BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 11, 2015

Cover ArtDefending Substitution by Simon Gathercole, and 2 Corinthians by George Guthrie, were reviewed in the latest issue of Themelios.

“Guthrie has provided a benchmark commentary on 2 Corinthians. His work demonstrates excellent scholarship that is marked by humility as well as pastoral warmth and wisdom. Throughout this commentary Guthrie’s interpretive decisions are both judicious and persuasive….Should be an automatic inclusion into the library of anyone hoping to mine the wealth of this wonderful epistle.”

At Jesus Creed, RJS continued to reflect on J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Brandon Smith at Theology and Christian Life named A New Heaven and a New Earth as one of his 5 Favorite Books of 2015.

An Essential Guide to Interpersonal Communication, by Quentin Schultze and Diane Badzinski, was reviewed at Longing4Truth.

Cover ArtBooks at a Glance recommended the Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament, edited by G.K. Beale and D.A. Carson.

“It’s not often that you come across a book that genuinely deserves to be on every pastor’s shelf, but almost never can we say of a new book that it really ought to be on every pastor’s desk, ready at hand always for use in every sermon preparation. Beale and Carson’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament is without question such a book.”

Greg Peters, author of The Story of Monasticism, was interviewed at The Christian Humanist.

Charles Farhadian’s Introducing World Religions was reviewed at Sojo Theo.

Introducing World Religions is clear, stimulating, and bursting with useful information for readers of all backgrounds. It comes highly recommended.”

Hans Madueme, co-editor of Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, was interviewed by Fred Zaspel at Books at a Glance.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 17, 2015

Cover ArtBeginning Biblical Hebrew, by John Cook and Robert Holmstedt, was reviewed by Jesse Scheumann at Books at a Glance.

“I praise Cook and Holmstedt for producing a methodologically rigorous grammar that does many unique things to make Hebrew come alive for students. Surely, BBH will help the whole field take a step forward in more effectively teaching Hebrew to the next generation.”

Also at Books at a Glance, a helpful summary of G. K. Beale’s Handbook on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament.

Jennifer Guo reviewed Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution.

“An excellent introduction to some of the scholarly debate surrounding the atonement and provides a brief and accessible exegetical defense of substitutionary atonement through two Pauline texts. It’s a great book for laity with academic interest in soteriology as well as beginning Bible college or seminary students.”

This Strange and Sacred Scripture by Matthew Schlimm, and The Old Testament and Ethics, edited by Joel Green and Jacqueline Lapsely, were reviewed at Interpreting Scripture.

Lindsay Kennedy, at My Digital Seminary, reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

“The label ‘game changer’ should not be thrown around hastily, however I believe A New Heaven and a New Earth has the potential to be this very thing for many Christians today.”

Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament, by Stanley Porter, was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 1, 2015

Cover ArtThe Church according to Paul by James Thompson received the 2015 Book of the Year Award from the Academy of Parish Clergy.

We were in unanimous agreement that it is a great resource for working pastors. It is superlative of the best work coming out of biblical studies, because it is not written simply for the academy’s ivory tower but for the sake of the church.

Dave Hershey reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Jennifer Guo reviewed Reformed Catholicity by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

Spencer Robinson, at Spoiled Milks, reviewed Frank Thielman’s BECNT volume on Ephesians.

Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek and John Dobson’s Learn New Testament Greek were recommended at Credo Magazine.

Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea was reviewed by Blair Smith at Reformation 21.

Gloria Furman, at The Gospel Coalition, is reading The King in His Beauty by Tom Schreiner, Let the Nations Be Glad by John Piper, and A New Testament Biblical Theology by G. K. Beale.

D. A. Carson was interviewed on Point of View about his new book Praying with Paul, which Point of View also reviewed.

Rob Johnston, author of God’s Wider Presence, was invited to give a series of lectures on faith and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary. You can find the videos here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 31, 2014

Cover ArtScot McKnight, at Jesus Creed, continues his reflections on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“It may well be that the youth do have the right to protest against their elders. If that be the case, however, the authenticity of such protest will be demonstrated by youth’s willingness to maintain solidarity with the guilt of the church-community and to bear that burden in love, abiding in penitence before God’s word.”

At The Gospel Coalition, Grant Gaines reviewed For the Glory of God by Daniel Block.

The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, was reviewed by Miguel Echevarria at Books at a Glance, and recommended by Ed Stetzer in a Christianity Today article about Biblical literacy.

Eric McKiddie, at Pastoralized, recommended A New Testament Biblical Theology by G.K. Beale.

At Words on the Word, Abram K-J recommended Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

John Morehead reflected on the Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland and Gerald McDermott.

Bryan Litfin, author of Early Christian Martyr Stories, and Mark Noll, author of From Every Tribe and Nation, were each interviewed on The Janet Mefferd Show. You can listen to Litfin’s interview here, and Noll’s here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 18, 2014

Cover ArtThe Institute for Sacred Architecture reviewed The Space Between, by Eric Jacobsen.

“Jacobsen artfully weaves together the linear progression of the story of redemption, which starts in the Garden and ends in the Heavenly City, with our understanding of the urban environment. He states that in our place and time we are not yet in the Heavenly City; however, we can and should work toward it.”

