BA Books & Authors on the Web – January 9, 2015

Cover ArtDerek Rishmawy, at The Gospel Coalition, explains “Why You Should Read Bavinck.”

“Bavinck’s accomplishment in the Dogmatics is nothing short of jaw-dropping. The expansive, nuanced, and deeply trinitarian theological vision is both intellectually challenging and spiritually nourishing. I anticipate turning to these volumes regularly in the years to come.”

Reviews

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was reviewed at Euangelion.

Craig Blomberg reviewed A Peaceable Hope by David Neville, as well as The King in His Beauty by Thomas Schreiner, for the Denver Journal here and here.

Nate Claiborne reviewed Exploring Psychology and Christian Faith, by Paul Moes and Donald Tellinghuisen.

Chris Keith’s Jesus against the Scribal Elite was reviewed at CHOICE connect.

At Discovering the Mission of God, Ed reviewed Understanding Christian Mission by Scott Sunquist.

Andrew Root’s Bonhoeffer as Youth Worker was reviewed at Diglotting.

Michael Philliber, at Deus Misereatur, reviewed The Holy Trinity in the Life of the Church, edited by Khaled Anatolios.

Best Of

As 2014 came to a close, quite a number of Baker Academic titles were featured in “Best of” posts.

Galatians and Christian Theology, edited by Mark Elliott, John Frederick, Scott Hafemann and N.T. Wright, was named as one of “The Top (Mockingbird) Theology Books of 2014.”

At Crux Sola, Nijay Gupta listed Chris Keith’s Jesus Against the Scribal Elite, Galatians and Christian Theology, Jeffrey Weima’s 1-2 Thessalonians, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth among the “Best New Testament Academic Books of 2014.”

Women in the World of the Earliest Christians by Lynn Cohick, Wealth and Poverty in Early Church and Society edited by Susan Holman, Scripture and Tradition by Edith Humphrey, The Economy of Desire by Daniel Bell, and Loving the Poor, Saving the Rich by Helen Rhee were all in Alvin Rapien’s “Top 10 Books of 2014.”

The Missio Alliance Essential Reading List of 2014” featured Introducing Evangelical Ecotheology, by Daniel Brunner, Jennifer Butler, and A. J. Swoboda.

At Reformation 21, Michael Allen and Scott Swain’s Reformed Catholicity, Simon Gathercole’s Defending Substitution, Kevin Vanhoozer and Owen Strachan’s The Pastor as Public Theologian, and Richard Bauckham’s Gospel of Glory were noted as “New & Noteworthy Books in 2015.”

Elsewhere

Scot McKnight reflected on Alistair Stewart’s The Original Bishops in the post “Paul and the Economic Justice Vision of Jesus“, and Richard Middleton’s A New Heaven and a New Earth led to his discussion “Revolution in Eschatology Today?

Andrew McGowan, author of Ancient Christian Worship, wrote “Incarnation and Epiphany: How Christmas became a Christian Feast” for ABC Religion and Ethics.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – June 27, 2014

Cover ArtDenis Fortin reviewed Robin Jensen’s Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity for RBL.

“Jensen does a magnificent job of presenting these five core motifs of baptism in early Christian documents and art. Her excellent knowledge of ancient literature is evident and her analysis of art forms very enlightening….Any student of early church history and theology will appreciate its value.”

Also at RBL, Abson Joseph reviewed the third edition of Encountering the New Testament, by Walter Elwell and Robert Yarbrough.

Conrade Yap, at Panorama of a Book Saint, reviewed Reading the Historical Books, by Patricia Dutcher-Walls.

Andrew Marr reviewed David Neville’s A Peaceable Hope.

At Analogical Thoughts, James Anderson reviewed Christian Philosophy by Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen.

James K.A. Smith, author of Who’s Afraid of Relativism? and Imagining the Kingdom, wrote Steadfast Principles in a Changing World as part of a New York Times series on Christianity and Capitalism.

