BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 20, 2014

Cover ArtAt RBL, John J. Pilch reviewed The World of the New Testament, edited by Joel Green and Lee McDonald.

“This is an excellent resource that in general succeeds in its aim to provide information about the cultural, social, and political contexts of the New Testament. Though the perspective is intentionally and explicitly evangelical, the contributors present the complexity of their particular issues frankly and honestly.”

In World Magazine, Makoto Fujimura recommended Daniel Siedell’s God in the Gallery, and David Greusel recommended The Space Between by Eric Jacobsen.

Kirk Miller shared a quote about the right and wrong ways to use a commentary, from Tremper Longman’s Old Testament Commentary Survey.

Darrell Bock, author of Jesus According to Scripture, was interviewed by Books at a Glance.

Markus Bockmuehl, author of Simon Peter in Scripture and Memory, has been appointed as the Dean Ireland’s Professor of the Exegesis of Holy Scripture at Keble College, Oxford.

A number of Baker Publishing titles were proclaimed winners of the 2014 Word Awards, including:

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 15, 2014

Cover ArtAt Acts and More, Steve Walton reviewed Jesus against the Scribal Elite, by Chris Keith.

“If Professor Chris Keith is substantially right (and I am persuaded that he is), there is an important factor to add into our reconstructions of why Jesus was opposed by the educated Jewish elite, and that is that he acted and spoke in ways which challenged their exclusive hold on the right to teach and, especially, to interpret Scripture.”

RJS, at Jesus Creed, has been reflecting on J. Richard Middleton’s The Liberating Image in the posts No Text is an Island, and The Artistry of Creation, Cosmic Temple, and Imago Dei.

Conrade Yap reviewed Models for Biblical Preaching, edited by Haddon Robinson and Patricia Batten.

At the ACT3 Network John Armstrong discussed Mark Noll and Carolyn Nystrom’s Is the Reformation Over?

Byron Borger, at Hearts & Minds, recommended Liberating Tradition by Kristina LaCelle-Peterson.

Kevin DeYoung recommended Darrell Bock’s BECNT volume on Acts, and Craig Keener’s multi-volume commentary on Acts.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 7, 2014

Cover ArtTony Campolo reflected on The Early Church on Killing, by Ron Sider.

“The book of Hebrews reminds us that we are ‘surrounded with a great crowd of witnesses’ to which we must be responsible in all that we do, but especially in our interpretations of the Holy Writ. As Ron Sider makes his case against Christians participating in war, supporting capital punishment, or justifying abortion, he supports his beliefs by resorting to the writings of some of the earliest Church leaders, and thus, takes Church tradition seriously.”

At Euangelion, Michael Bird reviewed Craig Keener’s Acts, Volume 2.

Joseph Sherrard, at Transpositions, reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Tim Challies recommended Grant Osborne’s Revelation volume in the BECNT series.

Rod Whitacre’s Patristic Greek Reader was recommended by Ben Witherington.

At The Anxious Bench, David Swartz reflected on Why Study History? by John Fea.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Abram K-J, at Words on the Word, reviewed Steve Moyise’s Jesus and Scripture.

At The Christian Manifesto, Calvin Moore reviewed The End of Apologetics by Myron Penner.

Phil Long reviewed Darrell Bock’s Jesus according to Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 11, 2013

Cover ArtAt Christianity Today, David Neff recently spoke with Ron Sider about his recent book, The Early Church on Killing, in an interview titled “Were the Church Fathers Consistently Pro-Life?

Why should we care what the writers of those first three centuries say?

I don’t think that what the early church in the first few centuries said and did is the final norm for Christians today. Our decisive norm is biblical revelation. Nevertheless, I think we need to take seriously what the Christians in the first three centuries thought Jesus was saying. They were much closer to him in time than we are, and there is reason to think they would have had a pretty good understanding of what he meant. Therefore, given that every single Christian text we have on killing from the first three centuries, whether war, capital punishment, or abortion, says that Christians don’t do that, and with some frequency they say that’s because of what Jesus said and did, I think Christians today ought to listen to them with some seriousness.

Also at CT, Neff interacted with Sider’s The Early Church on Killing in his article “Why Don’t We Find Bloodshed Repugnant Anymore?”

Doug Moo was interviewed about writing his new Galatians commentary by Lindsay Kennedy at My Digital Seminary.

The Christian Century’sTake & Read” recommendations for New Testament books included Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, by Warren Carter, A Peaceable Hope, by David Neville, and the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi.

Rick Wadholm Jr. at the I Heart Barth blog recommended Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

At Words on the Word, Abram K-J studied Luke 17 with the help of Darrell Bock’s BECNT volumes.

Jim Kane reviewed Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

Heath Henwood reviewed Rebirth of the Church, by Eddie Gibbs.

At The Anxious Bench, Miles Mullin reviewed Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity, by Robin Jensen.

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eBook Specials

Today only, Friday October 11, the Commentary on Romans eBook by Robert Gundry is available free at participating retailers. Learn more here.

