BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 10, 2015

Cover ArtKevin Brown, at Diglotting, reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by N. T. Wright, Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, and John Frederick.

Whether you are involved in biblical studies or theological studies, this volume will surely have something you can enjoy. It is a fantastic read for anyone interested in current issues swirling about regarding Galatians.

RBL featured two reviews of Acts of the Apostles by William Kurz, one from Thomas Phillips and the other from Troy Troftgruben.

At The Budding Exegete, Kenneth Litwak reviewed Donald Hagner’s The New Testament (part 1, part 2).

Andrew Spencer, at Ethics and Culture, reviewed Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation.

At Pursuing Veritas, Jacob J. Prahlow reviewed Encountering the New Testament by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough.

Sherif Gendy, at Arabish Biblical Theology, reviewed Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, edited by Hans Madueme and Michael Reeves.

Brandon Ambrosino quoted from John Caputo’s What Would Jesus Deconstruct? in the Boston Globe article Jesus’ Radical Politics.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 2, 2014

Cover ArtMichael Bird reviewed Stanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament.

“Porter is a recognized expert on biblical Greek, papyrology, and epigraphy, and therefore, this book reflects his wealth of knowledge in those areas ….[D]efinitely worth reading and to recommend to students.”

At Mundus Reconciliatus Ecclesia, Joshua Luper reflected on Jesus the Temple by Nicholas Perrin.

Stephanie Bliese recommended a number of Baker Academic titles in her Christian Theologian’s Reading List, including:

At Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, Nick Norelli reviewed the Logos edition of Craig Keener’s Acts commentary.

Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, by Thomas Guarino, was awarded the 2014 Paradosis Center Book Prize.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 28, 2014

Cover ArtAt The Englewood Review of Books, Tim Høiland reviewed Reading a Different Story by Susan VanZanten.

“Ultimately, VanZanten is an apologist for ‘Christian cosmopolitanism.’ She wants believers’ allegiances to transcend geopolitical borders. Specifically, she wants us to read widely and well in order to better love God and to love our neighbors, both near and far. While she specifically appeals to her colleagues in academia, the principle applies to the rest of us just as well.”

J. Ryan Parker, at Pop Theology, reviewed Personal Jesus by Clive Marsh and Vaughn Roberts.

Thomas Schreiner’s  The King in His Beauty was reviewed by Lindsay Kennedy at My Digital Seminary.

Chris Kiesling, co-author with David Setran of Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, wrote the article “Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood: Christian Formation and Discipleship” for Catalyst.

Nijay Gupta reflected on a quote about simplicity and complexity from Donald Hagner’s The New Testament.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 14, 2014

Cover ArtIn honor of the recently released seventh edition of D. A. Carson’s New Testament Commentary Survey, Matt Smethurst at The Gospel Coalition interviewed Carson about what makes a good commentary.

“Good all-round commentaries help readers think their way through the text—which requires adequate handling of words, sentences, flow of thought, genre, theological presuppositions, knowledge of historical setting, and, ideally, a commentary writer who is humble and of a contrite spirit and who trembles at God’s Word. But most commentaries do not do all these things (and other things—e.g., interaction with some other commentaries) equally well. That is one of the reasons one is usually wise to consult at least two or three commentaries with different emphases.”

At The Jesus Blog, Anthony Le Donne briefly reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Also reviewing Levering’s The Theology of Augustine was Nate Claiborne.

Jennifer Guo, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed R. Michael Allen’s Justification and the Gospel.

Moschos Goutzioudis reviewed The New Testament by Donald A. Hagner, for RBL.

At Raw Christianity, David Gunner Gundersen reviewed The Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations by Michael Holmes.

The Christian Century reviewed Reading a Different Story, by Susan VanZanten.

Steve Bishop, at An Accidental Blog, reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, and interviewed James Skillen about his forthcoming book The Good of Politics.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 10, 2014

Dr. David Gowler started A Chorus of Voices, a blog which chronicles his writing of a forthcoming book on the reception history of the parables.

“[T]he “meaning” of the parables does not reside alone in the creative genius of Jesus and/or the Gospel authors; it exists in a relation between creator and contemplators. We stand, therefore, on the shoulders of centuries of conversations; our own interpretations are never independent of the reception history of these parables”

Cover ArtNijay Gupta listed Donald Hagner’s The New Testament, and Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology, as two of the Best Biblical Studies Books of 2013.

Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood by David Setran and Chris Kiesling, and Imagining the Kingdom by James K.A. Smith, made the College Transition Initiative’s Top 10 Books of 2013.

The Aqueduct Project interviewed Jonathan Pennington about his book Reading the Gospels Wisely.

Bob Trube at the InterVarsity Emerging Scholars blog reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom here, and Imagining the Kingdom here.

Larry Hurtado discussed The Apostolic Fathers ed. Michael W. Holmes, and Clayton N. Jefford’s Reading the Apostolic Fathers, in a post about publications on the Apostolic Fathers.

At Servants of Grace, Dave Jenkins reviewed The King In His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner.

Daniel Siedell’s God in the Gallery inspired Derek Rishmawy’s theological reflection on the modern art collection at LACMA.

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Through Thursday, January 16, the eBook of Steven Mathewson’s The Art of Preaching Old Testament Narrative is available for $3.99 (84% off) at participating retailers, including:

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BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 04, 2013

Cover ArtNijay Gupta reviewed Lee McDonald’s The Story of Jesus in History and Faith, at Crux Sola.

