BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 5, 2016

Cover ArtUsing and Enjoying Biblical Greek, by Rodney Whitacre, was reviewed at Exegetical Tools.

“A valuable tool for anyone who has taken one year of Greek or one who is a little rusty and wants to return to one’s first love. The format is easy to follow and the examples are good at illustrating points discussed in the book. For someone who has kept their Greek and uses it on a daily basis, I find chapter six alone is worth the price of the book…If you are learning Greek or use Greek daily, this is a book worth having on your shelf and working through.”

Also at Exegetical Tools, a series on D. A. Carson’s classic Exegetical Fallacies.

RJS, at Jesus Creed, explored J. Richard Middleton’s critique of rapture theology in A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Cover ArtIntroducing Biblical Hermeneutics, by Craig Bartholomew, was reviewed at Sojourner Theology.

“An excellent introduction to the task of biblical interpretation….Bartholomew has produced a volume that is both comprehensive and readable, and his hermeneutical vision captures the essence of biblical revelation well….This is a monumental achievement in the field of biblical interpretation and the pastor, teacher or student would do well in referring to it often.”

Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed at Resistance & Renewal.

At Scriptorium Daily, Fred Sanders discussed a section on Trinitarianism in Stanley Porter’s Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 19, 2015

Cover ArtAt First Things, Peter Leithart discussed Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution.

“Gathercole finds a common theme running through alternatives to substitutionary conceptions of atonement: They emphasize the cosmic and oppressive power of Sin, but downplay the role of specific acts of sin—sins—in Paul’s theology.”

Justin Mihoc and Joshua Mann reviewed the second volume of Craig Keener’s commentary on Acts for RBL.

“[Acts: An Exegetical Commentary] has already become, and will certainly remain for a long time, a standard reference work in Acts studies. His encyclopedic opus is certainly to be praised and valued by scholars as the most extensive study of sociorhetorical exegesis of Acts.”

Johnny Walker, at Freedom in Orthodoxy, reviewed Matthew Levering’s Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation.

“Wonderful in its clarity and in its breadth of engagement with contemporary positions and proposals. His own account deserves a wide-hearing and will be something of a bench-mark I’m sure for Catholic account of the role of Church and Scripture in God’s self-witness to the world.”

Larry Hurtado reviewed Early Christianity in Contexts, edited by William Tabernee.

“For readers who might want to push out their own frontiers of knowledge of early Christianity, this book will be a gold mine.”

Also, Early Christianity in Contexts was reviewed by Peter Head at Evangelical Textual Criticism.

Herman Bavinck’s Essays on Religion, Science, and Society was reviewed by Dayton Hartman at For the Gospel.

The Bonhoeffer Center reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament, by Stanley Porter, was reviewed at The Washington Book Review.

Peter Williamson, author of Ephesians and Revelation in the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture, was interviewed at Catholic Bibles.

Finally, congrats to J. Richard Middleton, whose A New Heaven and a New Earth won the Word Award for the category of Biblical Studies.

“The Young One” – Bonhoeffer and His Family

BeyondTheBookBA

Today we are pleased to share the latest post in our weekly series, Beyond the Book. This month Andrew Root will be discussing the backstory to Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s passion for working with young people.

**Also, as part of this series we are giving away three copies of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker. Today is the final day of the giveaway, and you can enter here.**

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Dietrich Bonhoeffer was deeply connected to his family. I believe it was his experience as a twin and the close-knit connection with his siblings that not only led him deeper into children and youth ministry, but also shaped his practice as youth worker.

The Bonhoeffer children were quite a successful group. The oldest, Karl-Friedrich, became a world-renowned physicist, and Klaus became a lawyer. Dietrich would always feel close to them, but like almost every younger brother, a spirit of competitiveness also fueled their relationship, especially for Dietrich, for not only was he the youngest brother, he was a great deal younger, just a small child in their own adolescence and a budding adolescent as they entered adulthood and married. Dietrich hovered around the edges of his older brothers’ lives, treated with respect by them but always as the younger one. This experience of being always treated as young in his family, of having his familial identity as one of the young ones (as the only boy of the younger half of the family), solidified in Dietrich a kind of sensitivity to the experience of fellow young ones, of children. Dietrich’s role in his own family system was as the gifted, adventurous young one; this was how the family viewed him, even into his thirties. This was a role that he, for the most part, would never shed. Unlike all of his other siblings, Dietrich remained single, even living at his parents’ home throughout most of his life.