G.K Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew, and Rolf Jacobson and Karl Jacobson’s Invitation to the Psalms were reviewed in the Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament.

Daniel Waldschmidt, at the Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary Blog, reviewed Galatians by Douglas Moo.

At Scriptorium Daily, Matt Jenson recommended the Turning South series; comprised of Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice, Susan VanZanten’s Reading a Different Story, and Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Jordon Stone recommended Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, at the Ordinary Ministry blog.

At Daily Theology, Krista Stevens reflected on The Gospel of Mark by Francis Moloney.

David Naugle listed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel, in the Cardus summer reading list.

The Logos Academic Blog interviewed Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, interviewed Christopher Hays, co-editor of Evangelicals and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, as part of his ongoing “Aha” Moments series.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 2, 2014

Cover ArtMichael Bird reviewed Stanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament.

“Porter is a recognized expert on biblical Greek, papyrology, and epigraphy, and therefore, this book reflects his wealth of knowledge in those areas ….[D]efinitely worth reading and to recommend to students.”

At Mundus Reconciliatus Ecclesia, Joshua Luper reflected on Jesus the Temple by Nicholas Perrin.

Stephanie Bliese recommended a number of Baker Academic titles in her Christian Theologian’s Reading List, including:

At Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, Nick Norelli reviewed the Logos edition of Craig Keener’s Acts commentary.

Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, by Thomas Guarino, was awarded the 2014 Paradosis Center Book Prize.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 04, 2013

Cover ArtNijay Gupta reviewed Lee McDonald’s The Story of Jesus in History and Faith, at Crux Sola.

“McDonald represents a view that tries to see faith and history as complementary (not contradictory), and that something is missing when you eliminate one. In terms of history, McDonald urges: ‘Faith in Jesus as the Christ is faith in a historical phenomenon in the sense that Christian faith is centered on God’s activity in a historical person who lived and died in Palestine in the first century’ (p. 21). On the other hand, ‘Faith…realizes that appropriation of God’s activity in Jesus cannot be found in the historical-critical dimension, but through faith alone’ (p. 21)…..I warmly recommend this to teachers and students as a ‘faith-friendly’ guide to studying the historical Jesus!”

Also, Nijay shared an excerpt from Donald Hagner’s The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction, for his post on the Purpose of Matthew.

Matthew Montonini shared his experience attending the Mullen Lecture recently delivered by Francis Moloney at St. Mary’s Seminary. Moloney’s topic was “Love in the Gospel of John: to What End?” based on his book Love in the Gospel of John.

Jesus Among Friends and Enemies, edited by Chris Keith and Larry Hurtado, was included in Brian LePort’s list of resources for studying John the Baptist.

Perry Oakes reviewed Gary Long’s Grammatical Concepts 101 for Biblical Hebrew, for RBL.

Dave, at Can’t Catch My Breath, shared from Eddie Gibbs’ The Rebirth of the Church.

J. Todd Billings’ Union with Christ, G.K. Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, and Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching, were recommended in Derek Rishmawy’s Reformedish Seminary Starter Kit.

Michael Kruger, at The Gospel Coalition, included Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics: Prolegomena in his Top 10 Books on the Bible’s Authority.

Englewood Review of Books featured Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, by  Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umble in their new release update.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 16, 2013

Cover ArtConrade Yap reviewed Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics on his blog, Panorama of a Book Saint.

“Penner weaves in the perspectives of Alistair MacIntyre, Soren Kierkergaard, and to some extent, John G Stackhouse, and slowly builds up his case to argue for a new form of Apologetics. This form will be a shift away from epistemological paradigms toward a hermeneutics of faith.”

Jonathan Pennington, author of Reading the Gospels Wisley, addressed the question What Is the Unforgivable Sin?

In the latest issue of Themelios, Christopher Beetham reviewed Markus Bockmuehl’s Simon Peter in Scripture and Memory.

David Horrell reviewed Moral Formation According to Paul by James Thompson, and Stephen Moyise reviewed G.K. Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, both for RBL.

Bob Trube reviewed Inspiration and Incarnation, and The Evolution of Adam, by Peter Enns.

At The Reformed Register, Don Haflich reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Josh Hayes reviewed Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty for the Southern Resources Blog.

Baker Academic Library: Acts 2:1-4

Acts 2:1-4 (NIV):
When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.

Craig Keener, Acts Vol. 1, pp. 793-94:

Yet Luke reports the Pentecost experience not merely as a matter of historical interest but because for him it set the normative pattern for the church. THis is not to say that all the phenomena of Pentecost would be repeated on subsequent occasions (he never reports the wind or fire again) but to contend that, for Luke, the church’s experiences was (or should be) pervasively charismatic; as Richard Hays puts it, it was to be not so much an expression of “early catholicism” as of “early pentecostalism” [Hays, Moral Vision, 135].

