BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 6, 2016

Cover ArtMichael Allen and Scott Swain, as editors of Zondervan’s Common Places blog, interviewed James K. A. Smith about his Cultural Liturgies series.

“I’m not suggesting we need less thinking; my point is that we need more than thinking. And we need to think carefully about the limits of thought (I tried to tease this out in the opening of Imagining, with a hat tip to Proust). That’s not a paradox; that’s intellectual honesty.”

Defending Substitution by Simon Gathercole, and Galatians by Peter Oakes, appeared in the latest Regent’s Review.

On Up For Debate! Myron Bradley Penner, author of The End of Apologetics, discussed his arguments against apologetics with William Lane Craig.

Matthew Schlimm was interviewed at On Script about his recent book, This Strange and Sacred Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 22, 2016

Cover ArtNorman Wirzba’s From Nature to Creation was reviewed at Theology Forum.

In From Nature to Creation, Wirzba invites the reader to develop “an imagination for the world as created, sustained, and daily loved by God” (3). Few Christians would argue that we ought not to have such an imagination — nearly all Christians confess such a belief. So, the problem is, then, living as if that is true.

In case you missed it, Gracy Olmstead reviewed From Nature to Creation for Christianity Today.

At Jesus Creed, RJS examined J. Richard Middleton’s discussion of judgment and apocalyptic literature in A New Heaven and a New Earth.

9Marks reviewed Defending Substitution, by Simon Gathercole.

The Pastor as Public Theologian, by Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan was featured in Hearts & Minds Bookstore’s Best Books of 2015 – Part One, and From Nature to Creation by Norman Wirzba was featured in Part Two.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 11, 2015

Cover ArtDefending Substitution by Simon Gathercole, and 2 Corinthians by George Guthrie, were reviewed in the latest issue of Themelios.

“Guthrie has provided a benchmark commentary on 2 Corinthians. His work demonstrates excellent scholarship that is marked by humility as well as pastoral warmth and wisdom. Throughout this commentary Guthrie’s interpretive decisions are both judicious and persuasive….Should be an automatic inclusion into the library of anyone hoping to mine the wealth of this wonderful epistle.”

At Jesus Creed, RJS continued to reflect on J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Brandon Smith at Theology and Christian Life named A New Heaven and a New Earth as one of his 5 Favorite Books of 2015.

An Essential Guide to Interpersonal Communication, by Quentin Schultze and Diane Badzinski, was reviewed at Longing4Truth.

Cover ArtBooks at a Glance recommended the Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament, edited by G.K. Beale and D.A. Carson.

“It’s not often that you come across a book that genuinely deserves to be on every pastor’s shelf, but almost never can we say of a new book that it really ought to be on every pastor’s desk, ready at hand always for use in every sermon preparation. Beale and Carson’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament is without question such a book.”

Greg Peters, author of The Story of Monasticism, was interviewed at The Christian Humanist.

Charles Farhadian’s Introducing World Religions was reviewed at Sojo Theo.

Introducing World Religions is clear, stimulating, and bursting with useful information for readers of all backgrounds. It comes highly recommended.”

Hans Madueme, co-editor of Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, was interviewed by Fred Zaspel at Books at a Glance.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 30, 2015

Cover ArtAt Syndicate Theology you can read reflections on Jesus against the Scribal Elite from Dagmar Winter, Tobias Hägerland, Christopher Skinner, and Jason Lamoreaux, along with responses from Chris Keith.

“Chris Keith’s book, Jesus against the Scribal Elite, defends the claim that two factors are intimately related, namely a) Jesus’ status as an illiterate teacher and b) his conflict with scribal authorities. This is to say that conflict arose between Jesus and the scribal elite because of “how various groups within Second Temple Judaism would have perceived Jesus, a scribal-illiterate carpenter, upon his occasionally occupying the position of a scribal-literate authority” (155).”

Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution was reviewed by D. A. Carson at Reformation 21.

At Ponderings on a Faith Journey, Robert Cornwall reviewed From Nature to Creation by Norman Wirzba.

David Wilhite’s The Gospel according to Heretics was reviewed at Tabletalk Theology and recommended by Erik Raymond at The Gospel Coalition.

The Christian Humanist interviewed Kevin Vanhoozer about The Pastor as Public Theologian.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 25, 2015

Cover ArtThe Pastor as Public Theologian, By Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan, was reviewed by Dave Jenkins at Servants of Grace.

“This is an excellent book, one that should be read by Bible college and seminary students preparing for ministry. This book would also be good for new pastors to read to learn more about the work they’ve been entrusted with. I highly recommend this book and believe it will help new and seasoned pastors to learn more about the important conversation that is occurring about pastor ministry and how it is a theological office.”

The Pastor as Public Theologian was also reviewed by Andrew Spencer at Ethics and Culture.

Matthew Schlimm’s This Strange and Sacred Scripture was reviewed at The Presbyterian Outlook.

Bob on Books reviewed Defending Substitution by Simon Gathercole.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 11, 2015

Cover ArtAt The Gospel Coalition, Justin Taylor shared Kevin Vanhoozer’s 55 Theses on Pastors as Public Theologians from The Pastor as Public Theologian.

