BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 11, 2015

Cover ArtDefending Substitution by Simon Gathercole, and 2 Corinthians by George Guthrie, were reviewed in the latest issue of Themelios.

“Guthrie has provided a benchmark commentary on 2 Corinthians. His work demonstrates excellent scholarship that is marked by humility as well as pastoral warmth and wisdom. Throughout this commentary Guthrie’s interpretive decisions are both judicious and persuasive….Should be an automatic inclusion into the library of anyone hoping to mine the wealth of this wonderful epistle.”

At Jesus Creed, RJS continued to reflect on J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Brandon Smith at Theology and Christian Life named A New Heaven and a New Earth as one of his 5 Favorite Books of 2015.

An Essential Guide to Interpersonal Communication, by Quentin Schultze and Diane Badzinski, was reviewed at Longing4Truth.

Cover ArtBooks at a Glance recommended the Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament, edited by G.K. Beale and D.A. Carson.

“It’s not often that you come across a book that genuinely deserves to be on every pastor’s shelf, but almost never can we say of a new book that it really ought to be on every pastor’s desk, ready at hand always for use in every sermon preparation. Beale and Carson’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament is without question such a book.”

Greg Peters, author of The Story of Monasticism, was interviewed at The Christian Humanist.

Charles Farhadian’s Introducing World Religions was reviewed at Sojo Theo.

Introducing World Religions is clear, stimulating, and bursting with useful information for readers of all backgrounds. It comes highly recommended.”

Hans Madueme, co-editor of Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, was interviewed by Fred Zaspel at Books at a Glance.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 14, 2015

Cover ArtIn the latest issue of Themelios, Christopher A. Beetham reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

“I strongly recommend this book. I agree with Donald Hagner, who, endorsing the book, wrote that ‘it could serve admirably as a basic textbook on biblical theology.’ Yes, and so much more. If every evangelical student from Anchorage to Addis Ababa would pick up and read, it could revolutionize global Christianity.”

Also in Themelios:

Gospel of Glory, by Richard Bauckham, was reviewed at Books at a Glance.

“Bauckham’s new monograph is probably the most important guide to selected Johannine themes and passages since Leon Morris’s Jesus is the Christ. A rich, up-to-date resource that no serious student will want to miss.”

Zen Hess, at Theology Forum, reviewed Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 10, 2015

Cover ArtKevin Brown, at Diglotting, reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by N. T. Wright, Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, and John Frederick.

Whether you are involved in biblical studies or theological studies, this volume will surely have something you can enjoy. It is a fantastic read for anyone interested in current issues swirling about regarding Galatians.

RBL featured two reviews of Acts of the Apostles by William Kurz, one from Thomas Phillips and the other from Troy Troftgruben.

At The Budding Exegete, Kenneth Litwak reviewed Donald Hagner’s The New Testament (part 1, part 2).

Andrew Spencer, at Ethics and Culture, reviewed Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation.

At Pursuing Veritas, Jacob J. Prahlow reviewed Encountering the New Testament by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough.

Sherif Gendy, at Arabish Biblical Theology, reviewed Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, edited by Hans Madueme and Michael Reeves.

Brandon Ambrosino quoted from John Caputo’s What Would Jesus Deconstruct? in the Boston Globe article Jesus’ Radical Politics.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 27, 2015

Cover ArtSamuel Wells, at The Christian Century, reviewed James K. A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Smith perceives the preponderance of American Christians as people bent on security, comfort, and autonomy….For such Christians, truth is equated with terms like absolute and objective, words that turn Christianity into a mechanism for achieving all-seeing impregnability. In order to preserve the power and privilege such a perspective is designed to secure, it’s necessary—at all costs—to hold on to representational notions of truth.

At Credo Magazine, Jeff Straub reviewed Why Study History? by John Fea (page 58).

Paul D. Adams, at In Christ, reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Always Have a Reason, J.W. Wartick shared a quote from Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, edited by Hans Madueme and Michael Reeves.

Keith Simon, at Every Square Inch, reflected on Bryan Litfin’s Early Christian Martyr Stories in light of the recent killing of 21 Coptic Christians.

