BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 7, 2014

Cover ArtIn the latest issue of Biblotheca Sacra, Glenn Kreider reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism, which he “highly recommended,” and Kreider also reviewed Imagining the Kingdom.

“This is an excellent book, a profound theological evaluation of worship. It should be required reading for every pastor or minister, especially those who lead worship.”

Jacob Prahlow, at Pursuing Veritas, reviewed The Church According to Paul by James Thompson.

Hans Madueme, coeditor of Adam, the Fall, and Original Sin, was interviewed by Phillip Newman at Covenant College.

At KFUO, Andrew Root was interviewed about his new book Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Brett David Potter, at The Other Journal, reflected on Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life.

At ἐνθύμησις, Jacob Cerone began a series on Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

At Euangelion, Michael Bird announced Simon Gathercole’s forthcoming Defending Substitution.

Byron Borger, at Hearts & Minds Books, is excited to read God’s Wider Presence by Robert Johnston.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 22, 2014

Cover ArtWesley Ellis, at Living in the Kingdom, reviewed Andrew Root’s forthcoming Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

“Root looks to present Bonhoeffer’s youth ministry as a consistent lens for understanding his development of thought. Bonhoeffer’s theology didn’t develop out of the ether, but emerged from his relationships and from his engagement in the concrete lived experience of the young people to whom he ministered throughout his life.”

The Bible Gateway Blog interviewed Patricia Dutcher-Walls, author of Reading the Historical Books.

A number of Baker Academic titles were reviewed in the latest volume of Themelios, including:

Jennifer Guo reviewed Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life.

At The Poor in Spirit Alvin Rapien interviewed Daniel Bell, author of The Economy of Desire.

Kevin Davis, at After Existentialism, Light, reflected on Christopher Seitz’s The Character of Christian Scripture.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – August 15, 2014

Cover ArtBruce Ellis Benson, author of Liturgy as a Way of Life, was interviewed by Alvin Rapien at The Poor in Spirit.

“What is liturgy? Probably the simplest way of answering that is that it all about how we live our lives. We have routines; we have ways of doing things; we have things that are essential to our lives. How we order our lives has to do with what we value. So, far from being just some kind of thing that “liturgical churches” do, liturgy is something that we cannot help but do on a daily basis.”

The Verbum Blog interviewed Mary Healy and Peter Williamson, editors of the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture series and authors of the volumes on The Gospel of Mark and Ephesians. Read part one and part two of their discussion.

Hoon Lee, at Exploring Church History, reviewed Timothy Wengert’s Reading the Bible with Martin Luther.

At Panorama of a Book Saint, Conrade Yap reviewed Encountering the Book of Romans by Douglas Moo.

Conversations in Faith reviewed Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher- Walls.

The Books & Culture Podcast discussed J. Richard Middleton’s forthcoming A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Thomas Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty was reviewed by David Maas for RBL.

Joshua Torrey, at Grace for Sinners, reviewed Clayton Jefford’s Reading the Apostolic Fathers.

Marc Cortez listed Practicing Christian Doctrine by Beth Felker Jones in his post The Best Theology Books from the First Half of 2014.

At Brief Inquisition? Michael Hansen reflected on James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

James Skillen, author of The Good of Politics was interviewed about the conflicts in Iraq, Gaza, and Ukraine by the Christian Courier.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 25, 2014

Cover ArtNicholas Wolterstorff’s Journey toward Justice was reviewed in The Christian Century.

“This book is an extraordinary gift to the church, an invitation into an understanding of the Christian drama that is focused on advocacy for those who are being denied their fundamental value as human beings. Accessible yet demanding, it is a powerful contribution to the literature.”

The latest issue of Themelios includes reviews of a number of Baker Academic titles, including:

Wyatt Graham reviewed Psalms as Torah by Gordon Wenham.

At My Digital Seminary, Lindsay Kennedy reviewed Tremper Longman’s volume on Job in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms.

Bob Hayton, at Fundamentally Reformed, shared a quote from G.K. Beal’s A New Testament Biblical Theology.

Joel Watts, at Unsettled Christianity, reviewed Liturgy as a Way of Life by Bruce Benson.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 31, 2014

Cover ArtAt Reading Acts, Phil Long reviewed Michael Bird’s Are You the One Who Is To Come? and Bruce Fisk’s A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Jesus.

“Fisk succeeds in presenting some of the more difficult problems for modern people studying the Historical Jesus in an entertaining and compelling fashion. The book would make an excellent textbook for a Gospels class at the undergraduate level and a good introduction for a layperson wanting to get an understanding of some of the more difficult issues discussed by Historical Jesus scholars.”

Joel Willitts reflected on The Suffering and Victorious Christ, by Richard Mouw and Doug Sweeney.

Craig Blomberg reviewed Raymond Collins’ Second Corinthians Paideia commentary, for the Denver Seminary Journal.

The 5th Edition of Tremper Longman’s Old Testament Commentary Survey was reviewed by Rick Wadholm.

