BA Books & Authors on the Web – May 1, 2015

Cover ArtThe Church according to Paul by James Thompson received the 2015 Book of the Year Award from the Academy of Parish Clergy.

We were in unanimous agreement that it is a great resource for working pastors. It is superlative of the best work coming out of biblical studies, because it is not written simply for the academy’s ivory tower but for the sake of the church.

Dave Hershey reviewed James K.A. Smith’s Who’s Afraid of Relativism?

Jennifer Guo reviewed Reformed Catholicity by Michael Allen and Scott Swain.

Spencer Robinson, at Spoiled Milks, reviewed Frank Thielman’s BECNT volume on Ephesians.

Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek and John Dobson’s Learn New Testament Greek were recommended at Credo Magazine.

Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea was reviewed by Blair Smith at Reformation 21.

Gloria Furman, at The Gospel Coalition, is reading The King in His Beauty by Tom Schreiner, Let the Nations Be Glad by John Piper, and A New Testament Biblical Theology by G. K. Beale.

D. A. Carson was interviewed on Point of View about his new book Praying with Paul, which Point of View also reviewed.

Rob Johnston, author of God’s Wider Presence, was invited to give a series of lectures on faith and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary. You can find the videos here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – December 19, 2014

Cover ArtAllen Mickle Jr. reviewed Rodney Decker’s Reading Koine Greek.

“Dr. Decker met with me to encourage me to consider using his pre-published Greek text. He gave me a copy to review, and after working through much of the text, I found it a superior version for teaching. Here are my thoughts on why you should consider Decker for first year Greek instruction.”

Seumas Macdonald, at The Patrologist, is working through Reading Koine Greek. You can read his reflections here: Part 1, part 2, part 3.

Chris Woznicki reviewed Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, Scott Hafemann, N. T. Wright, and John Frederick.

At Unsettled Christianity, Joel Watts reviewed Atonement, Law, and Justice by Adonis Vidu.

Ed Smither reviewed Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea.

At Faith and History, Robert Tracy McKenzie reflected on Mark Noll’s From Every Tribe and Nation.

Bryan Litfin, author of Early Christian Martyr Stories, was interviewed on Chris Fabrey Live!

William Tabbernee was interviewed on The Janet Mefferd Show, about his new book, Early Christianity in Contexts.

Adonis Vidu discussed Atonement, Law, and Justice at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 24, 2014

Cover ArtAndrew Root, author of Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker, was interviewed by Arni Zachariassen at theologues.

“Dietrich asserts that there is no such thing as “Christian youth.” Ultimately, what he wants to steer away from is an idol he thinks the church bows to often, which is to glorify youthfulness. Dietrich sees a church (and I see a church today) that badly wants a youthful spirit but not the concrete humanity of young people themselves. We want the young around the church because it makes the church seem like a vital/culturally legitimate institution. But we are less willing to make space for the young at the center of our lives together.”

At Jesus Creed, Scot McKnight continued his series on Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker in the posts Who Owns Bonhoeffer? and Rethinking “Youth” Ministry.

Also, Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed by Calvin Park at Random Bloggings and Diane Reynolds at Bonhoeffer: Women, Life, Times, and featured in the New Book Releases at The Englewood Review of Books.

Justin Taylor, at The Gospel Coalition, interviewed Bryan Litfin about his new book Early Christian Martyr Stories.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, shared a quote on historical criticism from God’s Word in Human Words by Kenton Sparks.

The Drama of Scripture, by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, was reviewed by Steve Bishop at An Accidental Blog and by Jacob Prahlow at Pursuing Veritas.

Daniel Block’s For the Glory of God was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Basil of Caesarea, by Stephen Hildebrand, was reviewed by Kyle Hughes at Early Christian Archives.

Kengo Akiyama, at Biblical and Early Christian Studies, reviewed Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 17, 2014

Cover ArtLawrence Osborn, at Theosblog, reviewed Basil of Caesarea by Stephen Hildebrand.

“Basil of Caesarea was one of the key theologians of the early Church. As such, he is well known to contemporary students of theology, but often only in a fragmentary way and often only as a theologian. In this detailed and lucid introduction to Basil’s life and thought, Stephen Hildebrand has integrated those fragments to give us a rounded picture of the man and his thought.”

Stanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament was reviewed by George P. Wood.

Chris Ho, at the Young Restless and Reformed Blog, reviewed For the Glory of God by Daniel Block.

Peter Enns, author of Inspiration and Incarnation, shared a quote from God’s Word in Human Words by Kenton Sparks.

Robert Sylvester, at the Spirlaw blog, reflected on Roger Lundin’s Beginning with the Word.

Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, by David Setran and Chris Kiesling, was discussed at The Humanitas Forum.

Brian Sandifer reflected on Dale Kuehne’s Sex in the iWorld.

Nijay Gupta, at Crux Sola, is looking forward to the release of Peter Oakes’ Paideia commentary on Galatians.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – September 19, 2014

Cover ArtAt The Englewood Review of Books, Jeanne Lehninger reviewed Roger Lundin’s Beginning with the Word.