Baker Academic Library: Acts 2:1-4

Acts 2:1-4 (NIV):
When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.

Craig Keener, Acts Vol. 1, pp. 793-94:

Yet Luke reports the Pentecost experience not merely as a matter of historical interest but because for him it set the normative pattern for the church. THis is not to say that all the phenomena of Pentecost would be repeated on subsequent occasions (he never reports the wind or fire again) but to contend that, for Luke, the church’s experiences was (or should be) pervasively charismatic; as Richard Hays puts it, it was to be not so much an expression of “early catholicism” as of “early pentecostalism” [Hays, Moral Vision, 135].

The Pentecost experience is repeated (Acts 4:31-35), including beyond Jerusalem for other groups (8:15-17; 10:44-47; 19:6), suggesting that it is paradigmatic. As Luke repeats the Cornelius story and Paul’s conversion each three times, emphasizing key turning points for the Gentile mission, he repeats glossolalia (a sign useful for Luke’s emphasis on cross-cultural speech, 1:8) three times (2:4; 10:46; 19:6). But whereas the other repetitions allude back to a key event, the repetition of this sign from the Pentecost narrative evokes that narrative through a repeated experience. Luke thus treats the Pentecost experience as paradigmatic (as in 2:38-39).

G.K. Beale, A New Testament Biblical Theology, pp. 594-95:

The appearance of “tongues of fire” (Acts 2:3) is an expression of the coming Spirit that reflects a theophany. But more can be said: it appears to be a theophany associated with the descending divine presence of the heavenly temple. A number of considerations point to this.

The report that “there came from heaven a noise like a violent rushing wind” (Acts 2:2), and that there appeared “tongues of fire” calls to mind the typical theophanies of the OT. God appeared in these theophanies with thunderous noise and in the form of fire. The first great theophany of the OT was at Sinai, where “God descended on it in fire” and appeared in the midst of loud “voices and torches and a thick cloud” and “fire”. Sinai was the model theophany for most later similar divine appearances in the OT, and to some degree God’s coming at Sinai stands in the background of the Spirit’s coming at Pentecost.

Mikeal Parsons, Acts (PAIDEIA), pp. 37 -38:

What is the nature of the miracle recorded here in Acts 2:1-4? The coming of the Spirit is joined by two manifestations: a noise in the sky, like a strong blowing wind (2:2), and divided tongues (that looked) like fire (2:3). In describing the event as accompanied by these natural phenomena, Luke is echoing the theophany scenes of the OT, in which God’s presence is accompanied by similiar signs (Exod 19:16; Judg 5:4-5; cf. Ps 18:7-15; 29:3-9).

Luke is also using the rhetorical strategy of ekphrasis, that is, employing language that appeals as much to the eye as to the ear. Theon defines ekphrasis as “bringing what is portrayed clearly before the sight.” What is portrayed could be “of persons and events and places and periods of time” (Prog. 118, trans. Kennedy 2003, 45). An ekphrasis of an event could include a description of “war, peace, a storm, famine, plague, an earthquake” (Prog. 118, trans. Kennedy 2003, 45) […] The function of ekphrasis or ekphrastic language in a narrative is often to draw attention to the significance of the even thus described for the overarching argument of the narrative (Krieger 1992, 7). Such is certainly the case with the use of ekphrastic language in Luke and Acts, in which vivid language is used at key moments in the life of Jesus. […] The ekphrastic language in the Pentecost scene underscores the continuity between the founder of the “Way” and his followers. Significant events in Jesus’ life and ministry were depicted in language that appealed to the eye more than the ear. The beginning of the disciples’ “public ministry” described in similarly vivid language, marking the disciples’ reception of the Holy Spirit.

Darrell Bock, Acts (BECNT), p. 99:

These disciples begin to speak in ἑτέραις γλώσσαις (heterais glossais), which refers to other languages, as verse 8 makes clear. In the OT, the expression appears in Isa. 28:11 LXX in the singular. This one-step understanding differs from the description in 1 Corinthians, where two steps (utterance and interpretation) are required for understanding. In Acts this speaking of tongues in foreign languages is done as the Spirit gives them utterance (so also Jervell 1998: 133-34). The term for “utterance” (ἀποφθέγγεσθαι, apophthengesthai) is relatively rare, appearing only three times in the NT, all in Acts (2:4, 14; 26:25), and six times in the LXX (BDAG 125; 1 Chron. 25:1 [positively of prophecy]; Ps. 58:8 [59:7 Eng.]; Mic. 5:11 [5:12 Eng.]; Zech. 10:2; Ezek. 13:9, 19; five of these six uses are negative, of lies or false prophets). Peter will explain in verses 17-18 that all have received the pouring out of the Spirit as an indication of the arrival of God’s promised new era (see also Luke 3:15-17, where the Spirit’s coming points to the presence of the Messiah, another point Peter makes in Acts 2:36).