Cover ArtThe two oldest daughters, Ursula and Christine, married important men in their own right. Ursula married lawyer Rudiger Schleicher, and Christine married a playmate of Klaus’s named Hans von Dohnanyi. Dohnanyi became a high-ranking government official, and it was eventually Dohnanyi who not only filled in the Bonhoeffer family on the barbarism of the Nazis but also made way for Dietrich to enter the Abwehr (the German intelligence agency of which Dohnanyi was a high-ranking member) and become a double-agent spy.

These two men officially entered into the family in Dietrich’s own adolescence. Both of these men gave great attention to young Dietrich, debating issues with him and taking him places. It may be that the origins of Dietrich’s own giftedness with young people rests with these two men and their attention to him. Both Schleicher and Dohnanyi listened intently to Dietrich, respected his opinion, asked him many questions, and, even at a young age, treated him like a young friend. These relationships became a kind of model for Dietrich in his own youth ministry. Schleicher and Dohnanyi loved to enter into deep conversation with Dietrich about issues of the day or his own hopes and struggles; Dietrich was known for doing the same with his confirmands, even starting youth groups to have such conversations.

But it wasn’t only this attention in conversation that shaped young Dietrich’s relationships with Schleicher and Dohnanyi; these brothers-in-law also invited Dietrich to plays, operas, and other cultural outings in Berlin. This, too, became a major staple of Dietrich’s own youth ministry, as he paid out of his own pocket for the young people to join him in hearing an orchestra or enjoying the countryside.

Dietrich’s very location within the family gave him the unique opportunities to have adults take interest in him and mentor him. It was both these relationships and his role as young (as always a young one) in his family that I believe directed his own interests and forged his gifts in youth ministry.

But there may be more that solidified this sensitivity toward young people for Dietrich, this sensitivity that was born from his own childhood experience. Not only was Dietrich seen always as a young one within his family system but also, as one of the young ones, he was the leader of the young ones. So along with the privilege of the upper-middle-class intellectual family with its multiple older-sibling mentors, within his environment Dietrich was still able to flex muscles of leadership. Both his twin sister, Sabin, and his youngest sister, Susanne, report that Dietrich was their hero, always protecting and leading them as these young ones were shuttled away from the activities of the older children and parents, spending many hours alone playing, dreaming, and contemplating. It was Dietrich who was the leader of these games and existential journeys.

Young Dietrich led his sisters in prayer, played church with them, created secret codes for them to communicate, and led them into times of contemplating death. These three young ones were often alone to wrestle together with the mysterious questions of childhood—the mysteries of transcendence, connection, and loss—and Dietrich was their guide into such contemplation. So not only was Dietrich always seen as young in the family system and embraced by his brothers-in-law, being taught the intrinsic value of childhood, but with his younger sisters he was taken into the depth and mystery with which children must wrestle, mysteries like death and attachment. With his younger sisters, Dietrich explored these mysteries, pretending—even wishing—that he would die, imagining with them what it would be like at his funeral.

And these questions may have sat near the surface for Dietrich not only because he was attached to a close-knit family and allowed to embrace his childhood but also because his own being was bound to Sabine’s as her twin. This wrestling with attachment and yet difference seemed to engender questions that Dietrich would wrestle with his whole life. It is interesting to think that the very social orientation of his theology, the deep place of relationship and community (“Christ as existing as church community,” the thesis of his first theological work, Sanctorum Communio), had its origins in his childhood experience of being a twin, of grappling with the mysteries of existence as a child with his younger sisters, and of always being respected and heard in friendship by the husbands of his older sisters.

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Andrew RootAndrew Root (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is Carrie Olson Baalson Chair of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is the author of numerous books, including The Children of Divorce, Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry, and Relationships Unfiltered, and the coauthor (with Kenda Creasy Dean) of The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry.

