BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 20, 2015

Cover ArtIntroducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda, was reviewed on Odd Is The New Normal.

What this book does, in its amazing depth of research, is gather together thousands of years of theology and tradition into a single place…You can tell that this book was coauthored by teachers (good teachers) in their ability to organize and present such complicated material in a manner that is approachable and enlightening.

Bob on Books reviewed Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation by Matthew Levering.

Todd Johnson and Cindy Wu, co-authors of Our Global Families, wrote a guest post for A. J. Jacobs’ Global Family Reunion.

At Transpositions, Brett Speakman reviewed Jonathan Wilson’s God’s Good World.

Jordan Hillebert, at Reformation 21, reviewed Atonement, Law and Justice by Adonis Vidu.

At Pursuing Veritas, Jacob Prahlow reviewed Thomas O’Loughlin’s The Didache.

Asbury Journal reviewed The Story of Jesus in History and Faith by Lee Martin McDonald, Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist, Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, Simon Peter in Scripture and Memory by Markus Bockmuehl, and The End of Apologetics by Myron Penner.

At Solidarity Hall, John Medaille wrote Pop Culture and Total War, a reflection on Daniel Bell’s The Economy of Desire.

Andrew Root, author of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, was interviewed on Dr. Bill Maier Live.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 27, 2014

Cover ArtDenis Fortin reviewed Robin Jensen’s Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity for RBL.

“Jensen does a magnificent job of presenting these five core motifs of baptism in early Christian documents and art. Her excellent knowledge of ancient literature is evident and her analysis of art forms very enlightening….Any student of early church history and theology will appreciate its value.”

Also at RBL, Abson Joseph reviewed the third edition of Encountering the New Testament, by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Reading the Historical Books, by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Andrew Marr reviewed David Neville’s A Peaceable Hope.

At Analogical Thoughts, James Anderson reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

James K.A. Smith, author of Who’s Afraid of Relativism? and Imagining the Kingdom, wrote Steadfast Principles in a Changing World as part of a New York Times series on Christianity and Capitalism.

Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, were recommended in the Pastors Today article How to Find a Good Commentary.

An excerpt from Mark Cannister’s Teenagers Matter was shared in Outreach Magazine.

Haddon Robinson, author of Biblical Preaching, was interviewed by Ministry Magazine.

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was recommended in Catalyst’s Summer Reading list.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 14, 2014

Cover ArtIn honor of the recently released seventh edition of D. A. Carson’s New Testament Commentary Survey, Matt Smethurst at The Gospel Coalition interviewed Carson about what makes a good commentary.

“Good all-round commentaries help readers think their way through the text—which requires adequate handling of words, sentences, flow of thought, genre, theological presuppositions, knowledge of historical setting, and, ideally, a commentary writer who is humble and of a contrite spirit and who trembles at God’s Word. But most commentaries do not do all these things (and other things—e.g., interaction with some other commentaries) equally well. That is one of the reasons one is usually wise to consult at least two or three commentaries with different emphases.”

At The Jesus Blog, Anthony Le Donne briefly reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Also reviewing Levering’s The Theology of Augustine was Nate Claiborne.

Jennifer Guo, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed R. Michael Allen’s Justification and the Gospel.

Moschos Goutzioudis reviewed The New Testament by Donald A. Hagner, for RBL.

At Raw Christianity, David Gunner Gundersen reviewed The Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations by Michael Holmes.

The Christian Century reviewed Reading a Different Story, by Susan VanZanten.

Steve Bishop, at An Accidental Blog, reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, and interviewed James Skillen about his forthcoming book The Good of Politics.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 7, 2014

Cover ArtTony Campolo reflected on The Early Church on Killing, by Ron Sider.

“The book of Hebrews reminds us that we are ‘surrounded with a great crowd of witnesses’ to which we must be responsible in all that we do, but especially in our interpretations of the Holy Writ. As Ron Sider makes his case against Christians participating in war, supporting capital punishment, or justifying abortion, he supports his beliefs by resorting to the writings of some of the earliest Church leaders, and thus, takes Church tradition seriously.”

At Euangelion, Michael Bird reviewed Craig Keener’s Acts, Volume 2.

Joseph Sherrard, at Transpositions, reviewed The Theology of Augustine by Matthew Levering.

Tim Challies recommended Grant Osborne’s Revelation volume in the BECNT series.

Rod Whitacre’s Patristic Greek Reader was recommended by Ben Witherington.

At The Anxious Bench, David Swartz reflected on Why Study History? by John Fea.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Abram K-J, at Words on the Word, reviewed Steve Moyise’s Jesus and Scripture.

At The Christian Manifesto, Calvin Moore reviewed The End of Apologetics by Myron Penner.

