BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 21, 2014

Cover ArtNijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, announced the release of Jeffrey Weima’s BECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians.

“An exegetical force to be reckoned with – few scholars in the world have invested more time and energy in studying the Thessalonian correspondence than Weima. This will, no doubt, become the standard go-to work for evangelicals.

For the Glory of God by Daniel Block was named as a Worship Leader Magazine 2014 Editor’s Pick.

At Conciliar Post, Jacob Prahlow reviewed The Drama of Scripture by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

“The first edition…has long been integrated into my ‘Introduction to the New Testament’ syllabus, and this edition will take its place in short order. Non-students will also benefit from reading The Drama of Scripture, parents, pastors, theologians, and academics alike. This should be on everyone’s shelf.”

Eric Jacobsen’s The Space Between was reviewed by Walter Henegar, at The Gospel Coalition.

Jacobsen reminds us that Scripture holds place in high esteem—starting with its grand narrative arc that begins in a garden and ends in a city. In between, God’s promise to root his people in a particular place fueled their hopes and fed their sorrows for centuries. Even our Savior’s identity was tethered to a place: Jesus of Nazareth. What’s more, Jesus preached about a kingdom of shalom, or peace, that extends to every facet of human existence, including the material world he declared “very good” and commissioned us to cultivate.”

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 31, 2014

Cover ArtScot McKnight, at Jesus Creed, continues his reflections on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“It may well be that the youth do have the right to protest against their elders. If that be the case, however, the authenticity of such protest will be demonstrated by youth’s willingness to maintain solidarity with the guilt of the church-community and to bear that burden in love, abiding in penitence before God’s word.”

At The Gospel Coalition, Grant Gaines reviewed For the Glory of God by Daniel Block.

The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, was reviewed by Miguel Echevarria at Books at a Glance, and recommended by Ed Stetzer in a Christianity Today article about Biblical literacy.

Eric McKiddie, at Pastoralized, recommended A New Testament Biblical Theology by G.K. Beale.

At Words on the Word, Abram K-J recommended Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

John Morehead reflected on the Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland and Gerald McDermott.

Bryan Litfin, author of Early Christian Martyr Stories, and Mark Noll, author of From Every Tribe and Nation, were each interviewed on The Janet Mefferd Show. You can listen to Litfin’s interview here, and Noll’s here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 24, 2014

Cover ArtAndrew Root, author of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, was interviewed by Arni Zachariassen at theologues.

“Dietrich asserts that there is no such thing as “Christian youth.” Ultimately, what he wants to steer away from is an idol he thinks the church bows to often, which is to glorify youthfulness. Dietrich sees a church (and I see a church today) that badly wants a youthful spirit but not the concrete humanity of young people themselves. We want the young around the church because it makes the church seem like a vital/culturally legitimate institution. But we are less willing to make space for the young at the center of our lives together.”

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight continued his series on Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker in the posts Who Owns Bonhoeffer? and Rethinking “Youth” Ministry.

Also, Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed by Calvin Park at Random Bloggings and Diane Reynolds at Bonhoeffer: Women, Life, Times, and featured in the New Book Releases at The Englewood Review of Books.

Justin Taylor, at The Gospel Coalition, interviewed Bryan Litfin about his new book Early Christian Martyr Stories.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, shared a quote on historical criticism from God’s Word in Human Words by Kenton Sparks.

The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, was reviewed by Steve Bishop at An Accidental Blog and by Jacob Prahlow at Pursuing Veritas.

Daniel Block’s For the Glory of God was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Basil of Caesarea, by Stephen Hildebrand, was reviewed by Kyle Hughes at Early Christian Archives.

Kengo Akiyama, at Biblical and Early Christian Studies, reviewed Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 10, 2014

Cover ArtEdith Humphrey, author of Scripture and Tradition and Grand Entrance, was interviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor In Spirit.

“Many people believe that tradition is stultifying and repressive, where it is the living experience of the Church. Also, many think that it a separate authority to judge Christian matters, whereas Scripture and Holy Tradition are always intertwined.”

Publishers Weekly reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight began a series on Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker by Andrew Root.

Also, Tony Jones reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Nathaniel Peters, at First Things, reflected on Andrew Root’s The Children of Divorce.

At The Christian Century, Bradley Hill recommended The Worship Architect by Constance Cherry.

Don Garlington reviewed Warren Carter’s Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, at RBL.

Also at RBL, David Lincicum’s Paul and the Early Jewish Encounter with Deuteronomy was reviewed by Archie Wright and Robert Foster.

Englewood Review of Books and Yale News recommend Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship.

For the Glory of God , by Daniel Block, was reviewed by Colton Guffey at the Southern Resources blog.