 

Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the Death of Walter

BeyondTheBookBA

Today we are pleased to share the latest post in our weekly series, Beyond the Book. This month Andrew Root will be discussing the backstory to Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s passion for working with young people.

Also, as part of this series we are giving away three copies of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker. The winners will be announced at the end of the month, and you can enter here.

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In the last post we saw a young Dietrich Bonhoeffer makes an incredibly strong theological push for the importance of the child. And unfortunately, this has been unusual—it is odd for an epoch-making theologian like Bonhoeffer (particularly a modern one) to make children so central. So what is the backstory to Bonhoeffer’s own attention to the experience of children?

Cover ArtWhen Dietrich was small both his family, and Germany as a whole, lived in an idyllic state. But this would all be punctured in 1914 as the Kaiser announced war. With these words the national ethos of peace and prosperity was lost. But this loss came with little regret; rather, the German populace celebrated the announcement, as if the peace and prosperity had become all too boring and war promised some excitement.

But too soon hell came to earth and swallowed so many of Europe’s young men. The hell of war would touch everyone, even the Bonhoeffers. All three of the oldest Bonhoeffer sons entered the military and went to the front; the oldest two, Karl-Fredrick and Walter, went first. If Karl-Friedrich and Klaus took after their father, then it was Walter (who in age rested between Karl-Friedrich and Klaus) that belonged to his mother. Walter was sensitive and artistic, in many ways his mother’s favorite. As the two older boys departed, the Bonhoeffer family had known only success and happiness and had no reason to worry that such a state would not continue. But it would not, as Walter met his demise, penning a final letter to his parents as he died from injuries, telling them not to worry as he relayed information of his battalions’ advance with his last breaths.

Yet Walter’s letter was no comfort to Dietrich’s parents Karl and Paula, but rather a poisonous pill. Paula, particularly, was broken, howling the deepest wounds of loss as she grieved her vanished boy. The perfect upper-middle-class house had to receive into its walls the screams of godforsaken pain of a mother for her dead child. Twelve-year-old Dietrich could only listen, witnessing his mother’s keening and his father’s silent agony. It would mark his childhood and adolescence.

Both parents could barely stand up under the loss and grief. Paula could not stand being haunted by the house, so in her frantic agony she left and stayed with a neighbor for nearly a year, bedridden and in anguish, grieving the loss of her Walter away from Karl and the children. Karl retreated into his study, to stew in his pain, finding no will to write in the family journal for years to come. The journal was a testimonial to the family’s growth, but now the soil in which the family was planted was soaked with Walter’s blood.

Dietrich was left to contemplate Walter’s loss with only his sisters, turning over and over in his head what this meant. The impact of such an experience in childhood cannot be underestimated. This was, by all accounts, the first great tragedy for the family, and in turn, the first of Dietrich’s young life. Such an experience lived on within him, and having this experience as a child may have further given him sensitivity to the personhood and mystery of children and youth.

The depth of this experience on Dietrich’s own person can be substantiated by the fact that after Walter’s death Dietrich was given Walter’s confirmation Bible as his own. And it was this Bible, with Walter’s name still inscribed in it, that Dietrich used for the rest of his life. This Bible not only reminded him always of his brother but no doubt must have also taken him back to his own childhood.

And this may be true for many of us also; we find ourselves in youth or children’s ministry not because we are immature, unable to escape some Peter Pan Syndrome, but, I would bet, because many of us have had deep childhood experiences that we cannot shake, that make us aware of the depth and mystery of childhood itself. It is this depth and mystery that draws us to minister to young people, to stand beside them and hear their questions and thoughts, knowing that young people may be touching a deep reality where the divine and human collide.

It was this experience with Walter’s death that would be a major part of the backstory that leads the Bonhoeffer of Act and Being to assert that children are the eschatological form of our humanity and therefore must be placed at the center of the church. This experience impressed on Bonhoeffer that children encounter deep realities. But it was his experience of his siblings that would impact directly his ministry.