Phil Long reviewed Darrell Bock’s Jesus according to Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 24, 2014

Cover ArtJonathan Pennington, author of Reading the Gospels Wisely, was interviewed by Matthew Montonini at New Testament Perspectives.

James K.A. Smith wrote a response to the recent critique of Imagining the Kingdom published in Books & Culture.

Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books included Imagining the Kingdom by James K. A. Smith,  God’s Good World by Jonathan R. Wilson, and Why Study History? by John Fea in his Hearts & Minds Best Books of 2013 – Part One.

Hearts & Minds Best Books of 2013 – Part Two included Journey toward Justice by Nicholas Wolterstorff, Teenagers Matter by Mark Cannister, and Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

At RBL, Teresa Okure reviewed The Christ of the Miracle Stories by Wendy Cotter.

Jackson Watts, of the Helwys Society Forum, reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

John Walker reviewed Thomas Guarino’s Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, at Freedom in Orthodoxy.

At Unsettled Christianity, Joel Watts reviewed Lee McDonald’s The Story of Jesus in History and Faith.

John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew was reviewed by Brian LePort, at Near Emmaus.

Scott Klingsmith reviewed James Ware’s Paul and the Mission of the Church for the Denver Seminary blog.

Nijay K. Gupta’s post New Testament Scholarship: 50 Books Everyone Should Read (Part 1: Gospels), included Miracles by Craig Keener.

Postliberal Theology and the Church Catholic, edited by John Wright, and Another Reformation by Peter Ochs, were reviewed by Joseph Mangina for The Living Church.

Our monthly newsletter, E-Notes, was released this week.

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eBook Special

Through Thursday, January 30, the eBook of Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel is available for $3.99 (86% off) at participating retailers, including:

Amazon
Apple
Barnes & Noble
CBD

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 3, 2014

Cover ArtAt Euangelion, Joel Willitts reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, and Scot McKnight named it one of the Jesus Creed Books of the Year.

“[A] book that will surely create conversations for a decade about whether or not Bonhoeffer was involved in the conspiracy to assassinate Hitler.”

Brett McCracken, Marc Cortez, and Tim Hoiland all named James K.A. Smith’s Imagining the Kingdom as one of their favorite books of 2013.

David Firth reviewed Invitation to the Psalms, by Rolf Jacobson and Karl Jacobson, for RBL.

Byron Borger at Hearts and Minds reviewed and recommended Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Justification and the Gospel, by Michael Allen; Reading the Gospels Wisely, by Jonathan Pennington; and Paul and the Early Jewish Encounter with Deuteronomy, by David Lincicum were all named in Mockingbird’s list of The Top Theology Books of 2013.

Graham Ware’s Top Reads of 2013 included J. R. Daniel Kirk’s Jesus Have I Loved, But Paul? and Craig Keener’s Paul, Women & Wives.

David Moore listed Why Study History? by John Fea  in his Favorite Books of 2013.

Matt Mitchell reviewed Understanding Spiritual Warfare: Four Views, edited by James Beilby and Paul Eddy.

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eBook Special

Through Thursday, January 9, the eBook of Preaching and Teaching the Last Things by Walter C. Kaiser Jr. is available for $3.99 (80% off) at participating retailers, including:

Amazon
Apple
Barnes & Noble
CBD

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 29, 2013

Cover ArtSarah Mazengarb reviewed Steven Bouma-Prediger’s For the Beauty of the Earth, at Regent’s Ideas & Media blog.

“Bouma-Prediger suggests we ask not what we should do but who we should be.  Many books addressing the ecological crisis are full of ‘to-do’ lists.  Bouma-Prediger goes deeper, offering a unique way to approach ecological issues that is sustainable and full of vision.  As people understand who they should be—in relationship with God and the world around them—they will begin ‘to do’ what needs to be done, but it will be founded in love and gratitude rather than obligation.”

Leslie Keeney at The Ruthless Monk is in the middle of a series of posts engaging with Myron Penner’s The End of Apologetics.

David Haines reviewed Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

Nathan Millican shared an excerpt from Thomas Schreiner’s The King In His Beauty.

Steve Bishop at An Accidental Blog reviewed Why Study History? by John Fea.

At Kingdom Living, Matt Dabbs reviewed the Baker Academic Biblical Greek Collection for Logos.

Conrad Yap reviewed The Rebirth of the Church, by Eddie Gibbs, at Panorama of a Book Saint, as did Andy Hassler at the Englewood Review of Books.

History and the City of God – an Excerpt from Christian Philosophy

The following is an excerpt from Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

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Cover Art[Augustine’s] The City of God was composed to defend Christianity against the pagan charge that the fall of Rome was the result of Christian influence in the empire.

Indeed, Curtis Chang rightly argues that The City of God is an attempt to “out-narrate” the Roman narrative of Rome’s fall. Chang shows that the Roman narrative had three intertwined threads: religious, philosophical, historical. Religiously, Roman intellectuals argued that Rome had forsaken the gods. Historically, Rome had forsaken its founding myth of Romulus/Remus, as told by Virgil and others. Philosophically, it had forsaken the Platonic tradition. Augustine refutes all three of these by tracing the biblical storyline.

The City of God is a story of two invisible societies, the City of God (Jerusalem) and the city of the world (Babylon), battling through history until the last judgment. The first is bound together by love for God and the second by love for self. These cities are not to be identified with the church and the political state. Rather, they are more like spiritual forces at work in the world. It is true that the City of God is primarily found in the church, and the worldly city in various historical states including Rome, but there can be no strict identification.

In this book Augustine moves away from the static and spiritualistic Christianity of Neoplatonism toward a more dynamic, historical vision of God’s purpose in history. It is a narrative of universal history that is given its meaning by God’s providential rule, not ideas that stand above history. As Michael Mendelson puts it, “Augustine is acutely aware that scripture has an historical dimension, and he is sensitive as well to the tensions between the scriptural tradition and the Neoplatonic framework upon which he is relying. . . . Augustine’s increasing familiarity with the contents of scripture leads him to focus more and more upon the historical dimension of this tradition, a dimension alien to the intellectualism of the books of the Platonists.” Thus, for example, the struggle of evil and good is not between the material and spiritual aspects of reality but is now articulated as spiritual forces at work in the context of an unfolding story.

Nevertheless, Augustine’s attention to history does not leave behind Neoplatonic elements. While God’s providence oversees all of history, including the cultural unfolding of Babylon, in the end this city will be destroyed. It is not just evil but the city itself that will be destroyed. The significance of cultural development and life in this world is diminished. The end of history is not the restoration of creation but the establishment of the City of God, an intriguing mix between the new creation and Platonic heaven, in which the elect final escape the vagaries of this temporal world in the eternal one of the next.

©2013 by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on Christian Philosophy, click here.

New Release: Christian Philosophy, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen

Cover ArtChristian Philosophy is the third book in a series of successful introductory textbooks by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen and builds on their previous projects, The Drama of Scripture and Living at the Crossroads, to offer a comprehensive narrative of philosophical thought from a distinctly Christian perspective.

After exploring the interaction among Scripture, worldview, theology, and philosophy, the authors tell the story of philosophy from ancient Greece through postmodern times, positioning the philosophers in their historical contexts and providing Christian critique along the way. The authors emphasize the Reformed philosophical tradition without neglecting other historical trajectories and show how philosophical thought relates to contemporary life.

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Christian Philosophy explains why philosophy is vitally important for all thoughtful Christians who want their faith to engage with the world today and also gives a clear account of what it means to do philosophy as a Christian. This book is full of wisdom and insight; the ideas are powerful, and the writing is clear and engaging. It is must reading for educated Christians.” – C. Stephen Evans, Baylor University

“I have greatly appreciated the work of Bartholomew and Goheen and their thoughtful commitment to Scripture’s authority. They have proven themselves adept at articulating the truth, beauty, and explanatory power of the biblical worldview. Their application of the biblical worldview to the task of Christian philosophy reflects the richness, nuance, and breadth we have come to expect from these seasoned guides. A wise book indeed!” – Paul Copan, Palm Beach Atlantic University

“Bartholomew and Goheen have produced a clear, comprehensive, and vibrant case for Christian philosophy. Their book is an ideal text for thoughtful Christians of any age but especially for students or professors in a university context in which Christianity faces serious, sometimes hostile challenges from a secular culture. This book offers a balanced, compelling framework and line of reasoning that bring to light the intellectual power and integrity of Christian philosophy.” – Charles Taliaferro, St. Olaf College

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Craig G. BartholomewCraig G. Bartholomew (PhD, University of Bristol) is the H. Evan Runner Professor of Philosophy at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Ontario, and the principal of The Paideia Centre for Public Theology. He is the author of Ecclesiastes in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms series, an associate editor of Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible, and the coauthor, with Michael W. Goheen, of The Drama of Scripture and Living at the Crossroads.

Michael W. GoheenMichael W. Goheen (PhD, University of Utrecht) is professor of missional theology at Newbigin House of Studies, San Francisco, and Jake and Betsy Tuls Professor of Missiology at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is also minister of preaching at New West Christian Reformed Church in Burnaby, British Columbia, and is the author or coauthor of several books, including The Drama of Scripture, Living at the Crossroads, and A Light to the Nations.

For more information on Christian Philosophy, click here.