BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 8, 2015

Cover ArtAt Jesus Creed, RJS discusses Israel’s election in light of Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology.

Moberly reflects on this election of Israel by God and the sense of wonder and devotion to God that it should bring to the people. God’s election of Israel reflects his love of Israel and this is an end in itself. “It is justified in the way that love is justified – and love is its own justification. … Fundamentally, however, love transcends rationalizations.”

Justin Taylor, at The Gospel Coalition, shared quotes on Apocalyptic Literature and What It Says that We Gather from James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

At Lonely Vocations, Matthew Forrest Lowe reviewed A New Heaven and a New Earth by J. Richard Middleton.

James, at Thoughts, Prayers & Songs, reviewed Matthew Schlimm’s This Strange and Sacred Scripture.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick, was reviewed at Intelmin Apologetics.

CHOICE connect reviewed Robert Johnston’s God’s Wider Presence.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Praying with Paul by D.A. Carson.

Chris Woznicki shared a quote on Trinity and Election from George Hunsinger’s Reading Barth with Charity.

Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, was interviewed on the Aqueduct Project’s GOD Talks podcast.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 10, 2015

Cover ArtKevin Brown, at Diglotting, reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by N. T. Wright, Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, and John Frederick.

Whether you are involved in biblical studies or theological studies, this volume will surely have something you can enjoy. It is a fantastic read for anyone interested in current issues swirling about regarding Galatians.

RBL featured two reviews of Acts of the Apostles by William Kurz, one from Thomas Phillips and the other from Troy Troftgruben.

At The Budding Exegete, Kenneth Litwak reviewed Donald Hagner’s The New Testament (part 1, part 2).

Andrew Spencer, at Ethics and Culture, reviewed Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation.

At Pursuing Veritas, Jacob J. Prahlow reviewed Encountering the New Testament by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough.

Sherif Gendy, at Arabish Biblical Theology, reviewed Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, edited by Hans Madueme and Michael Reeves.

Brandon Ambrosino quoted from John Caputo’s What Would Jesus Deconstruct? in the Boston Globe article Jesus’ Radical Politics.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 20, 2015

Cover ArtAt First Things, Phillip Cary reviewed Reading Barth with Charity by George Hunsinger.

Like all great theologians, Barth stands under the judgment of the tradition, even as he inspires us to new thinking within it. By his resolute insistence on knowing God only in the Word of Christ, Barth reinvigorates a distinctively Protestant witness within the tradition, which those who love orthodoxy would be ill advised to ignore.

Paul Adams, at ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ, shared part one and part two of his review of J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Exegetical.Tools, Warren Campbell reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliot, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

James, at Thoughts, Prayers, and Songs, reviewed Bryan Litfin’s Early Christian Martyr Stories.

Allen Mickle reviewed Praying with Paul by D. A. Carson.

Micha Bales reflected on sustainability and ecological catastrophe in light of Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A.J. Swoboda.

Timothy George interviewed Mark Noll about his new memoir, From Every Tribe and Nation.

Richard Hess, co-editor of Ancient Israel’s History, wrote How to Judge Evidence for the Exodus for Mosaic Magazine.

At Bible History Daily, Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, asked if Jesus was truly a radical and inclusive host.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 6, 2015

Cover ArtThe Christian Century featured an excerpt from Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Bonhoeffer reminds us that we must form our ministries around explorations of the living Christ. He also points us to the practical dispositions of doing youth ministry. He encourages us to do ministry through stories of our own faith life and to prayerfully seek composure, a spirit of calm. A calm disposition, coupled with narration, creates fertile ground for a depth of relationship (what Bonhoeffer called Stellvertretung or “place-sharing”) that mediates the presence of the living Christ..

Also, Root discussed Bonhoeffer and youth ministry in this month’s Christianity Today cover story, and Mark Husbands reviewed Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for the Hope College blog.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Gavin Ortlund at The Gospel Coalition, and by Derek Rishmawy at Reformedish.

At Don’t Stop Believing, Mike Wittmer reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Steve Bishop , at An Accidental Blog, also reviewed A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Reformation 21, Jon Coutts reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

D. A. Carson’s Praying With Paul was reviewed at Treasuring Christ.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

Caleb Spindler praised Jonathan Pennington’s Reading the Gospels Wisely.