“McDonald represents a view that tries to see faith and history as complementary (not contradictory), and that something is missing when you eliminate one. In terms of history, McDonald urges: ‘Faith in Jesus as the Christ is faith in a historical phenomenon in the sense that Christian faith is centered on God’s activity in a historical person who lived and died in Palestine in the first century’ (p. 21). On the other hand, ‘Faith…realizes that appropriation of God’s activity in Jesus cannot be found in the historical-critical dimension, but through faith alone’ (p. 21)…..I warmly recommend this to teachers and students as a ‘faith-friendly’ guide to studying the historical Jesus!”

Also, Nijay shared an excerpt from Donald Hagner’s The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction, for his post on the Purpose of Matthew.

Matthew Montonini shared his experience attending the Mullen Lecture recently delivered by Francis Moloney at St. Mary’s Seminary. Moloney’s topic was “Love in the Gospel of John: to What End?” based on his book Love in the Gospel of John.

Jesus Among Friends and Enemies, edited by Chris Keith and Larry Hurtado, was included in Brian LePort’s list of resources for studying John the Baptist.

Perry Oakes reviewed Gary Long’s Grammatical Concepts 101 for Biblical Hebrew, for RBL.

Dave, at Can’t Catch My Breath, shared from Eddie Gibbs’ The Rebirth of the Church.

J. Todd Billings’ Union with Christ, G.K. Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, and Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching, were recommended in Derek Rishmawy’s Reformedish Seminary Starter Kit.

Michael Kruger, at The Gospel Coalition, included Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics: Prolegomena in his Top 10 Books on the Bible’s Authority.

Englewood Review of Books featured Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, by  Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umble in their new release update.

Don Hagner’s “Ten Guidelines for Evangelical Scholarship”

Ten Guidelines for Evangelical Scholarship
by Donald A. Hagner

Proposals for an evangelical criticism that affirms the indispensability of the critical method, i.e., being  “reasonably”  critical:

We must:

1. See what is there (avoiding maximal conservatism, anachronistic approaches, harmonizing and homogenizing, partial appeals to historical evidence).

2. Affirm the full humanity of the scriptures (the word of God in the words of men).

3. Define the nature of inspiration inductively (not deductively), i.e., in light of the phenomena of scripture (doing justice to it as it is).

4. Acknowledge that no presuppositionless position is possible and that the best we can do is attempt to step outside of our presuppositions and imagine “what if.” (Only a relative degree of objectivity is attainable.)

5. Modify the classical historical-critical method so far as its presuppositions are concerned, i.e., so as to allow openness to the transcendent, the action of God in the historical process, the possibility of miracles, etc. Develop a method not alien but rather appropriate to what is being studied.

6. Maintain a unified worldview, avoiding a schizophrenic attitude toward truth and criteria for the validation of truth. That is, all truth is God’s truth, including that arrived at through our rationality.

7. Acknowledge that in the realm of historical knowledge, we are not dealing with matters that can be proven (or disproven, for that matter!), but with probability. Historical knowledge remains dependent on inferences from the evidence. Good historical criticism is what makes best sense, i.e., the most coherent explanation of the evidence.

8. Avoid the extremes of a pure fideism and a pure rationality-based apologetics. Blind faith is as inappropriate as rationalism. Faith and reason, however, both have their proper place. What is needed is a creative synthesis.

9. Develop humility, in contrast to the strange (and unwarranted!) confidence and arrogance of critical orthodoxy (concerning constructs that depend on presuppositions alien to the documents themselves).

10. Approach criticism by developing a creative tension between intellectual honestly and faithfulness to the tradition (each side needs constant reexamination), with the trust that criticism rightly engaged will ultimately vindicate rather than destroy Christian truth.

Note: The Holy Spirit cannot be appealed to in order to solve historical-critical issues or in the issue of truth-claims. Nevertheless, it is true that for the believer the inner witness of the Spirit confirms the truth of the faith existentially or in the heart.

Concede: Our knowledge is fragmentary and partial, and all our wisdom is but stammering. Full understanding can only come after our perfection, and then it will no longer be understanding alone but also worship.

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Donald A. Hagner (PhD, University of Manchester) is George Eldon Ladd Professor Emeritus of New Testament and senior professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He is the author of Encountering the Book of Hebrews, The Jewish Reclamation of Jesus, New Testament Exegesis and Research: A Guide for Seminarians, and commentaries on Matthew and Hebrews. He is also coeditor of the New International Greek Testament Commentary and an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Video: Donald Hagner discusses The New Testament

Approaching The New Testament through salvation history

Faith, Criticism, and Certitude in The New Testament

About the book

This substantial introduction explores the origin and character of the New Testament writings. Donald Hagner deals with the New Testament both historically and theologically, employing the framework of salvation history. He treats the New Testament as a coherent body of texts and stresses the unity of the New Testament without neglecting its variety. Although the volume covers typical questions of introduction–such as author, date, background, and sources–it focuses primarily on understanding the theological content and meaning of the texts.

“This is not just another ‘who wrote, to whom, where, and why’ introduction to the New Testament. It is as comprehensive a study of the New Testament writings in the context of Christianity’s beginnings as one could wish for in a single volume, including astonishingly full and helpful bibliographies. Don Hagner’s The New Testament is a showpiece of high-quality evangelical scholarship.”-James D. G. Dunn

For more information on The New Testament, click here.