Ivan Mesa, at Lucid Theology, reviewed The Drama of Scripture by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

In this video series Francis Moloney, author of Love in the Gospel of John, gives a survey of John’s Gospel.

On the Mortification of Spin podcast, Carl Trueman, Todd Pruitt and Aimee Byrd recommended For the Glory of God by Daniel Block.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 12, 2014

Cover ArtFaith & Leadership featured Take it from Bonhoeffer — there is no ‘Christian youth’, from Andrew Root’s forthcoming Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“To label the young ‘Christian youth,’ Bonhoeffer believes, is to make faith bound not in their humanity and the eschatological work of Christ, not in the wrestling of their being, but in this episodic time of ‘special privilege’ created by culture. Faith becomes a fashion, a particular, distinct period during which you are loyal to something before moving on to something else.

Your ‘Christian-ness’ is bound in your ‘youthfulness.’ Once youthfulness fades with age or new lifestyle commitments, so too can ‘Christian.’ ‘Christian’ was an adjective you used to describe your high school days. As you outgrow the privileged space (especially the youth group), as you outgrow your youth, you outgrow ‘Christian.’”

Also, I Read Too Much shared a pre-release review of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Jarvis Williams reviewed Douglas Moo’s Galatians BECNT volume for Books at a Glance.

Dennis Hamm, S.J, author of the Philippians, Colossians, Philemon volume in the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture (CCSS), was interviewed by the Center for Catholic Thought.

Daniel Keating’s CCSS volume on First and Second Peter, Jude was reviewed at RBL by Abson Joseph.

Antonius, at Stages of Prayer, reviewed the Acts of the Apostles volume of the CCSS, by William Kurz, SJ.

Adam Kurihara reflected on the mall and Apple in light of James K. A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Nick Nowalk, at The Strange Triumph of the Lamb, shared a quote on holiness and mission from The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

At The Gospel Coalition, Gavin Ortlund interviewed Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching.

Chris Woznicki, at Think Out Loud, is looking forward to forthcoming Baker Academic titles from Michael Allen and Scott Swain, Matthew Levering, Simon Gathercole, and Christopher Seitz.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 8, 2014

Cover ArtEternity Bible College’s Theology for Real Life blog selected James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom as their book of the month.

“And here’s where Smith’s argument gets very important. The world is busy shaping our desires. Meanwhile, the church fights back by filling our minds. We fight love with facts. This is where the worldview approach often falls short. Descartes famous saying, ‘I think therefore I am,’ summarizes our default view of humanity. We are thinking beings. So put the right knowledge into a person’s head and he or she will behave accordingly. And there is some truth here. But we all know it’s not the whole picture.”

Also working through Desiring the Kingdom, Joel Willitts at Euangelion.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Teenagers Matter by Mark Cannister.

Matthew Montonini, at New Testament Perspectives, is looking forward to George Guthrie’s forthcoming BECNT volume on 2 Corinthians.

At Hearts & Minds, Byron Borger recommended a number of Baker Academic titles, including:

Will Coberly at the Shepherds Theological Seminary blog recommended D.A. Carson’s New Testament Commentary Survey. At Wisdom For Life, Steve Cornell also recommended Carson’s survey, along with Tremper Longman’s Old Testament Commentary Survey.

Susan Holman, editor of Wealth and Poverty in Early Church and Society, was interviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor in Spirit.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 25, 2014

Cover ArtDavid Koyzis, at Christian Courier, reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

“Readers have come to appreciate the wisdom and insight that Skillen has displayed in his work over the years. This new book certainly lives up to our expectations. The Good of Politics is a biblically and historically rich primer on the political life for everyone persuaded that the claims of Christ extend to our calling as citizens.”

Also reviewing The Good of Politics, Tim Hoiland for The Englewood Review of Books.

Richard G. Smith reviewed Tremper Longman’s commentary on Job, for RBL.

Mark Votava, at Culture of Imagination, reviewed Where Mortals Dwell by Craig Bartholomew.

At Evangelicals for Social Action, Bryan Stafford reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel. Look to the comments for a response by Nation.

Joshua Torrey, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed The New Testament and Ethics, edited by Joel Green.

James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Phil Newton reviewed Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching for 9 Marks.

Tim Ghali, at Black Coffee Reflections, reviewed the Church and Postmodern Culture series.

Douglas Moo was interviewed by the Logos Academic Blog about his Galatians volume in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament.

Video: Ecclesiastes, a Book for Our Time

Ecclesiastes, a Book for Our Time

Ecclesiastes in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms

Cover ArtAbout the Book: In this addition to the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms series, Craig Bartholomew, coauthor of the well-received Drama of Scripture and a leading voice in the call for a renewal of theological biblical interpretation, combines a careful exegetical reading of the book of Ecclesiastes with keen theological insights.

