BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 21, 2014

Cover ArtThe Good of Politics by James Skillen was extensively reviewed Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

“[I]t is with exceptional gladness that we can here announce the publication of the brand new book by James Skillen, The Good of Politics….In various ways in this important book, Skillen helps us ponder what we mean by ‘public justice’ and the ‘common good’ and ponders essential questions such as how the state – which is God’s good gift to us, not a bad thing — can use legitimate authority to help order our pluralistic political community.”

Billy Kangas at The Orant reviewed Jonathan Wilson’s God’s Good World.

At Everyday Theology, Marc Cortez reflected on discerning God’s work in historical events, and turned to John Fea’s Why Study History?

Also, the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association recently released its list of thirty-six finalists for the 2014 Christian Book Award. We are please to announce that the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi, and The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, have been selected as finalists in the Bible Reference category

BA Books & Authors on the Web – March 14, 2014

Cover ArtWhy Study History? by John Fea was reviewed by John G. Turner in The Christian Century.

“[Christians] should follow Fea’s advice to examine aspects of the past that initially repel them. Fea tells of a student with progressive views who chose to write a thesis about Jerry Falwell and the rise of the Christian right. He also recounts the reactions of students who read the diaries and sermons of slaveholding American Christians. It is easier to devote ourselves to historical subjects that we like or imagine to be more like us. Fea reports that his students have cultivated their capacities for empathy and compassion and became “better Christians.” Such encounters, Fea maintains, remind us that we are “imperfect creatures in need of improvement and redemption.”

At Euangelion, Michael Bird reviewed R. Michael Allen’s Justification and the Gospel.

David Gowler recommended the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi.

Richard Beck, at Experimental Theology, reflected on Christian formation in light of James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom.

Tim Meadowcroft recommended John Goldingay’s three volumes on Psalms in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms, along with Richard Hess’s work on Song of Songs in the same series, in the Catalyst article “Building an Old Testament Library: Psalms — Daniel.”

James K. A. Smith recently spoke on Imagining the Kingdom at Spring Arbor University. You can watch his presentation here.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – November 8, 2013

Cover ArtThis month’s Christianity Today cover article “How Lewis Lit the Way to Better Apologetics” is taken from Michael Ward’s essay in Imaginative Apologetics.

“Lewis’s conversion was sparked (humanly speaking) by a long nighttime conversation with J. R. R. Tolkien and Hugo Dyson. They were discussing Christianity, metaphor, and myth. In a letter to Arthur Greeves (dated October 18, 1931), Lewis recounted the conversation. It is clear that questions of meaning—that is to say, of imagination—were at the heart of it.

At that point, Lewis’s problem with Christianity was fundamentally imaginative. ‘What has been holding me back . . . has not been so much a difficulty in believing as a difficulty in knowing what the doctrine meant,’ he told Greeves. Tolkien and Dyson showed him that Christian doctrines are not the main thing about Christianity. Instead, doctrines are translations of what God has expressed in ‘a language more adequate: namely the actual incarnation, crucifixion and resurrection’ of Christ.”

Jonathan Watson at the Logos Academic Blog interviewed Michael Allen, author of Justification and the Gospel.

Larry Hurtado briefly reviewed Craig Keener’s first two volumes on Acts.

Don Garlington reviewed Warren Carter’s Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, for RBL.

At Near Emmaus, Brain LePort reviewed The World of the New Testament, edited by Joel Green and Lee McDonald.

Byron Borger reviewed Journey toward Justice by Nicholas Wolterstorff, for the Hearts & Minds blog.

At For Christ and His Kingdom, Jordan Barrett reviewed Millard Erickson’s Christian Theology, 3rd edition.

Amanda MacInnis recommended The Suffering and Victorious Christ, by Richard Mouw and Douglas Sweeney.

Trent Nicholson reviewed Why Study History?, by John Fea.

Also, John Fea wrote an article titled “Here’s why we’re losing our democratic soul” for PennLive.

Brian at Right Lane Reflections reviewed Desiring the Kingdom, by James K.A. Smith.

At NT Exegesis, Brian Renshaw reviewed the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi.

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 11, 2013

Cover ArtAt Christianity Today, David Neff recently spoke with Ron Sider about his recent book, The Early Church on Killing, in an interview titled “Were the Church Fathers Consistently Pro-Life?

Why should we care what the writers of those first three centuries say?

I don’t think that what the early church in the first few centuries said and did is the final norm for Christians today. Our decisive norm is biblical revelation. Nevertheless, I think we need to take seriously what the Christians in the first three centuries thought Jesus was saying. They were much closer to him in time than we are, and there is reason to think they would have had a pretty good understanding of what he meant. Therefore, given that every single Christian text we have on killing from the first three centuries, whether war, capital punishment, or abortion, says that Christians don’t do that, and with some frequency they say that’s because of what Jesus said and did, I think Christians today ought to listen to them with some seriousness.

Also at CT, Neff interacted with Sider’s The Early Church on Killing in his article “Why Don’t We Find Bloodshed Repugnant Anymore?”

Doug Moo was interviewed about writing his new Galatians commentary by Lindsay Kennedy at My Digital Seminary.

The Christian Century’sTake & Read” recommendations for New Testament books included Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, by Warren Carter, A Peaceable Hope, by David Neville, and the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi.

Rick Wadholm Jr. at the I Heart Barth blog recommended Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

At Words on the Word, Abram K-J studied Luke 17 with the help of Darrell Bock’s BECNT volumes.

Jim Kane reviewed Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

Heath Henwood reviewed Rebirth of the Church, by Eddie Gibbs.

At The Anxious Bench, Miles Mullin reviewed Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity, by Robin Jensen.

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eBook Specials

Today only, Friday October 11, the Commentary on Romans eBook by Robert Gundry is available free at participating retailers. Learn more here.