Old Testament Commentary Survey by Tremper Longman, and New Testament Commentary Survey by D.A. Carson, were recommended in the Pastors Today article How to Find a Good Commentary.

An excerpt from Mark Cannister’s Teenagers Matter was shared in Outreach Magazine.

Haddon Robinson, author of Biblical Preaching, was interviewed by Ministry Magazine.

Walter Moberly’s Old Testament Theology was recommended in Catalyst’s Summer Reading list.

 

BA Books & Authors on the Web – October 11, 2013

Cover ArtAt Christianity Today, David Neff recently spoke with Ron Sider about his recent book, The Early Church on Killing, in an interview titled “Were the Church Fathers Consistently Pro-Life?

Why should we care what the writers of those first three centuries say?

I don’t think that what the early church in the first few centuries said and did is the final norm for Christians today. Our decisive norm is biblical revelation. Nevertheless, I think we need to take seriously what the Christians in the first three centuries thought Jesus was saying. They were much closer to him in time than we are, and there is reason to think they would have had a pretty good understanding of what he meant. Therefore, given that every single Christian text we have on killing from the first three centuries, whether war, capital punishment, or abortion, says that Christians don’t do that, and with some frequency they say that’s because of what Jesus said and did, I think Christians today ought to listen to them with some seriousness.

Also at CT, Neff interacted with Sider’s The Early Church on Killing in his article “Why Don’t We Find Bloodshed Repugnant Anymore?”

Doug Moo was interviewed about writing his new Galatians commentary by Lindsay Kennedy at My Digital Seminary.

The Christian Century’sTake & Read” recommendations for New Testament books included Seven Events That Shaped the New Testament World, by Warren Carter, A Peaceable Hope, by David Neville, and the Handbook of Women Biblical Interpreters, edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Agnes Choi.

Rick Wadholm Jr. at the I Heart Barth blog recommended Bonhoeffer the Assassin?

At Words on the Word, Abram K-J studied Luke 17 with the help of Darrell Bock’s BECNT volumes.

Jim Kane reviewed Spiritual Formation in Emerging Adulthood, by David Setran and Chris Kiesling.

Heath Henwood reviewed Rebirth of the Church, by Eddie Gibbs.

At The Anxious Bench, Miles Mullin reviewed Baptismal Imagery in Early Christianity, by Robin Jensen.

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eBook Specials

Today only, Friday October 11, the Commentary on Romans eBook by Robert Gundry is available free at participating retailers. Learn more here.

New Release: A Peaceable Hope by David Neville

In the New Testament texts, there is significant tension between Jesus’s nonviolent mission and message and the apparent violence attributed to God and God’s agents at the anticipated end. David Neville explores that tension and challenges the ready association between New Testament eschatology and retributive vengeance on christological and canonical grounds.

Neville explores the narrative sections of the New Testament–the Gospels, Acts, and Revelation–with a view to developing a peaceable, as opposed to retributive, understanding of New Testament eschatology. He develops a “hermeneutic of shalom” for reading these texts and offers interpretive resources for grappling responsibly with them.

Read an excerpt from A Peaceable Hope.

“The notorious disjunction between the peaceable Jesus who commands love of enemy and the returning Jesus who brings punitive vengeance is here met head-on. Neville is historically honest, hermeneutically sophisticated, and personally candid. This is New Testament theology at its best and most helpful.”–Dale C. Allison Jr., Errett M. Grable Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

“Can there be divine judgment without divine vengeance and violence? Does NT eschatology undermine NT ethics? David Neville’s detailed exegetical and hermeneutical study of the Gospels, Acts, and Revelation makes a valuable contribution to these important questions. It is a manifesto for, and a demonstration of, a hermeneutic of peace.”–Michael J. Gorman, Raymond E. Brown Professor of Biblical Studies and Theology, St. Mary’s Seminary & University, Baltimore

David J. Neville (PhD, Murdoch University) is associate professor of theology and lecturer in New Testament studies at Charles Sturt University in Canberra, Australia. He is the author or editor of several books.

For more information on A Peaceable Hope, click here.