Along with helpful translation and commentary, Ecclesiastes considers the theological implications of the text and its literary, historical, and grammatical dimensions. All serious students of the Bible will find here an accessible commentary that will serve as an excellent resource for their study.

“It is a rare commentary that is both readable and learned. Even rarer is one that immerses readers in the deep questions of life. Bartholomew’s new book helps us to think our way through Ecclesiastes and its mazes. More than that, it confronts us anew with the mystery and responsibility of human existence before the face of God.” – Raymond C. Van Leeuwen, Eastern University

“Bartholomew has made a major breakthrough in providing an integrated, holistic reading that recognizes the tensions within the book but regards them as intentional….Calling it a welcome addition to the commentaries on Ecclesiastes would be to understate the significance of Bartholomew’s work. I think it is a landmark!” – Stephen Dempster, Atlantic Baptist University

For more information on Ecclesiastes, click here.

New Release: Ecclesiastes

Cover ArtNow available in paperback, this addition to the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms series combines a careful exegetical reading of the book of Ecclesiastes with keen theological insights.

Written by Craig Bartholomew, coauthor of the well-received Drama of Scripture and a leading voice in the call for a renewal of theological biblical interpretation, Ecclesiastes considers the theological implications of the text and its literary, historical, and grammatical dimensions. All serious students of the Bible will find here an accessible commentary that will serve as an excellent resource for their study.

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“Bartholomew’s commentary is an extraordinary achievement, in many ways a unique contribution to the vast literature on this enigmatic biblical book. It combines an intimate knowledge of the biblical text and the secondary literature on it with a passionate commitment to reading the text as Scripture, that is, the living voice of God to believers today.” – Al Wolters, Redeemer University College

“Elegant and clear in presentation, with masterful control of the history of interpretation, Bartholomew has made a significant contribution to Ecclesiastes studies. He handles all the critical issues with care and insight and has given us a readable and penetrating portrayal of this enigmatic witness. A new standard.” – Christopher R. Seitz, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto

“[B]y combining the best historical, linguistic, literary, canonical, theological, and hermeneutical perspectives on this text, Bartholomew treats Ecclesiastes as a dynamic text that speaks powerfully into the (post)modern context of church and culture.” – Mark J. Boda, McMaster University

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Craig G. Bartholomew (PhD, University of Bristol) is the H. Evan Runner Professor of Philosophy at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Ontario, and the principal of the Paideia Centre for Public Theology. He is the author of Ecclesiastes in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms series, an associate editor of Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible, and the coauthor, with Michael W. Goheen, of The Drama of Scripture and Living at the Crossroads.

For more information on Ecclesiastes, click here.

 

The Maccabean Revolt – an Excerpt from The Drama of Scripture, 2nd Edition

The following is an excerpt from The Drama of Scripture, 2nd Edition, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

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Cover ArtIt began with an elderly priest, Mattathias ben Johanan, who had been ordered to offer up an unclean sacrifice to one of the pagan gods. Mattathias refused to do this. Instead, he killed both the compromising Jew who did offer the sacrifice and the Greek soldier who was there to see that his government’s law was carried out.

After this brave and dangerous act of defiance, Mattathias fled to the desert with his five sons and there organized a band of rebels. When in the next year the old priest died, his third son Judah assumed leadership of these guerrilla warriors. Judah was nicknamed Maccabee, “the hammer,” for hammering at the enemy, and so the rebels loyal to him came to be called Maccabeans.

Though hopelessly outnumbered by the opposing Seleucid army, the Maccabeans achieved many remarkable victories. On the twenty-fifth of December, 164 BC, three years to the day from Antiochus’s desecration of the temple, Judah Maccabee (also known—especially from Handel’s oratorio about him—by the Latinate form of his name, Judas Maccabaeus) rode into Jerusalem to shouts of “hosanna” and the waving of palm branches.

He cleansed the temple, removing from it the images of Greek gods, the foreign altars, and the other despised trappings of pagan worship, and rededicated the whole of the temple to the Lord. A new feast, Hanukkah, was established to memorialize this remarkable deliverance of the Jews from their pagan overlords (1 Macc. 4:41–61)….

It is important for us to know about these events—the Seleucid oppression of the Jewish people under Antiochus and the subsequent Maccabean revolt against the occupying pagan rulers—if we are to understand the ongoing story of Israel. This event, like the exodus, became for the Jews a defining moment in their history: God had acted to deliver his people, restore his temple, and vindicate his law.

©2014 by Craig G. Bartholomew and Michael W. Goheen. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on The Drama of Scripture, click here.