BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 4, 2015

Cover ArtJustin Taylor, at Between Two Worlds, introduced Scott Sunquist’s The Unexpected Christian Century.

“The third great transformation took place in the twentieth century, a great reversal . . . .

It was certainly a reversal in that the majority of Christians—or the global center—moved from the North Atlantic to the Southern Hemisphere and Asia.

But it was also a reversal in that Christianity moved from being centered in Christian nations to being centered in non-Christian nations. Christendom, that remarkable condition of churches supporting states and states supporting Christianity, died. The idea of Christian privilege in society was all but killed. And yet the religion seemed stronger than ever at the end of the twentieth century.”

At Western Seminary’s Transformed blog, Tim Harmon reviewed Mapping Modern Theology, edited by Kelly Kapic and Bruce McCormack.

Andrew Spencer, at Ethics and Culture, reviewed David Wilhite’s The Gospel according to Heretics.

Cover ArtThe Pastor as Public Theologian, by Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan, was reviewed at Books at a Glance.

“This is a volume that should be read by seminary faculty and administrators and used to shape their curriculum. It should find its way into the hands of many students at seminaries and Bible colleges…Finally, it should be read by pastors as a call to do the hard work of thinking theologically in order to equip the saints for the good works prepared in advance for them by God.”

Brian LePort recommended Dale Allison’s Constructing Jesus.

Thomas Schreiner summarized Magnifying God in Christ for Books at a Glance.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 16, 2015

Cover ArtByron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, named J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth as 2014’s Best Book Of Biblical Studies.

“What a book!…There is no doubt in my mind that this book is urgently needed — among evangelicals and mainline folks alike — to be fully clear about God’s promises of new creation, and how this vision of a restored Earth can animate and sustain our efforts for cultural reform now. Richard is an excellent Biblical scholar and has worked on this serious volume for years; the endorsements have been robust and exceptional, and early readers report it is nearly life-changing.”

Also in his Best Books of 2014 post, Borger gave a double award (Best New Contribution to Bonhoeffer Studies and Best Youth Ministry Book) to Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker by Andrew Root, and an honorable mention to From Every Tribe and Nation by Mark Noll and Reading a Different Story by Susan VanZanten.

At The Hump of the Camel, Jon Garvey reviewed A New Heaven and a New Earth.

RJS continued to discuss Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth in the post “The End of the World” at Jesus Creed.

J. Richard Middleton wrote “God’s Bringing Creation to Its Glorious Destiny” for The High Calling.

Chris Woznicki reviewed Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

At First Things, Peter Leithart reflected on the discussion of Reinhold Hutter in Reformed Catholicity.

Reformed Catholicity was listed in The Aquila Report’s New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.

At Panorama of a Book Saint, Conrade Yap reviewed Effective Intercultural Communication by A. Scott Moreau, Evvy Hay Campbell, and Susan Greener.

Christopher Skinner, at Crux Sola, reviewed Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite.

Daniel Gullotta reviewed Ancient Christian Worship by Andrew McGowan.

Elodie Ballantine Emig reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek for the Denver Journal.

At Theosblog, Lawrence Osborn reviewed Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At The Jesus Blog, Anthony LeDonne named Dale Allison’s Constructing Jesus as the best Jesus book of the 2010’s.

Robert Johnston, author of God’s Wider Presence, was interviewed in Tehelka Magazine.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 17, 2014

Cover ArtAt Books & Culture, Jesse Covington, Maurice Lee, Sarah Skripsky, and Lesa Stern engaged with Imagining the Kingdom by James K.A. Smith.

“Together, these volumes [Desiring the Kingdom and Imagining the Kingdom] pursue the ambitious goal of renewing “Christian practice,” by which Smith means mainly what happens in Christian churches and colleges. The core claim is that effective worship and education must be based on correct anthropology, on a clear understanding of how human beings really act, know, and learn.”

Also, Books & Culture editor John Wilson recently described Smith’s Cultural Liturgies series as “the most influential example of public theology in the last decade.”

Joel Willitts at Euangelion pointed readers to David Gowler’s new blog,  a Chorus of Voices: The Reception History of the Parables.

Michael Bird has been re-reading Dale Allison’s Constructing Jesus, and named Hays and Ansberry’s Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism as one of his favorite reads of 2013.

Tim Challies recommended Robert Yarbrough’s BECNT volume on 1-3 John.

Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine by Thomas Guarino was reviewed by Joseph Bottum for The Weekly Standard.

Kyle McDanell, at Blogizomia, quoted from Magnifying God in Christ by Thomas Schreiner.

At Reformedish, Derek Rishmawy reflected on J. Todd Billings’s treatment of Adoption in Union with Christ.

New Release: Constructing Jesus in Paperback

What did Jesus think of himself? How did he face death? What were his expectations of the future? In this volume, now in paperback, internationally renowned Jesus scholar Dale Allison Jr. addresses such perennially fascinating questions about Jesus.
The acclaimed hardcover edition received the “Best Book Relating to the New Testament 2011” award from the Biblical Archaeology Society.

Representing the fruit of several decades of research, this major work questions standard approaches to Jesus studies and rethinks our knowledge of the historical Jesus in light of recent progress in the scientific study of memory. Allison’s groundbreaking alternative strategy calls for applying what we know about the function of human memory to our reading of the Gospels in order to “construct Jesus” more soundly.

“This is vintage Allison: masterful in his marshaling and exposition of sources, thorough in his interaction with contemporary and opposing views, and robust and persuasive in his argumentation.” –James D. G. Dunn

“Allison has written an innovative book on the historical Jesus based on the idea that general features and recurrent motifs are much better witnesses than particular words or deeds of Jesus. Allison’s books on the historical Jesus are among my favorite books in Jesus research. I admire his erudition, sobriety, honesty, and creativity. I recommend this book to all students and colleagues.”–Gerd Theissen

Dale C. Allison Jr. (PhD, Duke University) is the Errett M. Grable Professor of New Testament Exegesis and Early Christianity at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and is counted among the top Jesus scholars working today. He is the author of numerous books, including The Historical Christ and the Theological Jesus, Studies in Matthew, Resurrecting Jesus, The Intertextual Jesus: Scripture in Q, and Jesus of Nazareth: Millenarian Prophet. He is also coeditor of The Historical Jesus in Context and coauthor of a three-volume commentary on Matthew in the International Critical Commentary series.