The Gospel Coalition shared an excerpt from D. A. Carson’s Praying with Paul, and released a video promo about the Praying with Paul study curriculum and discussion guide.

 

New Release: Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin

Cover ArtThe Christian doctrines of original sin and the historical fall of Adam have been in retreat since the rise of modernity. Here leading scholars present a theological, biblical, and scientific case for the necessity of belief in original sin and the historicity of Adam and Eve in response to contemporary challenges.

Representing various Christian traditions, the contributors shed light on recent debates as they present the traditional doctrine of original sin as orthodox, evangelical, and the most theologically mature and cogent synthesis of the biblical witness. This fresh look at a heated topic in evangelical circles will appeal to professors, students, and readers interested in the creation-evolution debate.

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“This is a long-overdue book on a crucial flash point in evangelical faith and theology: the sin that dare not speak its name (‘original’)….I suspect it will become a popular textbook in a number of evangelical institutions.” – Kevin J. Vanhoozer, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

“Madueme and Reeves have brought together a clearly reasoned set of essays in a volume that seeks to shore up traditional, orthodox accounts of original sin. They do not shrink from the complex difficulties this doctrine raises for contemporary theological and scientific accounts of human origins. And even if readers disagree with specific conclusions the authors reach, they will still learn much from this fair-minded, conservative evangelical work.” – Oliver Crisp, Fuller Theological Seminary

“Sketches in how thoughtful Christians wrestle with contemporary scientific claims that rule out both a historical Adam and fall. The volume does not pretend to answer all the challenges, but for candor, faithfulness, and clarity on these topics, it holds pride of place.” – D. A. Carson, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

“A substantial basis for assurance that Adam really existed, that we fell in him, and that we can trust in Jesus to undo what Adam did.” – John Frame, Reformed Theological Seminary

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Hans Madueme (PhD, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is assistant professor of theological studies at Covenant College in Lookout Mountain, Georgia, and an adjunct professor at Trinity Graduate School, Trinity International University. He also serves as a book review editor for Themelios.

Michael Reeves (PhD, King’s College, London) is theologian-at-large at Wales Evangelical School of Theology. He previously served as head of theology for the Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship (UCCF) and is the author of several books, including Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith.

For more information on Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, click here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 7, 2014

Cover ArtIn the latest issue of Biblotheca Sacra, Glenn Kreider reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism, which he “highly recommended,” and Kreider also reviewed Imagining the Kingdom.

“This is an excellent book, a profound theological evaluation of worship. It should be required reading for every pastor or minister, especially those who lead worship.”

Jacob Prahlow, at Pursuing Veritas, reviewed The Church According to Paul by James Thompson.

Hans Madueme, coeditor of Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, was interviewed by Phillip Newman at Covenant College.

At KFUO, Andrew Root was interviewed about his new book Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Brett David Potter, at The Other Journal, reflected on Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life.

At ἐνθύμησις, Jacob Cerone began a series on Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

At Euangelion, Michael Bird announced Simon Gathercole’s forthcoming Defending Substitution.

Byron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, is excited to read God’s Wider Presence by Robert Johnston.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 11, 2014

Cover ArtAt The Tentative Apologist, Randal Rauser interviewed Peter Enns about Scripture, inerrancy, and his book Inspiration and Incarnation.

“[T]here is no better guide in the process of re-examination than Peter Enns, Professor of Biblical Studies at Eastern University. Beginning with the publication of his book Inspiration and Incarnation: Evangelicals and the Problem of the Old Testament, Professor Enns has emerged as a leading progressive evangelical voice, challenging conservative Christians everywhere to rethink what they’ve been taught about the Bible.”

Justin Taylor recommended the forthcoming Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, edited by Hans Madueme and Michael Reeves.

Douglas Connelly, at The Englewood Review of Books, reviewed Timothy Wengert’s Reading the Bible with Martin Luther.

Nate Claiborne began to engage with Who’s Afraid of Relativism? by James K. A. Smith

Constance Cherry, author of The Special Service Worship Architect, was interviewed at The Threshing Floor.

Robin Jensen  was interviewed by Anglican Review with Michael Porter about her book Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity.

Byron Borger recommended James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Larry Hurtado announced the release of Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite.