BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 29, 2015

Cover ArtByron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, featured Leisure and Spirituality by Paul Heintzman.

Thank goodness for the great “engaging culture” series from Baker Academic, and for this long-awaited, just released new volume….I think this book is nothing short of magisterial, and stands, at this point, as the definitive Christian book in the field. There is simply nothing like it on the market, and it should appeal to any number of readers.

James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism was reviewed by Renea McKenzie at Thinking Through Christianly.

Thomas Schreiner reviewed Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution for The Gospel Coalition.

We see the virtues of Gathercole’s scholarship in this stimulating work. Defending Substitution makes precise distinctions and carefully attends to Scripture. Gathercole’s use of primary sources is always illuminating, and his parallels to noble deaths in classical literature are particularly helpful.

CHOICEconnect reviewed The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

Allen Mickle, at Books at a Glance, reviewed Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians BECNT volume.

The Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament is probably, in this reviewer’s opinion, one of the best series based upon the Greek text available. Baker released their newest, 1-2 Thessalonians by Jeffrey A. D. Weima (Professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary) and it is a welcome addition.

The Gospel of John, by Francis Martin and William Wright, was reviewed by Will Duquette at Cry Wolf.

Jim Fowler reviewed Christ-Centered Preaching by Bryan Chapell.

Chris Tilling is organizing a Syndicate symposium to discuss Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, edited by Christopher Hays and Christopher Ansberry.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 25, 2014

Cover ArtDavid Koyzis, at Christian Courier, reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

“Readers have come to appreciate the wisdom and insight that Skillen has displayed in his work over the years. This new book certainly lives up to our expectations. The Good of Politics is a biblically and historically rich primer on the political life for everyone persuaded that the claims of Christ extend to our calling as citizens.”

Also reviewing The Good of Politics, Tim Hoiland for The Englewood Review of Books.

Richard G. Smith reviewed Tremper Longman’s commentary on Job, for RBL.

Mark Votava, at Culture of Imagination, reviewed Where Mortals Dwell by Craig Bartholomew.

At Evangelicals for Social Action, Bryan Stafford reviewed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel. Look to the comments for a response by Nation.

Joshua Torrey, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed The New Testament and Ethics, edited by Joel Green.

James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Phil Newton reviewed Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching for 9 Marks.

Tim Ghali, at Black Coffee Reflections, reviewed the Church and Postmodern Culture series.

Douglas Moo was interviewed by the Logos Academic Blog about his Galatians volume in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – July 18, 2014

Cover ArtThe Institute for Sacred Architecture reviewed The Space Between, by Eric Jacobsen.

“Jacobsen artfully weaves together the linear progression of the story of redemption, which starts in the Garden and ends in the Heavenly City, with our understanding of the urban environment. He states that in our place and time we are not yet in the Heavenly City; however, we can and should work toward it.”

G.K Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, John Cook and Robert Holmstedt’s Beginning Biblical Hebrew, and Rolf Jacobson and Karl Jacobson’s Invitation to the Psalms were reviewed in the Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament.

Daniel Waldschmidt, at the Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary Blog, reviewed Galatians by Douglas Moo.

At Scriptorium Daily, Matt Jenson recommended the Turning South series; comprised of Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice, Susan VanZanten’s Reading a Different Story, and Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Jordon Stone recommended Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, at the Ordinary Ministry blog.

At Daily Theology, Krista Stevens reflected on The Gospel of Mark by Francis Moloney.

David Naugle listed Bonhoeffer the Assassin? by Mark Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umbel, in the Cardus summer reading list.

The Logos Academic Blog interviewed Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Preaching.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, interviewed Christopher Hays, co-editor of Evangelicals and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, as part of his ongoing “Aha” Moments series.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 13, 2014

Cover ArtAt The Two Cities, Adam Harger reviewed Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism, edited by Christopher Hays and Christopher Ansberry.

“[T]his book is unique in helping the reader to think through the implications for faith and theology if one engages with historical-critical approaches to the Bible….One of the primary goals of the authors is to convince evangelicals of the need to engage in scholarly discussion, while assuring that it can be done without jeopardizing evangelical faith.”

Don Wacome, at Perspectives, reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom and Imagining the Kingdom.

Reading a Different Story by Susan VanZanten, as well as the overall Turning South series, were reviewed on the Books & Culture podcast.

At Pastor’s Library, Joey Cochran reviewed the fifth edition of Tremper Longman’s Old Testament Commentary Survey.

Bryan Chapell, author of Christ-Centered Sermons, was interviewed at Preaching Today. You can read part one here, and part two here.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 23, 2014

Cover ArtWriting for the Jonathan Edwards Center, Doug Sweeney announced the release of the latest volume of Cotton Mather’s Biblia Americana.

“Appearing as it does at a time of renewed historical interest in the Bible in America, this edition will spark new insights into American religious, cultural, and intellectual history….Every first-rate scholarly library should own this set.”

At First Things, Peter Leithart discussed Walter Moberly’s take on divine repentance in Old Testament Theology.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation and The Evolution of Adam, is now the Abram S. Clemens Professor of Biblical Studies at Eastern University.

Nicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice was reviewed at JohnPaulPersonal.

William Jones, at Zion CRC, reflected on The Worship Architect by Contance Cherry.

Credo Magazine reviewed Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Sermons.

 

Macro- and Micro-Interpretations – an Excerpt from Christ-Centered Sermons

Cover ArtThe following is an excerpt from Christ-Centered Sermons, by Bryan Chapell.

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We should always observe biblical texts through spectacles containing the lenses of these two questions: How is the Holy Spirit revealing in this text the nature of God that provides redemption? And how is the Holy Spirit revealing in this text the nature of humanity that requires redemption? As long as we use these lenses, we will interpret as Christ did when he showed his disciples how all Scripture spoke of him.

Asking these two questions (or using these two lenses) maintains faithful exposition and demonstrates that redemptive interpretation does not require the preacher to run from Genesis to Revelation in every sermon to expound a text’s redemptive truths. While there is nothing wrong with such macro-interpretations, it is also possible—and often more fruitful—to identify the doctrinal statements or relational interactions in the immediate text that reveal some dimension of God’s grace.

The relational interactions in such micro-interpretations can include how God acts toward his people (e.g., providing strength for weakness, pardon for sin, provision in want, faithfulness in response to unfaithfulness) or how an individual representing God provides for others (e.g., David’s care for Mephibosheth, Solomon’s wisdom recorded for others less wise)…

In essence, redemptive exposition requires that we identify an aspect of our fallen condition that is addressed by the Holy Spirit in each passage, which he inspired for our edification, and then show God’s way out of the human dilemma. Identification of an appropriate fallen condition focus (FCF) will occur in each sermon of this book. Attention to such a pattern in Scripture not only exposes the human predicament that requires God’s relief but also forces the preacher to focus on a divine solution.

Our salvation rests in God’s provision. God’s glory is always the highest purpose of the sermon. The vaunting of human ability and puffing of human pride vanish in such preaching, not because imperatives of the law of God are minimized, but because God is always the hero of the text. He enables our righteousness, pardons our unrighteousness, and provides our strength rescuing us from our human dilemma.

©2013 by Bryan Chapell. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.
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For more information on Christ-Centered Sermons, click here.

New Release: Christ-Centered Sermons

Cover ArtIn Christ-Centered Sermons, highly regarded preacher and teacher Bryan Chapell shows readers how he has prepared expository sermons according to the principles he developed in his bestselling Christ-Centered Preaching.

This companion volume provides concrete examples of how a redemptive approach to Scripture is fleshed out in various types of sermons and various genres of the Bible. The example sermons not only demonstrate different approaches but also are analyzed for pedagogical purposes, helping readers move from theory to practice.

In essence, the book allows students and preachers to look over Chapell’s shoulder as he prepares these messages, and to learn how to construct their own expository sermons.

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“Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Sermons is an important contribution to the field of homiletics. In it Chapell applies the biblical theology of Christ-Centered Preaching in helpful and well-explained examples that underscore the author’s own skill and insight.” – Scott M. Gibson, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

“With skill and imagination Bryan Chapell teaches us to preach what we practice. He unpacks principles from his classic Christ-Centered Preaching in a dazzling range of his own sermons in which we can read his helpful commentary. Rarely does a homiletician open up his mind and heart so generously. Preachers are in his debt. Again.” – Michael Quicke, Northern Seminary