The Etownian reported on a lecture by Mark Nation on key themes in Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 9, 2015

Cover ArtDerek Rishmawy, at The Gospel Coalition, explains “Why You Should Read Bavinck.”

“Bavinck’s accomplishment in the Dogmatics is nothing short of jaw-dropping. The expansive, nuanced, and deeply trinitarian theological vision is both intellectually challenging and spiritually nourishing. I anticipate turning to these volumes regularly in the years to come.”

Reviews

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed at Euangelion.

Craig Blomberg reviewed A Peaceable Hope by David Neville, as well as The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, for the Denver Journal here and here.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Exploring Psychology and Christian Faith, by Paul Moes and Donald Tellinghuisen.

Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite was reviewed at CHOICE connect.

At Discovering the Mission of God, Ed reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed at Diglotting.

Michael Philliber, at Deus Misereatur, reviewed The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

Best Of

As 2014 came to a close, quite a number of Baker Academic titles were featured in “Best of” posts.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, John Frederick, Scott Hafemann and N.T. Wright, was named as one of “The Top (Mockingbird) Theology Books of 2014.”

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta listed Chris Keith’s Jesus Against the Scribal Elite, Galatians and Christian Theology, Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth among the “Best New Testament Academic Books of 2014.”

Women in the World of the Earliest Christians by Lynn Cohick, Wealth and Poverty in Early Church and Society edited by Susan Holman, Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey, The Economy of Desire by Daniel Bell, and Loving the Poor, Saving the Rich by Helen Rhee were all in Alvin Rapien’s “Top 10 Books of 2014.”

The Missio Alliance Essential Reading List of 2014” featured Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At Reformation 21, Michael Allen and Scott Swain’s Reformed Catholicity, Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution, Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan’s The Pastor as Public Theologian, and Richard Bauckham’s Gospel of Glory were noted as “New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.”

Elsewhere

Scot McKnight reflected on Alistair Stewart’s The Original Bishops in the post “Paul and the Economic Justice Vision of Jesus“, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth led to his discussion “Revolution in Eschatology Today?

Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, wrote “Incarnation and Epiphany: How Christmas became a Christian Feast” for ABC Religion and Ethics.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 19, 2014

Cover ArtAllen Mickle Jr. reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

“Dr. Decker met with me to encourage me to consider using his pre-published Greek text. He gave me a copy to review, and after working through much of the text, I found it a superior version for teaching. Here are my thoughts on why you should consider Decker for first year Greek instruction.”

Seumas Macdonald, at The Patrologist, is working through Reading Koine Greek. You can read his reflections here: Part 1, part 2, part 3.

Chris Woznicki reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

At Unsettled Christianity, Joel Watts reviewed Atonement, Law, and Justice by Adonis Vidu.

Ed Smither reviewed Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea.

At Faith and History, Robert Tracy McKenzie reflected on Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Bryan Litfin, author of Early Christian Martyr Stories, was interviewed on Chris Fabrey Live!

William Tabbernee was interviewed on The Janet Mefferd Show, about his new book, Early Christianity in Contexts.

Adonis Vidu discussed Atonement, Law, and Justice at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 12, 2014

Cover ArtMark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation was recommended by Robert Tracy McKenzie at Faith and History.

“It’s essentially the story of his personal spiritual and intellectual journey, with an emphasis on the way that Noll’s engagement with Christianity in other parts of the world has deepened his faith. But as every historian knows, you can visit foreign countries by traveling through time as well as space. Noll illustrates that truth wonderfully in the book’s second chapter, ‘Rescued by the Reformation.’”

At Crux Sola, Christopher Skinner recommended Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, edited by Christopher Hays and Christopher Ansberry.

Rodney Clapp, at Running Heads, reflected on holistic eschatology and J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott, was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N.T. Wright, and John Frederick, was reviewed at ἐνθύμησις.

Ed Smither reviewed Scott Sunquist’s Understanding Christian Mission.

Steven Bouma-Prediger, author of For the Beauty of the Earth, wrote the article “Trees, Healing, and Hope” for Sojourners.