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Andrew RootAndrew Root (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is Carrie Olson Baalson Chair of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is the author of numerous books, including The Children of Divorce, Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry, and Relationships Unfiltered, and the coauthor (with Kenda Creasy Dean) of The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – April 17, 2015

Cover ArtAt RBL, Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed by Trent Butler (here) and Wilhelm Wessels (here).

This is a book that exudes so much knowledge about matters pertaining to the Hebrew Bible and wisdom about life that it should be read by academics, theologians, seminary teachers, and also ministers in the Christian tradition.

There were a number of reviews and reflections on Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker this week, including: The Heavy Laden Bookshelf, Relevant Magazine, Lutheran Confessions, Youth Front, and an interview at Premier Youthwork.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Peter Oakes’ new Paideia commentary on Galatians.

Let me say, as someone who has read every single word of this fine volume, that it is a “must-have.”

James, at Thoughts, Prayers & Songs, reviewed God’s Wider Presence by Robert Johnston.

Andrew McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship was reviewed by Lee Jefferson at Marginalia and by Larry Hurtado.

Reading the Historical Books by Patricia Dutcher- Walls was reviewed at Conversation in Faith.

Books at a Glance shared an excerpt from D.A. Carson’s Praying with Paul.

James K. A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism? and J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth made the sort list for this year’s Word Awards.

 

The Child as Eschatological

BeyondTheBookBA

Today we are pleased to share the latest post in our weekly series, Beyond the Book. This month Andrew Root will be discussing the backstory to Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s passion for working with young people.

Also, as part of this series we are giving away three copies of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker. The winners will be announced at the end of the month, and you can enter here.

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Last week I introduced Bonhoeffer as youth worker, explaining that these post would focus on Dietrich’s backstory, and how he came to see children and youth as having central importance in the community of the church. Yet before we can go into our exercise in backstory, we need a little bit more on why Bonhoeffer saw children as so important.

At the end of a year-long internship in Barcelona, where most of it was spent leading Sunday school, Dietrich returned to Berlin to write is habilitation (a second dissertation that qualifies you to lecture in the German university system). After month of important children’s and youth ministry in Barcelona, he decided that he’d write the habilitation on the consciousness of children. But his advisor, Seeberg, balked. So Dietrich had to write a more philosophical work called Act and Being. But Dietrich couldn’t let go of his questions around children, so he smuggled the theme into the final pages. While he could not make the whole project revolve around children, as he wished, he could bring children in at the end of this dense academic piece.

Cover ArtBonhoeffer enters into this discussion on the importance of children by discussing baptism. He says that baptism makes us all children, making our eschatological form that of the child, for the child is through both act and being. He says, “Baptism is the call to the human being into childhood, a call that can be understood only eschatologically.”1 Here Bonhoeffer makes not only a significant theological argument for the essential importance of children but also asserts that it is the very form of the child that is normative. The child must stand at the center of the church-community because child is the eschatological form of humanity; the child is through both divine and human act and being. It may be, following Bonhoeffer, that a sign of a congregation’s faithfulness, its is not big buildings or full membership roles but its willingness to embrace children.

This is as far as Bonhoeffer pushes in Act and Being, leaving us with more questions than answers, leaving us so wishing Seeberg had permitted Bonhoeffer to explore his original desire. But what cannot be missed is the central importance of the child in the thought of Bonhoeffer. And this centrality of the child seems clearly born from Bonhoeffer’s ministry experience. For the thoughts that came together in Act and Being actually had their origins while he was still in Barcelona. The second lecture Bonhoeffer gave to his congregation in Barcelona on December 11, 1928, asserted that Jesus himself is the creator of childhood, making childhood the form and shape of discipleship. Bonhoeffer says:

Once when Jesus is out with his disciples and they are arguing over the rewards they will receive for living in this discipleship, Jesus “called a child, whom he put among them, and said, ‘Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven’” (Matt. 18:2–3), or “if any of you put a stumbling block before one of these little ones who believe in me, it would be better for you if a great millstone were hung around your neck and you were thrown into the sea” (Mark 9:42). For Jesus the child is not merely a transitional stage on the way to adulthood, something to be overcome; quite the contrary, he or she is something utterly unique before which the adult should have the utmost respect. For indeed, God is closer to children than to adults. In this sense, Jesus becomes the discoverer of the child. He sees the children and wants to belong to them; who would block his path? God belongs to children, the good news belongs to children, and joy in the kingdom of heaven belongs to children. “Woe to anyone who puts a stumbling block before one of these little ones.” This notion is so utterly alien to the sensibility of antiquity that only one other might seem even more alien, namely, that Jesus, this man of the ruthless either-or, goes not only to children but also to sinners. He traffics with the socially despised, the outcasts, the tax collectors, the deceivers, and the prostitutes.2

These are profound words, ones that those of us in children’s/youth ministry should hear. Bonhoeffer sees the child and childhood not (primarily) as a developmental category but as a theological gift given to the church to live eschatologically through both act and being. The child is not less-than for Bonhoeffer but the very form (the very being) of the followers of Jesus. The child is the one who experiences most fully the act of God in Christ; only the poor and outcast are as dear to Jesus as the child, Bonhoeffer says in the 1928 lecture. It is the child as being that brings the act of God near. And we all are welcomed into this act and being of God’s very eschatological self, for all of us have been children and now are called to care for them. But caring for them not as innocent—an untheological modern idea—but as eschatological, as those who witness to the act and being of God.

It may be, following the logic of Bonhoeffer, that churches that honor children, giving them a place at the center of their life-community, carrying them in love, bear the sign of the true community.

1. Bonhoeffer, Act and Being, 159.
2. Bonhoeffer, Barcelona, Berlin, New York, 352; my italics.

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Andrew RootAndrew Root (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is Carrie Olson Baalson Chair of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is the author of numerous books, including The Children of Divorce, Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry, and Relationships Unfiltered, and the coauthor (with Kenda Creasy Dean) of The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry.

 

Beyond the Book – Bonhoeffer’s Backstory

BeyondTheBookBA

Today we are pleased to share the latest post in our weekly series, Beyond the Book. This month Andrew Root will be discussing the backstory to Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s passion for working with young people.

Also, as part of this series we are giving away three copies of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker. The winners will be announced at the end of the month.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Cover ArtEveryone loves a backstory. Case in point is the new AMC hit series Better Call Saul. The whole show is a backstory on how Saul became the always witty, gleefully corrupt lawyer of the meth dealer Walter White in Breaking Bad (it’s a backstory spinoff, and though that sounds like the recipe for a crap show, it’s great—but I digress).

In these four short blog posts I’m providing a little backstory: how Dietrich Bonhoeffer became a theologian with young people on his mind, or how Bonhoeffer was a youth worker doing the theological with young people. Some may think it odd for me to be connecting Bonhoeffer and youth work at all. But one of the most glaring oversights in Bonhoeffer scholarship has been the inattention to the utter consistency of Dietrich’s ministry with children and youth. From the time Dietrich was nineteen (in 1925) until the war broke out in 1939, the most consistent piece of Dietrich’s life was his ministry to young people. Looking at Bonhoeffer from the locale of his pastoral ministry, it would be mistaken to see him as anything other than a youth worker.

But I won’t try to convince you of this in these four posts. (You’ll have to check out the book Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for that). Rather, I’ll ask you to assume this is central in Bonhoeffer’s life and take you instead to the backstory. We will explore what in Bonhoeffer’s own childhood and youth made him so interested in young people. I believe that there are a couple of important experiences that not only made Bonhoeffer aware of the importance of children, but more deeply, made him recognize that their experience holds deep theological and existential significance.

Why is this important? Exploring Bonhoeffer’s own childhood experiences may help us see something important about our own ministries to the young. We’ve too often seen children’s or youth ministry as the operation that wins youthful loyalty, as zones of entertainment, and privileged (set apart) spaces for learning, but Bonhoeffer saw young people and our ministry to them as something much deeper. So before we can get to a little backstory from Bonhoeffer’s childhood, we need to first explore Bonhoeffer’s understanding of the place of the child in the church. That will be our topic next Monday (4/13). Then we will uncover the impact of Walter’s death (4/20), and the role of his siblings (4/27).