At ThinkApologetics, Eric Chabot reviewed Introducing Apologetics, by James Taylor.

At Blogizomai, Kyle McDanell  reviewed Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, by Warren Carter.

David Naugle, at One Theology, reviewed Jonathan R. Wilson’s God’s Good World.

Anthony Le Donne recommended Jesus Among Friends and Enemies, edited by Larry Hurtado and Chris Keith.

At Transpositions, Jim Watkins discussed Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life, and its application to copyright law.

Book Symposium on Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life

Over the past several weeks The Church and Postmodern Culture blog has hosted a book symposium on Liturgy as a Way of Life: Embodying the Arts in Christian Worship by Bruce Ellis Benson. Contributors included Ed Phillips, Linda Borecki, and Nathaniel Marx, with responses from Bruce Benson. Here are the links for the engaging conversation that took place about this fascinating book.

Ed Phillips’ review of Liturgy as a Way of Life

Bruce Benson’s response to Phillips

Linda Borecki’s review of Liturgy as a Way of Life

Bruce Benson’s response to Borecki

Nathaniel Marx’s review of Liturgy as a Way of Life

Bruce Benson’s response to Marx

About the Book:

Philosopher Bruce Ellis Benson explores how the arts inform and cultivate service to God, helping the church to not only think differently about the arts but also act differently. He contends that we are all artists, that our very lives should be seen as art, and that we should live liturgically in service to God and neighbor.

Working from the biblical structure of call and response, Benson rethinks what it means to be artistic and recovers the ancient Christian idea of presenting oneself to God as a work of art. Rather than viewing art as practiced only by the few, Benson argues that we are all called by God to be artists. He reenvisions art as the very core of our being: we are God’s own art, and God calls us to improvise as living and growing works of art. Benson also examines the nature of liturgy and connects art and liturgy in a new way.

“This packs a lot of punch for a short book. Yet the tone is gracious, cautious, and often conversational. It signals a new ‘turn’ in worship studies: a concern for a theologically rich and culturally alert engagement with the arts in congregational worship. It deserves a wide readership and will doubtless provoke a whole series of fruitful improvisations.”
Jeremy Begbie, Thomas A. Langford Research Professor of Theology, Duke University

“‘Call and response’ and ‘improvisation’ are only two of the many ideas Benson fleshes out in this book. I appreciate these two especially because our culture has so misunderstood the terms ‘liturgy’ and ‘creativity’ (which is God’s alone). We need a philosopher to set us right.”
Marva J. Dawn, author of Reaching Out without Dumbing Down, A Royal “Waste” of Time, and How Shall We Worship?

New Release: Liturgy as a Way of Life

Philosopher Bruce Ellis Benson explores how the arts inform and cultivate service to God, helping the church to not only think differently about the arts but also act differently. He contends that we are all artists, that our very lives should be seen as art, and that we should live liturgically in service to God and neighbor.

Working from the biblical structure of call and response, Benson rethinks what it means to be artistic and recovers the ancient Christian idea of presenting oneself to God as a work of art. Rather than viewing art as practiced only by the few, Benson argues that we are all called by God to be artists. He reenvisions art as the very core of our being: we are God’s own art, and God calls us to improvise as living and growing works of art. Benson also examines the nature of liturgy and connects art and liturgy in a new way.

“This packs a lot of punch for a short book. Yet the tone is gracious, cautious, and often conversational. It signals a new ‘turn’ in worship studies: a concern for a theologically rich and culturally alert engagement with the arts in congregational worship. It deserves a wide readership and will doubtless provoke a whole series of fruitful improvisations.”
-Jeremy Begbie, Duke University

“Jazz music–so creative and free, so grounded and disciplined–provides a vivid and illuminating metaphor for reflecting on the internal dynamics of faithful and fruitful Christian lives and worship practices. This book pushes readers beyond any initial superficial appeal of this analogy to explore how it might radically convert our perceptions about the shape, tone, and sheer beauty of Christian discipleship.”
-John D. Witvliet, Calvin Institute of Christian Worship

Bruce Ellis Benson (PhD, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven) is professor of philosophy at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. His areas of expertise include contemporary French thought and philosophy of art. He is the author of Graven Ideologies, The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue, and Pious Nietzsche, and the coeditor of several books, including Evangelicals and Empire.

For more information on Liturgy as a Way of Life, click here.

Video: Bruce Benson discusses Liturgy as a Way of Life


Introducing Liturgy as a Way of Life


Improvisation and Call & Response


We Are All Artists


Living Liturgy

Working from the biblical structure of call and response, philosopher Bruce Ellis Benson rethinks what it means to be artistic and recovers the ancient Christian idea of presenting oneself to God as a work of art. Rather than viewing art as practiced only by the few, Benson argues that we are all called by God to be artists. He reenvisions art as the very core of our being: we are God’s own art, and God calls us to improvise as living and growing works of art. Benson also examines the nature of liturgy and connects art and liturgy in a new way.

For more information about Liturgy as a Way of Life, click here.