“What a privilege it is for the reader of this volume to have access to the blueprints of a premier architect of expository preaching. In Christ-Centered Preaching Bryan Chapell provided principles; he said what he saw. In Christ-Centered Sermons Chapell provides examples of sermons that bring his principles to life; we can see what he said. This book is for those interested in being biblically grounded in their preparation while remaining fresh and creative in their presentation.” – Robert Smith Jr., Beeson Divinity School

“It is no easy task to preach sermons that exposit a biblical text faithfully, rightly connect it to Christ, and address hearers’ deep needs for God’s radical grace, all while communicating clearly and vividly. A good beginning is to grasp key principles and practices to be applied in crafting such rich and relevant messages. But watching a gifted preacher in action turns sound theory into transformative coaching. This is what Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Sermons offers to his fellow preachers. This collection is the next best thing to sitting across from Dr. Chapell in his pastoral study and hearing him talk through his process for composing sermons.” – Dennis E. Johnson, Westminster Seminary California

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Bryan ChapellBryan Chapell (PhD, Southern Illinois University) is senior pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church in Peoria, Illinois, as well as president emeritus and distinguished professor of preaching at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. He is a widely traveled speaker and the author of numerous books, including the bestseller Christ-Centered Preaching, Christ-Centered Worship, and Holiness by Grace.

For more information on Christ-Centered Sermons, click here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 04, 2013

Cover ArtNijay Gupta reviewed Lee McDonald’s The Story of Jesus in History and Faith, at Crux Sola.

“McDonald represents a view that tries to see faith and history as complementary (not contradictory), and that something is missing when you eliminate one. In terms of history, McDonald urges: ‘Faith in Jesus as the Christ is faith in a historical phenomenon in the sense that Christian faith is centered on God’s activity in a historical person who lived and died in Palestine in the first century’ (p. 21). On the other hand, ‘Faith…realizes that appropriation of God’s activity in Jesus cannot be found in the historical-critical dimension, but through faith alone’ (p. 21)…..I warmly recommend this to teachers and students as a ‘faith-friendly’ guide to studying the historical Jesus!”

Also, Nijay shared an excerpt from Donald Hagner’s The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction, for his post on the Purpose of Matthew.

Matthew Montonini shared his experience attending the Mullen Lecture recently delivered by Francis Moloney at St. Mary’s Seminary. Moloney’s topic was “Love in the Gospel of John: to What End?” based on his book Love in the Gospel of John.

Jesus Among Friends and Enemies, edited by Chris Keith and Larry Hurtado, was included in Brian LePort’s list of resources for studying John the Baptist.

Perry Oakes reviewed Gary Long’s Grammatical Concepts 101 for Biblical Hebrew, for RBL.

Dave, at Can’t Catch My Breath, shared from Eddie Gibbs’ The Rebirth of the Church.

J. Todd Billings’ Union with Christ, G.K. Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology, and Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching, were recommended in Derek Rishmawy’s Reformedish Seminary Starter Kit.

Michael Kruger, at The Gospel Coalition, included Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics: Prolegomena in his Top 10 Books on the Bible’s Authority.

Englewood Review of Books featured Bonhoeffer the Assassin?, by  Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony Siegrist, and Daniel Umble in their new release update.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 27, 2013

Cover ArtThomas Guarino, author of Vincent of Lérins and the Development of Christian Doctrine, wrote the First Things article “Pope Francis Looks to St. Vincent of Lérins.”

“The pope rightly notes that St. Vincent compares the growth of doctrine to the gradual development whereby a child becomes an adult. Vincent’s (and Francis’) point, of course, is that over the years there occurs a refinement, maturation, and ripening of Christian doctrine.”

Derek Rishmawy shared A Prayer for Preachers and The 3:00 A.M. Test For Preaching from Bryan Chapell’s Christ-Centered Preaching.

In his post “’Sola Scriptura,’ ‘Prima Scriptura,’ or ‘Scriptura et Doctrina’?” Nijay Gupta referenced Scripture and Tradition, by Edith Humphrey.

Kent Sparks’s God’s Word in Human Words was used by Peter Enns in his post “Is God restricted by what the Bible says?”

Kevin DeYoung wishes he had time to read Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty.

John Fea has been doing a series of posts on Why Study History? sightings.

Daniel Kirk, author of Jesus Have I Loved, but Paul?, was interviewed by Tripp Fuller on Homebrewed Christianity.

The Maxwell Institute Podcast interviewed Myron Penner about his recent book, The End of Apologetics.