“Lundin is a wonderful teacher who explicates clearly why contemporary thought regarding language and literature is what it is and what the implications are for the church. Not merely an academic treatise, Beginning with the Word both begins and ends in delight and wisdom. Best of all, Lundin answers the question of why it matters that words are more than symbols. That they are reflections of the Word made flesh makes them bearers of truth and grace.”

Also, Roger Lundin was interviewed about Beginning with the Word on the Christian Humanist Podcast.

At the Strong Towns Podcast, Charles Marohn interviewed Eric Jacobson, author of The Space Between.

Wyatt Graham, at Writings and Reviews, reviewed Stephen Hildebrand’s Basil of Caesarea.

Michael Allen, author of Justification and the Gospel, wrote “The Desire and Joy of the Gospel” for Good News.

At Philonica et Neotestamentica, Torrey Seland quoted from Jesus against the Scribal Elite, by Chris Keith.

Finally, Graham Twelftree, author of Paul and the Miraculous, gave a lecture entitled “The Historian and the Miraculous“.

The Witness of Scripture and Creation – an Excerpt from Basil of Caesarea

The following is an excerpt from Basil of Caesarea, by Stephen M. Hildebrand.

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Basil sees the Bible and the world as two principal instruments whereby God teaches and forms man. Mindfulness of God is a most important concept for him, and it well expresses the role of the physical creation as well as the Scriptures in our salvation. “I want the marvel of creation,” Basils preaches to his people, “to gain such complete acceptance from you that, wherever you may be found and whatever kind of plant you may chance upon, you may receive a clear reminder of the Creator” (Hex. 5.2; 69).

Cover ArtOr, again, Basil writes that “when the day is ended, a mere glance at the starlit heavens is sufficient to call forth from the heart a fervent prayer of thanksgiving and adoration to the Mighty Architect of the universe” (Hom. Mart. Jul. 3). Of course, it is not just plants or stars that will remind us of God but any creature whatsoever.

However, the Scriptures for Basil clearly have a greater power than creation to remind us of God. First, there is the fact that the book that is the Bible is itself a guide to the book of creation: God instructs us in the former how to read the latter. Even more, Basil does not speak of creation itself bringing us to a knowledge of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit; only the Bible does so, and not just in the New Testament. We have seen how Basil takes the “Let us make” of Genesis 1:26 (Hex. 10.4).

We see another example in the third homily on creation, wherein Basil points out that God could have simply reported the creation of the world. Instead of a simple report, however, we get the hint of a co-worker. God speaks and commands, and this speaking and commanding implies that there is someone commanded, someone spoken to. “This way of speaking has been wisely and skillfully employed so as to rouse our mind to an inquiry of the Person to whom these words are directed” (Hex. 3.2; 39).

That is to say, God is inviting us to wonder about his Son and raising our minds to a consideration of the divine life; God introduces theology (Hex. 10.4).

©2014 by Stephen M. Hildebrand. Published by Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on Basil of Caesarea, click here.

New Release: Basil of Caesarea

Cover ArtBasil of Caesarea, the third addition to the Foundations of Theological Exegesis and Christian Spirituality series, surveys Basil’s theological, spiritual, and monastic writings, showing the importance of his work for contemporary theology and spirituality.

In this volume Stephen Hildebrand brings together various aspects of Basil’s thought into a single whole and explores his uniqueness and creativity as a theologian. The book engages specialized scholarship on Basil but makes his thought accessible to a wider audience.

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“This is a wonderful book on one of the great thinkers of the ancient Christian world. It offers the reader a broad window onto his personality and writing in a radiantly lively way. It will be a standard book for students and all those interested in early Christian theology.” – John McGuckin, Columbia University

“Basil is a pivotal figure in the history of the church, and his biblical interpretation is no small part of this achievement. We cannot begin to understand his prodigies of charitable activity or ecclesiastical administration until we understand his ascesis and his contemplative approach to Scripture. This book is more than a look back. At a time when the world is regaining an appreciation of social doctrine, spiritual discipline, and patristic exegesis, it is a way forward.” – Scott Hahn, Franciscan University of Steubenville

“Basil of Caesarea is the giant of the fourth-century theologians, and he intimidates many who approach his works today. Here lies the value of Stephen Hildebrand’s book: he introduces us not to a part of Basil’s thought but to his theology as a whole. Moreover, he introduces not merely a corpus of ancient texts but also their author. This is a valuable book not only for historians of theology but for anyone who wants to understand the role of theology in late antiquity.” – Thomas O’Loughlin, University of Nottingham

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Stephen M. Hildebrand (PhD, Fordham University) is professor of theology and director of the theology graduate program at Franciscan University of Steubenville in Steubenville, Ohio. He is the author of The Trinitarian Theology of Basil of Caesarea and has published a translation of On the Holy Spirit.

For more information on Basil of Caesarea, click here.