The Pentecost experience is repeated (Acts 4:31-35), including beyond Jerusalem for other groups (8:15-17; 10:44-47; 19:6), suggesting that it is paradigmatic. As Luke repeats the Cornelius story and Paul’s conversion each three times, emphasizing key turning points for the Gentile mission, he repeats glossolalia (a sign useful for Luke’s emphasis on cross-cultural speech, 1:8) three times (2:4; 10:46; 19:6). But whereas the other repetitions allude back to a key event, the repetition of this sign from the Pentecost narrative evokes that narrative through a repeated experience. Luke thus treats the Pentecost experience as paradigmatic (as in 2:38-39).

G.K. Beale, A New Testament Biblical Theology, pp. 594-95:

The appearance of “tongues of fire” (Acts 2:3) is an expression of the coming Spirit that reflects a theophany. But more can be said: it appears to be a theophany associated with the descending divine presence of the heavenly temple. A number of considerations point to this.

The report that “there came from heaven a noise like a violent rushing wind” (Acts 2:2), and that there appeared “tongues of fire” calls to mind the typical theophanies of the OT. God appeared in these theophanies with thunderous noise and in the form of fire. The first great theophany of the OT was at Sinai, where “God descended on it in fire” and appeared in the midst of loud “voices and torches and a thick cloud” and “fire”. Sinai was the model theophany for most later similar divine appearances in the OT, and to some degree God’s coming at Sinai stands in the background of the Spirit’s coming at Pentecost.

Mikeal Parsons, Acts (PAIDEIA), pp. 37 -38:

What is the nature of the miracle recorded here in Acts 2:1-4? The coming of the Spirit is joined by two manifestations: a noise in the sky, like a strong blowing wind (2:2), and divided tongues (that looked) like fire (2:3). In describing the event as accompanied by these natural phenomena, Luke is echoing the theophany scenes of the OT, in which God’s presence is accompanied by similiar signs (Exod 19:16; Judg 5:4-5; cf. Ps 18:7-15; 29:3-9).

Luke is also using the rhetorical strategy of ekphrasis, that is, employing language that appeals as much to the eye as to the ear. Theon defines ekphrasis as “bringing what is portrayed clearly before the sight.” What is portrayed could be “of persons and events and places and periods of time” (Prog. 118, trans. Kennedy 2003, 45). An ekphrasis of an event could include a description of “war, peace, a storm, famine, plague, an earthquake” (Prog. 118, trans. Kennedy 2003, 45) […] The function of ekphrasis or ekphrastic language in a narrative is often to draw attention to the significance of the even thus described for the overarching argument of the narrative (Krieger 1992, 7). Such is certainly the case with the use of ekphrastic language in Luke and Acts, in which vivid language is used at key moments in the life of Jesus. […] The ekphrastic language in the Pentecost scene underscores the continuity between the founder of the “Way” and his followers. Significant events in Jesus’ life and ministry were depicted in language that appealed to the eye more than the ear. The beginning of the disciples’ “public ministry” described in similarly vivid language, marking the disciples’ reception of the Holy Spirit.

Darrell Bock, Acts (BECNT), p. 99:

These disciples begin to speak in ἑτέραις γλώσσαις (heterais glossais), which refers to other languages, as verse 8 makes clear. In the OT, the expression appears in Isa. 28:11 LXX in the singular. This one-step understanding differs from the description in 1 Corinthians, where two steps (utterance and interpretation) are required for understanding. In Acts this speaking of tongues in foreign languages is done as the Spirit gives them utterance (so also Jervell 1998: 133-34). The term for “utterance” (ἀποφθέγγεσθαι, apophthengesthai) is relatively rare, appearing only three times in the NT, all in Acts (2:4, 14; 26:25), and six times in the LXX (BDAG 125; 1 Chron. 25:1 [positively of prophecy]; Ps. 58:8 [59:7 Eng.]; Mic. 5:11 [5:12 Eng.]; Zech. 10:2; Ezek. 13:9, 19; five of these six uses are negative, of lies or false prophets). Peter will explain in verses 17-18 that all have received the pouring out of the Spirit as an indication of the arrival of God’s promised new era (see also Luke 3:15-17, where the Spirit’s coming points to the presence of the Messiah, another point Peter makes in Acts 2:36).

Video: G. K. Beale on the Handbook on the NT Use of the OT

Why Attend to the Use of the OT in the New:

How Pastors Can Use the Handbook:

How Students and Professors Can Use the Handbook:

Beale’s Nine-Step Approach to Interpreting Use of the OT in the NT:

Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology 1 Year Later:

About the Book:

This concise guide by a leading New Testament scholar helps readers understand how to better study the multitude of Old Testament references in the New Testament. G. K. Beale focuses on the “how to” of interpreting the New Testament use of the Old Testament, providing students and pastors with many of the insights and categories necessary for them to do their own exegesis. Brief enough to be accessible yet thorough enough to be useful, this handbook will be a trusted guide for all students of the Bible.

“During the last four decades, not a little serious work has been undertaken to understand better how the New Testament cites the Old. Quite a lot of it was written by Greg Beale. Here, however, he keeps the student in mind and provides an introduction to the subject, complete with helpful bibliographies, useful illustrations, and step-by-step demonstrations of how to think through these issues.”–D. A. Carson, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

For more information on the Handbook on the NT Use of the OT, click here.