“Why does the church need pastor-theologians? What are pastor-theologians for? Our answer, in brief, is that pastor-theologians are gifts from the risen Christ, helps in building Christ’s church, especially by leading people to confess, comprehend, celebrate, communicate, commend to others, and conform themselves to what is in Christ.”

At The Jesus Blog, Anthony Le Donne recommended Jesus among Friends and Enemies, edited by Chris Keith and Larry Hurtado.

Cover ArtStanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament was reviewed by Jacob Prahlow at Pursuing Veritas.

“Highly recommended to anyone interested in learning more about the history of the New Testament. Not only do the contents of this book offer valuable observations for those seeking to better understand the New Testament and early Christianity, but How We Got the New Testament also addresses penetrating issues at the heart of all Christian faith.”

Mike Boling, at Servants of Grace, reviewed Defending Substitution by Simon Gathercole.

Alvin Rapien, at The Poor in Spirit, reviewed Christian Scharen’s Fieldwork in Theology.

Fieldwork in Theology will hopefully influence many to rethink their approach to research, society, and individuals around them.”

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 7, 2015

Cover ArtAt First Things, Peter Leithart reflected on the idea of “public theology” after reading Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan’s The Pastor as Public Theologian.

“The pastor’s task is always a public one, since it always has to do with helping a congregation ‘to become what they are called to be.’

This is indeed, as Vanhoozer claims, a ‘more excellent way’ of conceiving of and doing public theology.”

The Pastor as Public Theologian was reviewed at Veritas et Lux and Ordinary Ministry.

Michael, at Intelmin Apologetics, reviewed Defending Substitution by Simon Gathercole.

Tom Rainer included D.A. Carson’s Exegetical Fallacies, Millard Erickson’s Christian Theology, John Piper’s Let the Nations Be Glad, and Thomas Schreiner’s BECNT volume on Romans in his post What If I Could Only Have 25 Books in My Minister’s Library?

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 31, 2015

Cover ArtSimon Gathercole, author of Defending Substitution, was interviewed at Reformed Report.

“There are two key places in the Gospel narrative where Jesus describes his death as a substitutionary atonement. The first is Mark 10.45: ‘For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.’ This is a key statement because it is Jesus summing up his whole earthly mission. The second is Mark 14.22-24 where Jesus says: ‘this is my blood of the covenant which is poured out for many.’ Again, this is Jesus’ summary of the purpose of his death the night before he died, and this then became one of the most memorable statements of Jesus.”

Revelation, Peter Williamson’s latest addition to the acclaimed Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture, was reviewed by Timothy at Catholic Bibles.

“In the past when I was asked to recommend one particular commentary on Revelation, I would usually recommend at least two.  This was due to my desire to offer something that touched both the scholarly and pastoral elements of this book. Now, I will simply be encouraging people to get Peter Williamson’s Revelation.”

Finally, Bishop-elect Robert Barron recently spoke at Baker Book House, drawing from Exploring Catholic Theology.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 24, 2015

Cover ArtAt The Jesus Blog, Chris Keith shared two recent reviews of his Jesus against the Scribal Elite as well as the latest news about a symposium interacting with his book.

“Keith begins with the sources as they are, and explains the conflicting memories regarding Jesus’ scribal literacy from the fact that a scribal-illiterate member of the manual-labour class presumed to function as an authoritative teacher. Keith argues persuasively that this in itself would have been sufficient to lead to all sorts of questions and conclusions about his scribal-literacy and authority, and to bring him into direct conflict with the scribal elite.”

Lindsay Kennedy, at My Digital Seminary, reviewed Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution.

At Thoughts, Prayers & Songs, James reviewed Reading Barth with Charity by George Hunsinger.

“An important scholarly book for clarifying Barth’s theology. No doubt the revisionists named by Hunsinger will make a response which will further the debate.”

Matthew Schlimm’s This Strange and Sacred Scripture was reviewed at Brave Daily.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 17, 2015

Cover ArtBeginning Biblical Hebrew, by John Cook and Robert Holmstedt, was reviewed by Jesse Scheumann at Books at a Glance.

“I praise Cook and Holmstedt for producing a methodologically rigorous grammar that does many unique things to make Hebrew come alive for students. Surely, BBH will help the whole field take a step forward in more effectively teaching Hebrew to the next generation.”

Also at Books at a Glance, a helpful summary of G. K. Beale’s Handbook on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament.

Jennifer Guo reviewed Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution.

“An excellent introduction to some of the scholarly debate surrounding the atonement and provides a brief and accessible exegetical defense of substitutionary atonement through two Pauline texts. It’s a great book for laity with academic interest in soteriology as well as beginning Bible college or seminary students.”

This Strange and Sacred Scripture by Matthew Schlimm, and The Old Testament and Ethics, edited by Joel Green and Jacqueline Lapsely, were reviewed at Interpreting Scripture.

Lindsay Kennedy, at My Digital Seminary, reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

“The label ‘game changer’ should not be thrown around hastily, however I believe A New Heaven and a New Earth has the potential to be this very thing for many Christians today.”

Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament, by Stanley Porter, was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.