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Andrew RootAndrew Root (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is Carrie Olson Baalson Chair of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is the author of numerous books, including The Children of Divorce, Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry, and Relationships Unfiltered, and the coauthor (with Kenda Creasy Dean) of The Theological Turn in Youth Ministry.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 20, 2015

Cover ArtIntroducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda, was reviewed on Odd Is The New Normal.

What this book does, in its amazing depth of research, is gather together thousands of years of theology and tradition into a single place…You can tell that this book was coauthored by teachers (good teachers) in their ability to organize and present such complicated material in a manner that is approachable and enlightening.

Bob on Books reviewed Engaging the Doctrine of Revelation by Matthew Levering.

Todd Johnson and Cindy Wu, co-authors of Our Global Families, wrote a guest post for A. J. Jacobs’ Global Family Reunion.

At Transpositions, Brett Speakman reviewed Jonathan Wilson’s God’s Good World.

Jordan Hillebert, at Reformation 21, reviewed Atonement, Law and Justice by Adonis Vidu.

At Pursuing Veritas, Jacob Prahlow reviewed Thomas O’Loughlin’s The Didache.

Asbury Journal reviewed The Story of Jesus in History and Faith by Lee Martin McDonald, Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist, Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, Simon Peter in Scripture and Memory by Markus Bockmuehl, and The End of Apologetics by Myron Penner.

At Solidarity Hall, John Medaille wrote Pop Culture and Total War, a reflection on Daniel Bell’s The Economy of Desire.

Andrew Root, author of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, was interviewed on Dr. Bill Maier Live.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 13, 2015

Cover ArtThe Englewood Review of Books reviewed From Every Tribe and Nation by Mark Noll.

Noll’s memoir of discovery calls our attention to the infinitely larger story of global Christianity. May it inspire us to appreciate and share God’s heart for his people whom he is gathering to himself from every tribe and nation.

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek, and reflected on evangelism and community in light of James Thompson’s The Church According to Paul.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Mark Gignilliat at Reformation 21, and by Patrick Schreiner at Ad Fontes.

Library Journal reviewed Charles Farhadian’s forthcoming Introducing World Religions, and Handbook of Religion, edited by Terry Muck, Harold Netland, and Gerald McDermott.

Jeffrey Weima’s BECNT volume on 1-2 Thessalonians was reviewed at the Young Restless Reformed Blog.

At Blogging Theologically, Aaron Armstrong reflected on the first volume of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Shelby Etheridge reviewed Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for The Presbyterian Outlook.

At The Living Church, George Sumner reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Drew Trotter reviewed Robert Johnston’s God’s Wider Presence for the Consortium of Christian Study Centers.

A Farewell with Thanks from the Church and Postmodern Culture blog.

Daniel Block, author of For the Glory of God, recently gave a lecture on worship at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – February 6, 2015

Cover ArtThe Christian Century featured an excerpt from Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker.

Bonhoeffer reminds us that we must form our ministries around explorations of the living Christ. He also points us to the practical dispositions of doing youth ministry. He encourages us to do ministry through stories of our own faith life and to prayerfully seek composure, a spirit of calm. A calm disposition, coupled with narration, creates fertile ground for a depth of relationship (what Bonhoeffer called Stellvertretung or “place-sharing”) that mediates the presence of the living Christ..

Also, Root discussed Bonhoeffer and youth ministry in this month’s Christianity Today cover story, and Mark Husbands reviewed Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker for the Hope College blog.

Reformed Catholicity, by Michael Allen and Scott Swain, was reviewed by Gavin Ortlund at The Gospel Coalition, and by Derek Rishmawy at Reformedish.

At Don’t Stop Believing, Mike Wittmer reviewed J. Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth.

Steve Bishop , at An Accidental Blog, also reviewed A New Heaven and a New Earth.

At Reformation 21, Jon Coutts reviewed James Skillen’s The Good of Politics.

D. A. Carson’s Praying With Paul was reviewed at Treasuring Christ.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

Caleb Spindler praised Jonathan Pennington’s Reading the Gospels Wisely.

The Etownian reported on a lecture by Mark Nation on key themes in Bonhoeffer the Assassin?