BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 13, 2013

Cover ArtSteve Bishop, at an accidental blog, reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Imagining the Kingdom.

“In the first volume, Desiring the Kingdom, Smith posed an exciting and outrageous question: “What if education wasn’t first and foremost what we know, but about what we love?” In this second volume he follows this up by suggesting that “our actions emerge from how we imagine the world: “What if we are actors before we are thinkers?” (p 32). Smith’s thesis is that we are defined more by what we worship than by what we think or believe. Thus we need to see more clearly how the affective affects the cognitive: to displace functional intellectualism, where what we do is the outcome of what we think”

Jamie Smith was also featured in the Calgary Herald article Faith Takes Practice, and Byron Borger recommended The Fall of Interpretation, Imagining the Kingdom and Desiring the Kingdom in a post about a new collection of Smith’s essays.

At Unsettled Christianity, Joel Watts reviewed Duane Watson and Terrance Callan’s Paideia commentary on First and Second Peter.

Cornelis Bennema reviewed Jonathan Pennington’s Reading the Gospels Wisely, for RBL.

Jeff Borden, at iCrucified, reviewed Classical Christian Doctrine by Ronald Heine.

Larry Hurtado recommended The World of the New Testament, edited by Joel Green and Lee McDonald.

Francis Moloney, author of The Gospel of Mark and the soon-to-be-released Love in the Gospel of John, was featured in two videos about Mark on Matthew Montonini’s blog,  New Testament Perspectives.

Preaching.com reviewed Invitation to the Psalms, by Rolf and Karl Jacobson.

J.W. Wartick reviewed For the Beauty of the Earth, by Stephen Bouma-Prediger.

Charles Clark reviewed Daniel Bell’s The Economy of Desire, for Fare Forward.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 23, 2013

Through August 29, you can get 46% off the Baker Academic Biblical Studies Bundle from Logos Bible Software. This collection contains 85 volumes, which provide insight into the historical, cultural, social, religious, literary, and theological contexts of the Old and New Testaments.

Cover ArtAt NT Exegesis, Brian Renshaw reviewed the new Paideia commentary on James and Jude, by John Painter and David DeSilva.

“I would highly recommend this commentary to both students and pastors. Any student or pastor that is beginning their study in either one of these books would be well advised to read through this commentary at the start of their study to be able to adequately grasp the books as a whole.”

Phillip Long reviewed Jonathan Pennington’s Reading the Gospels Wisely, for Themelios.

Robert Cornwall reviewed God’s Good World, by Jonathan Wilson, at Ponderings on a Faith Journey.

Derek Melleby recommends Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

James K.A. Smith, author of Imagining the Kingdom, was interviewed on the White Horse Inn blog Out of the Horse’s Mouth.

Dayton Hartman reviewed Classical Christian Doctrine, by Ronald Heine.

New Release: Classical Christian Doctrine by Ronald Heine

This clear and concise text helps readers grasp the doctrines of the Christian faith considered basic from the earliest days of Christianity. Ronald Heine, an internationally known expert on early Christian theology, developed this book from a course he teaches that has been refined through many years of classroom experience. Heine primarily uses the classical Christian doctrines of the Nicene Creed to guide students into the essentials of the faith.

This broadly ecumenical work will interest students of church history or theology as well as adult Christian education classes in church settings. Sidebars identify major personalities and concepts, and each chapter concludes with discussion questions and suggestions for further reading.

“Contemporary Protestants greatly benefit from discovering how much our faith can be traced back to the wisdom of the ancient church. In Ronald Heine’s fine introduction to central Christian doctrines, he unpacks the true ‘catholicity’ (universality) and ‘classical’ nature of our faith, inviting us not only to recognize our debt to the past but also to grow in our theological understanding in the present.”
Kelly M. Kapic, Covenant College

“Here at last is an introductory theology text that gracefully inducts beginning students into Christian doctrines deriving from the Nicene Creed. Undergraduates as well as seminarians will meet the major minds and texts that shaped classical Christian theology and emerge equipped to engage the intricacies of Christianity’s doctrinal struggles through this most lucid portal, which is replete with textual excerpts, explanatory glosses, and accessible though not overly simplified presentations of hotly debated questions.”
Ellen Charry, Princeton Theological Seminary

Ronald E. Heine (PhD, University of Illinois) is professor of Bible and Christian ministry at Northwest Christian University in Eugene, Oregon. He is the author of Reading the Old Testament with the Ancient Church and several books on Origen.
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For more information on Classical Christian Doctrine, click here.