmusson, University of Gothenburg

For more information on Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, click here.

Kristallnacht – an Excerpt from Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

Cover ArtThe following is an excerpt from Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony G. Siegrist, and Daniel P. Umbel.

——–

November 9, 1938, was the most blatant expression to date of anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany. That night, throughout Germany, many synagogues were set ablaze and many Jewish homes and businesses devastated. Many Jews were tortured; approximately one hundred were murdered and over thirty thousand were sent to concentration camps. Because of all the glass that was broken, the night has come to be called Kristallnacht.

The ostensible justification for this orgy of violence was the assassination, two days earlier, of a German ambassador in Paris by a Polish Jew. The following Sunday, in a sermon of repentance, Pastor Julius von Jan of Oberlenningen, Württemberg, said:

Who would have thought that this single crime in Paris could result in so many crimes committed here in Germany? Now we are facing the consequences of our great apostasy, our falling away from God and Christ, of organized anti-Christianity. Passions are being unleashed and the commandments of God ignored. Houses of God which were sacred for others are being burned down, the property of others is being plundered or destroyed. Men who have served our nation loyally and conscientiously fulfilled their duties have been thrown into concentration camps, merely because they belong to another race. Those in authority may not admit to any injustice, but to the healthy good sense of our people it is quite clear, even though no one dares speak of it.

Pastor von Jan was dragged out of his manse by five hundred demonstrators who were from outside his village; he was then beaten severely. He was later interrogated by the authorities and thrown into prison, where he remained until the end of the war.

However, Pastor von Jan’s response was unusual. Most of the Confessing Church was silent about this night—and its aftermath. Bonhoeffer himself was in a forest with his ordinands on the night of Kristallnacht and only learned about it after the fact. However, later “in the Bible that Bonhoeffer used for prayer and meditation he underlined the verse in Psalm 74, ‘they burned all the meeting places of God in the land,’ and wrote beside it ‘9.11.38.’ He also underlined the next verse, adding an exclamation mark: ‘We do not see our signs; there is no longer any prophet, and there is none among us who knows how long.’”

©2013 by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony G. Siegrist, and Daniel P. Umbel. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

——–

For more information on Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, click here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 3, 2014

Cover ArtAt Euangelion, Joel Willitts reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, and Scot McKnight named it one of the Jesus Creed Books of the Year.

“[A] book that will surely create conversations for a decade about whether or not Bonhoeffer was involved in the conspiracy to assassinate Hitler.”

Brett McCracken, Marc Cortez, and Tim Hoiland all named James K.A. Smith’s Imagining the Kingdom as one of their favorite books of 2013.

David Firth reviewed Invitation to the Psalms, by Rolf Jacobson and Karl Jacobson, for RBL.

Byron Borger at Hearts and Minds reviewed and recommended Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Justification and the Gospel, by Michael Allen; Reading the Gospels Wisely, by Jonathan Pennington; and Paul and the Early Jewish Encounter with Deuteronomy, by David Lincicum were all named in Mockingbird’s list of The Top Theology Books of 2013.

Graham Ware’s Top Reads of 2013 included J. R. Daniel Kirk’s Jesus Have I Loved, But Paul? and Craig Keener’s Paul, Women & Wives.

David Moore listed Why Study History? by John Fea  in his Favorite Books of 2013.

Matt Mitchell reviewed Understanding Spiritual Warfare: Four Views, edited by James Beilby and Paul Eddy.

——–

eBook Special

Through Thursday, January 9, the eBook of Preaching and Teaching the Last Things by Walter C. Kaiser Jr. is available for $3.99 (80% off) at participating retailers, including:

Amazon
Apple
Barnes & Noble
CBD

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 15, 2013

Cover ArtAt Englewood Review of Books, Shaun Brown reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel.

“[A] novel and valuable contribution to Bonhoeffer scholarship. The book demonstrates Bonhoeffer’s commitment to peace and opposing injustice, and will likely lead to further reexaminations of Bonhoeffer’s life and work.”

Dave Hershey reviewed Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics.

Anthony Le Donne shared a story from Stanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament, at The Jesus Blog.

Richard Muller’s Calvin and the Reformed Tradition was reviewed by Julián Gutiérrez for The Gospel Coalition.

Lazo at Doctrine on Tap reviewed The King in His Beauty, by Thomas Schreiner.

Trent Nicholson reviewed Foundations for Youth Ministry, by Dean Borgman.

Phil Aud reviewed Journey toward Justice, by Nicholas Wolterstorff.

——–

eBook Special

Through Thursday, November 21, the eBook of Strategic Pastoral Counseling by David Benner is available for $3.99 (76% off) at participating retailers, including:

Amazon
Apple
Barnes & Noble
CBD

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 1, 2013

Cover ArtAt Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel.

“I consider this book a successful challenge to the ruling paradigm that sees a major shift in Bonhoeffer from his idealism of Discipleship to a realist posture in Ethics….I no longer think Bonhoeffer made a tragic mistake in entering into the conspiracy and so shifted from his pacifism because I’m not convinced he entered into the conspiracy. Bonhoeffer may well have sustained his pacifism.”

At Reformation21, Jonathan Huggins reviewed Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

Ryan Brymer reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism?, for FaithVillage.com

In his post “Holy Communion, Culture, & Vocation“, Gene Veith reflected on a quote from James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Tim Challis featured Tremper Longman’s Proverbs volume from the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms series, in his Best Commentaries on Proverbs list.

At Thoughts on Theology, Andy Naselli recommended The World of the New Testament, edited by Joel Green and Lee McDonald.

Alan Padgett, author of As Christ Submits to the Church, will be lecturing at Thrive.

Moody Radio recently hosted two interviews with John Fea about his book Why Study History? You can listen here, and here.

——–

eBook Specials

Today only, Friday November 1, the Commentary on Revelation eBook by Robert Gundry is available free at participating retailers, including:

Amazon

Apple

Barnes & Noble

CBD

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 25, 2013

Cover ArtGeorge Wood reviewed Why Study History? by John Fea.

“Fea pitches his book primarily to college students interested in the study of history as a major, but also to history teachers and history buffs. I fall into the last category. And as a history buff, I thoroughly enjoyed and highly recommend this book, for several reasons.”

Mark Thiessen Nation responded to Roger Olson’s review of Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

Christopher Skinner at Peje Iesous shared some first thoughts about Francis Moloney’s Love in the Gospel of John.

Preaching.com reviewed Hermeneutics, by Henry Virkler and Karelynne Gerber Ayayo.

At Christianity Today, Brandon O’Brien reviewed The Suffering and Victorious Christ, by Richard Mouw and Douglas Sweeney.

——–

eBook Specials

Today only, Friday October 25, the Commentary on James eBook by Robert Gundry is available free at participating retailers. Learn more here.