David Gowler, who is writing a book on the reception history of the parables, celebrated the one year anniversary of his blog A Chorus of Voices.

At Reformedish, Derek Rishmawy recommended Adonis Vidu’s Atonement, Law, and Justice as one of his 5 Best Books of 2014.

At First Things, Wesley Hill recommended Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology.

J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth, and Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, were named as Jesus Creed Books of the Year by Scot McKnight.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 14, 2014

Cover ArtByron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, praised Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

“It may be that the just released A New Heaven and a New Earth…is the most important book in its field, a magnificent, innovative, lasting contribution to the field of Biblical studies. I can hardly overstate just how significant this new book is.”

Graham Twelftree’s Paul and the Miraculous was reviewed by Brian LePort, who also reflected on Twelftree’s discussion of the Pseudepigraphal Paul.

At Lonely Vocations, Matthew Forrest Lowe reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight ‘s post Teaching Discipleship to Youth continued his series on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

CHOICE recommended Beginning with the Word by Roger Lundin, and Who’s Afraid of Relativism? by James K.A. Smith. You can read the respective reviews here and here.

At Shared Justice, Becca Mcbride reflected on Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice.

And finally, James K.A. Smith responded to a common critique of Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

“When one is committed to a representationalist picture of the world—indeed, when one has basically drunk in such a picture with mother’s milk—it is virtually impossible to see things otherwise: This is how things are! Questioning representation and correspondence would be akin to questioning reality itself. Indeed, not only are alternatives not entertained; they cannot even be understood.”

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 26, 2014

Cover ArtAt First Things, Peter Leithart reviewed Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship.

“Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship is a very fine introduction to the subject. Though it is up-to-date academically, and, as McGowan says, includes the results of some of his own research, it is accessibly written, clearly organized, and highly informative.”

Dan Miller, at the Calvin history department’s Historical Horizons blog, reviewed The Good of Politics, by James Skillen.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta shared part one of his review of James Thompson’s The Church according to Paul.

G. Wright Doyle, at the Global China Center, reviewed Understanding Christian Mission, by Scott Sunquist.

Abram K-J, at Words on the Word, recommended Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Michael Hansen reflected on James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Larry Hurtado discussed major commentaries on Acts, including the third volume of Craig Keener’s Acts: An Exegetical Commentary.

At Euangelion, Joel Willitts recommended Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

Barth on Atonement and Election – an Excerpt from Galatians and Christian Theology

The following is an excerpt from Bruce McCormack’s essay “Can We Still Speak of ‘Justification by Faith’?” in Galatians and Christian Theology.

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Cover Art“How is Christ “made sin” for us? John Calvin answered, “Through the mechanism of imputation.” The guilt of human sin is “transferred” to the God-human—probably at the point when Christ says in the garden, “Not my will, but yours be done.”

Barth’s answer looks in a different direction. In his soteriology, the doctrine of election does all the heavy lifting that the idea of imputation had done for Calvin. The God-human does not need to have the guilt that accrues to the sins of the elect imputed to him; he already is “the sinner” by virtue of God’s eternal choosing of himself in Christ to be the “reprobate” human. God chooses reprobation as his portion so that it will not be ours.

Thus Christ is “made sin” already in election. His embrace of the full consequences of human sinfulness (suffering, death, and perdition) is the concrete realization in time of what the God-human already is in pretemporal eternity—by way of anticipation. Moreover, Christ’s embrace of the full consequences of sin is the medium by means of which God takes these human experiences up into himself in order there, in his own being as God, to bring an end to them. In putting it this way, I am suggesting that sin is not simply “paid for” but indeed destroyed.

…Barth’s doctrine of election also provides the answer to problems surrounding “incorporation” into Christ’s “story.” Given that human beings are elected “in Christ,” they do not have to be “engrafted” into him at a later point in time. They were already “in” Christ when he suffered, died, and was raised. The death that he dies to bring an end to the sinner is already our death in that it takes place in him. And the new creation effected by the verdict of the Father is already effective for them in advance of their own final resurrection.

©2014 by Mark W. Elliott, Scott J. Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick

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For more information on Galatians and Christian Theology, click here.